The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas Questions and Answers

The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

All societies are riven with injustice of one sort or another. But there are few, if any, where the happiness of the people, not to mention the peace and stability of society, is dependent on the...

Latest answer posted August 28, 2020, 11:44 am (UTC)

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The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

The people of Omelas understand, to varying degrees, that the "happiness of thousands" is dependent on the abject misery of the child in the closet. They know that the "goodness and grace of every...

Latest answer posted November 1, 2020, 12:37 pm (UTC)

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The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

At times, the narrator of “The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas” can be disconcertingly vague about certain of the particulars of life in this fictitious town. It's as if she's inviting us to fill in...

Latest answer posted August 28, 2020, 12:19 pm (UTC)

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The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

One way to think about the story is to understand it as a comment on modern society and the imagination. In this way of thinking, the narrator assumes that the reader will have a hard time...

Latest answer posted July 7, 2019, 1:30 pm (UTC)

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The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

Polysyndeton refers to using several conjunctions in a row to achieve a dramatic effect. That can be seen in this sentence about the child: The child used to scream for help at night, and cry a...

Latest answer posted November 19, 2019, 4:21 am (UTC)

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The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

Although "they seem to know where they are going," there is a moral ambiguity about the choice of the few who walk away from Omelas; for, in leaving Omelas to make their own destinies free of a...

Latest answer posted July 13, 2010, 8:05 am (UTC)

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The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

In Ursula K. LeGuin's "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas," happiness and misery are juxtaposed in an extreme setting. In the city of Omelas, every person is happy: there is a festival atmosphere,...

Latest answer posted February 15, 2017, 1:10 pm (UTC)

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The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

Le Guin is stating the formula for the happiness that characterizes the fictional city of Ornelas. She is saying that happiness is based on the ability to tell the difference among what are...

Latest answer posted May 29, 2010, 1:28 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

I would suggest that Ursula K. LeGuin's "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas" has a universality about it such that it can quite possibly be applied to just about any society or culture in human...

Latest answer posted December 9, 2019, 8:10 pm (UTC)

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The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

The narrator has such specific and detailed knowledge of Omelas that it seems as though he or she might have lived there once. The narrator knows what the life of the children is like, what the...

Latest answer posted February 13, 2018, 12:43 am (UTC)

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The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

I would describe the main conflict in this story as one existing between character and society. The narrator tells us that all young people are informed of and offered the opportunity to go and see...

Latest answer posted January 6, 2018, 1:51 am (UTC)

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The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

The child who is locked up in "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas" represents a scapegoat. The subtitle of Le Guin's story is "Variations on a Theme by William James." This subtitle indicates that...

Latest answer posted August 4, 2017, 4:11 am (UTC)

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The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

The suffering child functions to set up the central conflict in the story. At first, Omelas sounds like a perfect utopia, a beautiful, joyous place that combines the best of Medieval community and...

Latest answer posted August 28, 2020, 11:48 am (UTC)

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The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

One might describe the city of Omelas as exceptionally beautiful. The narrator says that it is “bright-towered,” evidently referred to the illumined beauty of the city buildings. The flags on the...

Latest answer posted August 28, 2020, 12:16 pm (UTC)

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The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

In the short story "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas" by Ursula K. Le Guin, the author describes a city that seems to be ideal. It is the Festival of Summer and the city is decorated for the...

Latest answer posted September 13, 2020, 2:04 am (UTC)

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The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

In the short story "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas," the author poses some serious questions to the reader. As the story opens, the mood appears quite joyful and idyllic. The Festival of Summer...

Latest answer posted February 27, 2018, 5:08 pm (UTC)

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The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

In most dystopias, the numerous evils of the relevant society exist above ground, so to speak; they are out in the open and obvious to anyone with eyes to see. A good example would be the...

Latest answer posted August 28, 2020, 11:07 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

In Le Guin's story, "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas," the story itself as a parable is a metaphor. For, the imaginary world of Omelas as an idyllic community is an unstated comparison of the...

Latest answer posted July 28, 2009, 8:02 am (UTC)

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The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

To answer this question, we first need to establish what an allegory is. In a nutshell, an allegorical story is one that can be unpacked to reveal a hidden meaning, moral, or deeper truth. There is...

Latest answer posted August 28, 2020, 7:08 pm (UTC)

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The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

The short story "The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas" by Ursula K. Le Guin begins with a description of the joyous people of the city celebrating the Festival of Summer. The children are happy, and...

Latest answer posted October 11, 2019, 2:57 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

Utilitarianism is a philosophy that values the happiness of the majority over that of the minority. Therefore, if the happiness of a few people must be sacrificed to ensure that most people are...

Latest answer posted October 30, 2019, 10:03 pm (UTC)

4 educator answers

The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

To be able to write a good thesis statement for an essay on "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas" by Ursula K. Le Guin, it is necessary to have a good grasp of what the short story is about, so...

Latest answer posted March 25, 2020, 3:23 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

I would suggest that the central theme of Ursula K. Le Guin's famed short story "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas" is happiness—and to be more specific, the intersection between happiness and...

Latest answer posted March 19, 2021, 11:01 pm (UTC)

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The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

There's a direct causal link between the poor abused child being locked up in a basement and forced to live in unimaginable squalor and the continued happiness of the people of Omelas. Simply put,...

Latest answer posted August 28, 2020, 11:17 am (UTC)

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The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

The point of view of this unusual short story by Ursula K. LeGuin is first-person objective. The phrase first person refers to the fact that the narrator uses the first person pronoun I as they...

