The Old Man and the Sea Questions and Answers

The Old Man and the Sea

There are plenty of moral lessons that can be drawn from The Old Man and the Sea. Some of the more obvious ones include the following: Persistence is a virtue: The entire story is based on the old...

Latest answer posted January 14, 2021, 11:16 am (UTC)

4 educator answers

The Old Man and the Sea

Ernest Hemingway's novel The Old Man and the Sea tells the story of Santiago, an old Cuban fisherman, and his battle with a giant marlin far out in the Gulf of Mexico. Santiago (the old man) serves...

Latest answer posted February 25, 2019, 10:12 pm (UTC)

7 educator answers

The Old Man and the Sea

This statement by Santiago means that a man is defined by how faces what life throws at him, not by what happens to him. What is most important in life is living to the fullest extent of one's...

Latest answer posted January 13, 2021, 1:03 pm (UTC)

4 educator answers

The Old Man and the Sea

I think that people might find symbolism even if the author does not want them to look for it. Tolkien insisted that The Lord of the Rings was not allegorical. I guess the question is whether or...

Latest answer posted November 4, 2012, 11:53 pm (UTC)

6 educator answers

The Old Man and the Sea

Truth be told, Santiago's seen better days as a fisherman. While younger competitors regularly bring their impressive catches into harbor, he's stuck in the middle of a long losing streak that's...

Latest answer posted January 5, 2021, 10:36 am (UTC)

4 educator answers

The Old Man and the Sea

In a novella like The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway, the conclusion, also known as the resolution, is the final part of the story, where the writer resolves conflicts and ties up loose...

Latest answer posted December 8, 2021, 5:41 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Old Man and the Sea

For Santiago, the sea isn't just a large body of water. It isn't just his place of work, a place where he makes a living. It's so much more than that: it's an extension of his soul. Whereas others...

Latest answer posted May 10, 2020, 9:58 am (UTC)

4 educator answers

The Old Man and the Sea

Ernest Hemingway was both a modernist and a realist and was a leading figure in both movements. His laconic style presents the reader with minimal description and dialogue, eschewing commentary,...

Latest answer posted June 15, 2020, 1:58 am (UTC)

3 educator answers

The Old Man and the Sea

The marlin symbolizes both a dream come true and a massive hurdle that must be overcome. Having not caught any fish in 84 days, Santiago was desperate for his luck to change. With fishing being his...

Latest answer posted May 25, 2020, 5:30 am (UTC)

6 educator answers

The Old Man and the Sea

On page 11, Hemingway writes: But, he thought, I keep them [the fishing lines] with precision. Only I have no luck any more. But who knows? Maybe today. Every day is a new day. It is better to be...

Latest answer posted November 5, 2009, 4:22 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Old Man and the Sea

In The Old Man and the Sea, Santiago, the protagonist, fulfills the definition of the Hemingway code hero since he possesses honor, courage, and endurance in an existence of misfortune, stress,...

Latest answer posted July 31, 2017, 12:17 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Old Man and the Sea

Santiago feels a kinship with the turtles because his hands and feet are like theirs, horny and hard. The turtles are tough and impervious to the stings of the treacherous jellyfish, just as...

Latest answer posted May 22, 2017, 11:12 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Old Man and the Sea

Santiago describes the ocean as feminine. But the old man always thought of her as feminine and as something that gave or withheld great favors, and if she did wild or wicked things it was because...

Latest answer posted June 9, 2018, 3:12 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Old Man and the Sea

The boy recognizes the courage of the old man becomes fond of him for his spirit; however, this admiration would not be as uncommon in the culture of the boy. Then, through their love of fishing...

Latest answer posted January 26, 2013, 5:17 am (UTC)

5 educator answers

The Old Man and the Sea

While at first it may appear that the type of conflict in this story is strictly man vs. nature, the true conflict is much deeper. Santiago, a lifelong fisherman, is growing old, and feels the need...

Latest answer posted February 22, 2010, 4:43 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Old Man and the Sea

The old man in this novella by Ernest Hemingway, Santiago, is defined by his great age. Everything about him is old, readers are told, except for his eyes. Hemingway describes him as being...

