Ode to the West Wind Questions and Answers

Ode to the West Wind

Shelley also names the West Wind the "breath of Autumn's being" in the very first line of the poem, indicating that the West Wind is also the entity that gives Autumn life. He continues to discuss...

Latest answer posted December 12, 2016 3:15 pm UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

Shelley's "Ode to the West Wind" was written within the Romantic tradition, and utilizes common Romantic tropes such as the personification of Nature and the invocation of pathetic fallacy, wherein...

Latest answer posted January 18, 2018 4:11 pm UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

I see these lines as reflecting the basic tension between Shelley's desire for transcendence, yet being bound with a sense of presence. One of the driving forces of Shelley's poem is the obsession...

Latest answer posted August 6, 2010 3:13 am UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

In this poem, Shelley is talking about how he would like his poetry to be important for long after he is dead. In most of the poem, he talks about how the wind affects nature. He says that it goes...

Latest answer posted November 30, 2009 9:47 am UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

In these last lines of "Ode to the West Wind," Shelley expresses his hope that his poetry will affect social and/or personal change in the future. The lyre is a reference to the Eolian lyre which...

Latest answer posted October 24, 2012 12:29 pm UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

In "Ode to the West Wind," Shelley conveys the message that he would like the words he writes on leaves of paper to be scattered as far and wide as the West Wind scatters the leaves that fall from...

Latest answer posted September 5, 2019 2:42 am UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

In this poem, Shelley talks about the west wind as both a creator and a destroyer. He says that as it destroys things (through storms) it is also recreating new landscapes and new life. He hopes...

Latest answer posted August 9, 2010 10:31 pm UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

The West Wind, which can be seen as symbolizing the poet's muse, scatters the dead leaves—tired old thoughts—and spreads the "winged seeds" of poetic inspiration that will come to be nurtured by...

Latest answer posted August 16, 2019 5:25 am UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

In the first canto of "Ode to the West Wind," Shelley presents the wind as a harbinger (messenger) of change. Shelley noted that the turbulent rising wind of such an autumn storm would "pour down...

Latest answer posted October 24, 2012 1:07 pm UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

In the first stanza, the speaker personifies the west wind as the "breath of Autumn's being," and then proceeds to describe the power of the wind to scatter the autumn leaves. At the end of the...

Latest answer posted February 27, 2020 10:52 am UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

The first two stanzas describe the west wind that blows the autumnal leaves along in its path. Then, in lines 7-9 it states that those leaves-bearing seeds, lie "each like a corpse within its...

Latest answer posted January 7, 2009 9:27 am UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

In these lines, the speaker—perhaps Shelley himself, as the speaker seems to be a poet or artist of some sort—seems to describe his ideas as stale or past their prime, like the withered leaves that...

Latest answer posted July 20, 2019 12:55 am UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

According to the Encyclopedia Britannica, personification is "a figure of speech in which human characteristics are attributed to an abstract quality, animal, or inanimate object." In the famous...

Latest answer posted October 29, 2019 12:45 am UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

Well, look no further than the first line for the first example of a metaphor in this excellent poem. Remember that a metaphor is a comparison, where one object is compared to something else,...

Latest answer posted March 15, 2011 7:10 pm UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

The figure of speech used in Shelley's description of the Mediterranean awakening with the advent of the west wind is personification. It is also a poetic conceit (and rather an extreme one). The...

Latest answer posted March 28, 2016 10:14 pm UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

To answer this question, it best to turn to Shelley's beliefs. Though the son of a vastly wealthy family, Shelley's ideas were revolutionary for his time. He supported the ideals of the French...

Latest answer posted August 5, 2020 11:47 am UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

I think Percy Bysshe Shelley is being unquestioningly optimistic in his poem "Ode to the West Wind." The early sections of the poem repeatedly reference the seasons. The west wind plays the role of...

Latest answer posted August 9, 2019 11:27 pm UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

The trumpet has a long history of being associated with military strength, and often it has been used as a symbol of power and victory. The speaker of this poem appeals to the west wind to share...

Latest answer posted June 4, 2020 2:29 pm UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

You have quoted the third stanza from this terrific poem in its entirety. Of course, there is always a danger of just looking at specific parts of a poem separately and not in the context of the...

Latest answer posted August 19, 2011 8:51 pm UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

The rhyme scheme of the first section of Shelley's "Ode to the West Wind" is ABA BCB CDC DED EE. The word "hear" at the end of the last line is intended to be an approximate rhyme with "everywhere"...

Latest answer posted June 22, 2013 5:35 pm UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

In this canto of "Ode to the West Wind," Shelley supposes that if he were like a leaf, cloud, or wave, he too could take part in the regenerative processes of death and life in nature. In the first...

Latest answer posted October 23, 2012 3:56 pm UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

Some lines in the 70 line poem “Ode to the West Wind” (by English writer Percy Bysshe Shelley) that deal with nature, senses, and emotion include the following: Nature In the very first line,...