Latest answer posted August 28, 2020, 11:39 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

Le Guin's quote appears at the point where she is at her zenith in describing the citizens of Omelas. In articulating the state of happiness that exists in the town, Le Guin breaks off a bit in...

Latest answer posted October 8, 2011, 12:00 pm (UTC)

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The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

According to the narrator of "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas," "Happiness is based on a just discrimination of what is necessary, what is neither necessary nor destructive, and what is...

Latest answer posted March 28, 2016, 8:36 pm (UTC)

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The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

At first glance Omelas is very much a utopian society—it is not a city with all our modern trappings, but the narrator stresses that this does not mean the people of Omelas are simple. They are...

Latest answer posted February 26, 2016, 5:27 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

For the majority of the short story, the narrator conveys a detached resignation to the bargain on which this society rests. The child who is held in captivity is described in factual, neutral...

Latest answer posted November 10, 2019, 10:22 pm (UTC)

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The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

The people who decide to stay in Omelas are able, eventually, to accept the "terrible justice of reality": that their own happiness and the happiness of thousands of others depends upon the abject...

Latest answer posted April 25, 2020, 3:45 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

Both stories take place in a fantasy society which enforces conformity to soul damaging norms. Both stories are didactic, written to teach the reader cautionary lessons about troubling trends in...

Latest answer posted November 8, 2018, 1:30 pm (UTC)

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The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

Omelas at first appears to be a perfect Utopian society: beautiful, communitarian, and joyful, with a bright medieval aesthetic and judicious use of whatever aspects of modern technology are needed...

Latest answer posted August 28, 2020, 1:28 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

Ursula K. Le Guin is an award-winning science-fiction and fantasy author, so the tone of the story "The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas" is poetic, almost as a fable. The opening lines set the...

Latest answer posted April 24, 2012, 2:15 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

That ambiguities exist in the direction of LeGuin's "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas" is apparent as there exist two titles for this story. The second one, "Variations on a theme by William...

Latest answer posted November 20, 2009, 10:07 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

In describing the citizens of Omelas, the narrator says, They were not simple folk, you see, though they were happy. But we do not say the words of cheer anymore. All smiles have become archaic....

Latest answer posted June 21, 2018, 2:06 pm (UTC)

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The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

This is a very interesting question. Simply put, there is little definitive as to the identity of the narrator. There are some hints that allow for an analysis as to who the narrator could be....

Latest answer posted August 22, 2011, 7:41 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

A paradox can be defined as a situation that has seemingly contradictory features or qualities. When the young townspeople are between eight and twelve and develop a sense of reasoning and...

Latest answer posted August 28, 2020, 11:55 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

As the story opens, the narrator invites the reader to imagine Omelas as a beautiful, joyous place. It is filled with festivals, celebrations, and a community of well-fed, well-cared-for citizens...

Latest answer posted August 28, 2020, 11:33 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

One way to interpret the symbolic significance of the mistreated child in Ursula K LeGuin’s short story “The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas” is to see the child as symbolizing the suffering the...

Latest answer posted November 3, 2011, 1:55 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

Considered a political and moral allegory by many, "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas" has had as an alternate title, "Variations on a Theme by William James." For, Ursula LeGuin wrote this story...

Latest answer posted February 27, 2014, 12:34 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

In "The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas," the utopian society of Omelas is whatever the reader makes of it; it can be as urban or rural as desired. However, the entire fantasy of Omelas is dependent...

Latest answer posted April 24, 2012, 2:27 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

Interestingly, Le Guin's story, "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas" is subtitled "Variations on a Theme by Williams James." James, the older brother of psychologist and author Henry James,...

Latest answer posted August 2, 2009, 2:59 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

For the most part, it's fair to say that the people of Omelas are happy. This is a town in which the sun never seems to stop shining, and where the people live out a hedonistic existence in which...

Latest answer posted August 28, 2020, 11:30 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

Essentially, the dark secret in LeGuin's story is that everyone's happiness in Omelas is dependent on the abuse and neglect of a child. Consider this line from the enotes summary of the story:...

Latest answer posted June 16, 2010, 12:58 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

In the town of Omelas, the suffering of one child provides the seeming sacrifice needed to allow for the happiness and beauty of the rest of the town. When the townspeople are young, they are taken...

Latest answer posted August 28, 2020, 11:10 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

The narrator is not a resident of Omelas. While the narrator is unaware of societies outside Omelas, they are also unaware of certain aspects of Omelas society -- asking the reader to imagine or...

Latest answer posted October 24, 2017, 4:59 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

The child in "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas" is significant as a scapegoat who bears the burden of misery for the community. This child also represents the dilemma of pragmatism. With the...

Latest answer posted October 29, 2015, 6:15 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

For a Kantian, there's only one appropriate response to the scenario Le Guin depicts in "The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas." Kant offered several, interrelated formulations of his categorical...

Latest answer posted December 18, 2019, 5:29 am (UTC)

3 educator answers

The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

With respect, I think you are slightly mistaken in your conclusions about this story. You are right in thinking that there are two groups of characters that are presented: those who stay, and those...

Latest answer posted February 20, 2011, 6:32 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

In this story, the narrator often speaks directly to the readers, assuming we're incredulous about the utopian nature of Omelas, anticipating and addressing our logical objections, and even...

Latest answer posted March 27, 2016, 11:23 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

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