Latest answer posted February 3, 2021, 11:43 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Old Man and the Sea

This is a powerful quote from this story because of what it does in terms of direct and indirect characterization of Santiago. We are directly told that he is old and his eyes are the same color...

Latest answer posted February 7, 2019, 6:41 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Old Man and the Sea

The fish is both a competitor and a companion for the old man, Santiago. The old man, a skilled and knowledgeable fisherman, has been competing all of his life. As a young man, he competed in a...

Latest answer posted April 19, 2018, 8:15 pm (UTC)

6 educator answers

The Old Man and the Sea

Santiago dreams about his boyhood, and the time he served on a ship that sailed the coast of Africa. Specifically, he dreams of Africa when he was a boy and the long golden beaches and the white...

Latest answer posted August 28, 2016, 5:54 pm (UTC)

4 educator answers

The Old Man and the Sea

Santiago calls the giant marlin "brother" because he realizes that it is a kindred spirit to him, a noble animal who will fight the good fight with everything that it has. He is glad it is not a...

Latest answer posted February 5, 2021, 12:41 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Old Man and the Sea

The simile is trying to get us to visualize Santiago's wizened old hands and what they represent. He's an old man, a fisherman who's been out to sea goodness knows how many times over the course of...

Latest answer posted February 17, 2018, 9:21 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Old Man and the Sea

The literary devices (elements and techniques) that Ernest Hemingway uses in the novella The Old Man and The Sea include: A distinct protagonist In this story the protagonist is Santiago. He is an...

Latest answer posted March 25, 2015, 7:04 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Old Man and the Sea

In The Old Man and the Sea, Ernest Hemingway describes the old man Santiago’s eyes as the only parts of his body that remain young. He writes, Everything about him was old except his eyes and they...

Latest answer posted July 19, 2021, 2:54 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Old Man and the Sea

I have had many students interpret this ending as the Santiago dying. By dreaming of the lions, they say, he is being returned to the days of his greatest strength. They argue that the boy is...

Latest answer posted August 28, 2012, 1:33 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Old Man and the Sea

The Old Man and the Sea is a short fictional novel. Nowhere in the story does Hemingway tell readers why he wrote it, and thus all critics can do is speculate about his motivations and examine...

Latest answer posted September 2, 2018, 11:23 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Old Man and the Sea

Santiago first realizes that he has developed a tendency to speak his thoughts aloud after "the boy" (meaning, Manolin) left. After that, he has not had anybody else to talk to and, as he is poor,...

Latest answer posted June 5, 2013, 2:22 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Old Man and the Sea

The Old Man and the Sea is about Santiago, an aged man who has made his living fishing but who now contends with bad luck as he has not caught a fish in 84 days. The story is about his battle with...

Latest answer posted June 17, 2017, 1:00 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Old Man and the Sea

In The Old Man and the Sea, there are three levels to the setting: land, air, and sea. The time is in the present (1952). 1. The novella begin begins on land in a fishing village on the island of...

Latest answer posted September 6, 2010, 9:48 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Old Man and the Sea

Santiago has always had difficulties with his left hand, which he says has always been a "traitor" to the other. It sometimes cramps at inopportune times. Early in the story, he sustains a mild...

Latest answer posted February 4, 2021, 12:37 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Old Man and the Sea

Santiago is not a prideful man, but he is a proud man. The word prideful carries a strong negative connotation of having too high an opinion of oneself and feeling superior to others. Pride can...

Latest answer posted February 4, 2021, 12:25 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Old Man and the Sea

In The Old Man and the Sea, catching the marlin is usually discussed in terms of Santiago's success and failure. But there is a significant moment when Santiago does delve into notions about sin...

Latest answer posted July 25, 2012, 4:54 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Old Man and the Sea

I think that you could go a variety of directions with this answer. On one hand, you could say that the title is significant because it quite succinctly tells readers what this story is going to be...

Latest answer posted June 9, 2019, 2:51 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Old Man and the Sea

The climax of a story is when the action reaches the highest point of tension. In The Old Man and the Sea, the climax occurs when Santiago kills the marlin and ties it to his boat as he heads to...

Latest answer posted June 19, 2016, 11:48 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

The Old Man and the Sea

Santiago’s words “I’m glad we do not have to kill the stars” pertain to the complex relationship between man and nature. Just before he utters the quote, Santiago kills a marlin. As he struggles...

Latest answer posted August 21, 2019, 1:50 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

The Old Man and the Sea

The word is Spanish slang, meaning, in the context of Cuban Spanish, someone who is unlucky, or, perhaps, jinxed. (It is interesting to note than in Spain, the word means something completely...

Latest answer posted March 5, 2017, 12:51 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Old Man and the Sea

The Old Man and the Sea takes place in Cuba, likely somewhere off the coast of Havana. Santiago lives in a small fishing village off the coast, though while the novella starts and ends in this...

Latest answer posted April 17, 2018, 4:36 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Old Man and the Sea

Age and experience dictates much of the behavior of both the young fishermen in this story and the old fishermen. The young fishermen are making fun of Santiago because they see his 84-day streak...

Latest answer posted February 27, 2016, 4:38 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Old Man and the Sea

That he yet dreams of the lions is symbolic that Santiago looks to his past for strength and inspiration, rather than focusing on the future which is, perhaps, bleaker. The lion is often symbolic...

Latest answer posted January 26, 2013, 5:26 am (UTC)

3 educator answers

The Old Man and the Sea

The point of view in The Old Man and the Sea is third-person omniscient. What that means for an analysis of the novel is that the reader need not have the same concerns they might have about...

Latest answer posted October 19, 2017, 9:05 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Old Man and the Sea

Hemingway believed that no matter what comes of our efforts, our nobility comes from the way we perform (with honor and dignity) rather than whether we win (achieve whatever it is we set out to...

Latest answer posted December 21, 2008, 9:17 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Old Man and the Sea

As Santiago remembers hooking the marlin, he recalls how male marlin always let the female marlin eat first, and so the female marlin had been hooked. The male marlin stayed right by her, and even...

Latest answer posted September 8, 2011, 8:15 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Old Man and the Sea

On the 84th day without catching any fish, Santiago sets out once again. He and Manolin, his young friend, walk to the docks to set out separately. Here, in the very beginning of the book, is where...

Latest answer posted May 4, 2016, 3:59 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Old Man and the Sea

Santiago's dreams as he lightly sleeps in the bow of his boat having secured his line so that he will awaken if the fish pulls on it. As he sleeps with his weight upon his right hand, Santiago's...

Latest answer posted June 8, 2013, 9:43 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Old Man and the Sea

In The Old Man and the Sea, the old fisherman, Santiago, personifies the fish that he catches on his reel, imagining it has human feelings and thoughts, which make the struggle between them seem...

Latest answer posted August 2, 2020, 1:31 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Old Man and the Sea

One potential meaning behind the dream of the lions is connected to an idea of the afterlife or heaven. An old man, Santiago no longer dreams of success and strife in life. Instead, he dreams of a...

Latest answer posted April 5, 2015, 6:23 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Old Man and the Sea

Joe DiMaggio is always the "great" Joe DiMaggio to Santiago. DiMaggio is the person who, Santiago states, "does all things perfectly." Santiago emulates DiMaggio in also wanting to be the perfect...

Latest answer posted June 16, 2020, 1:17 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Old Man and the Sea

Hemingway uses much interior monologue for Santiago as he ventures out alone on the sea to battle the marlin and the sharks. Santiago talks directly to the fish, as if they are brothers, in the...

Latest answer posted October 13, 2010, 6:40 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Old Man and the Sea

Santiago is Manolin’s mentor. Manolin idolizes him and pities him at the same time. To Manolin, Santiago is a father-figure. Father-figures and mentors are initially perceived by their admirers as...

Latest answer posted January 18, 2011, 5:49 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Old Man and the Sea

In The Old Man and the Sea, Santiago is considered unlucky because he has failed to catch either the big fish. Part I of the novella is called "The Unlucky Boat" because he has gone 84 days without...

Latest answer posted April 29, 2010, 5:24 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Old Man and the Sea

Santiago and the boy live in a world of great poverty, but support each other through participation in shared fantasy. Take, for example, their daily ritual of asking about dinner and the cast...

Latest answer posted July 18, 2016, 1:08 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

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