Latest answer posted March 30, 2015 1:06 am UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

Simply put, in the timeline of life, winter comes before spring. As soon as winter is finished, that means that spring is coming next, not far behind. For the entire poem, Shelley has been...

Latest answer posted April 14, 2009 4:52 am UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

You have quoted the second stanza of this poem. It can often be hard to follow the line of argument in such poems, but key to realise is that in this stanza, the wind's effect on the clouds is...

Latest answer posted August 16, 2011 8:11 pm UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

In the first three cantos of the poem "Ode to the West Wind," Percy Bysshe Shelley describes the effects of the fierce autumnal west wind on the land, air, and sea, and in the final two cantos, he...

Latest answer posted December 26, 2019 3:48 pm UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

Shelley's speaker identifies so strongly with the west wind because he wishes for his ideas to blow around the world with the same force that the west wind uses to scatter leaves around the earth....

Latest answer posted March 18, 2018 8:54 pm UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

This poem of course amazingly captures the spirit and majesty of the West Wind through a series of incredible descriptions, depicting the Wind as both "Destroyer and Preserver" before imprecating...

Latest answer posted February 28, 2011 11:46 pm UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

Shelley's "Ode to the West Wind" uses symbolism throughout to convey its primary theme of the sublime power of nature. You are correct in stating that the West Wind is used symbolically, but it is...

Latest answer posted January 23, 2018 8:48 pm UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

In the 4th section, he says that if her were a leaf, or a cloud, or a wave, he could be blown by, flown to, or participate in, the power of the west wind. He could "share the impulse of they...

Latest answer posted February 12, 2009 11:32 pm UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

"The trumpet of a prophecy! O, Wind/ If Winter comes, can Spring be far behind?" The closing lines of Shelley's "Ode to the West Wind" highlights several themes of Romanticism as well. One...

Latest answer posted July 1, 2009 9:03 pm UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

In his "Ode to the West Wind," Shelley describes nature as a spiritual force that spreads itself across the planet. He addresses nature as a "wild spirit," depicting it as a moving force that...

Latest answer posted January 1, 2020 2:16 pm UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

The speaker of this poem wishes for the Western Wind to grant him a new creative life, just as it does with nature. He says, Make me thy lyre, even as the forest is:What if my leaves are falling...

Latest answer posted March 3, 2019 6:28 pm UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

In his poem “Ode to the West Wind,” Percy Bysshe Shelley presents the theme of regeneration in a number of ways, including the following: In lines 8-12, the speaker implies that the seeds buried...

Latest answer posted January 5, 2012 2:06 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Ode to the West Wind

In Shelley's "Ode to the West Wind," the wind comes from autumn itself. Shelley calls it the "breath of Autumn's being." In the poem, Shelley moves from emotions of mourning to emotions of hope,...

Latest answer posted January 31, 2016 12:20 am UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

As a Romantic poet, Percy Bysshe Shelley wrote about many natural phenomena. His "Ode to the West Wind" was inspired by an autumn storm that caused the poet to consider the linkage between the...

Latest answer posted July 1, 2010 2:47 am UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

Essentially, this famous ode is an extended apostrophe to the powerful west wind, that Shelley refers to as "thou breath of Autumn's being." After addressing the wind and describing its effects,...

Latest answer posted December 30, 2010 9:13 am UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

The speaker prays to the west wind to make him its lyre. A lyre is an ancient musical instrument, kind of like a small U-shaped harp. Lyres had special resonance for poets such as Shelley, as in...

Latest answer posted July 22, 2019 6:46 am UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

The entire poem is about the destructive and regenerative power of nature and how poetry itself is like nature: particularly like the ebb and flow, death and life: the cycle of nature. Shelley sees...

Latest answer posted March 1, 2010 7:09 am UTC

1 educator answer

Ode to the West Wind

In these lines, we see an example of apostrophe and simile (and, thus, metaphor—I'll explain in a moment). The speaker addresses the west wind directly, speaking to it and calling it "Thou," and...

Latest answer posted March 27, 2018 8:13 pm UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

In Section 2 of Percy Bysshe Shelley's "Ode to the West Wind," the poet continues his description of the powerful West Wind by describing its effect on the clouds. The wind bears along the clouds...

Latest answer posted June 21, 2019 1:30 am UTC

1 educator answer

Ode to the West Wind

In Shelley's "Ode to the West Wind," the wind is an agent of change, a "wild spirit," both "destroyer and preserver." When Shelley writes that the leaves from the wind "Are driven, like ghosts from...

Latest answer posted February 5, 2016 1:01 am UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

In the first stanza of the first section, the speaker refers to the "breath of Autumn's being" and although the wind is described as "unseen," the speaker can see the effect of the wind's presence...

Latest answer posted May 15, 2013 8:02 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Ode to the West Wind

Romantic poets felt a strong connection to nature, had idealistic views of childhood, emphasized strong emotions through verse, and often thought of themselves as poet-prophets, voices expressing...

Latest answer posted November 13, 2018 1:02 pm UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

The first stanza describes the effects of the west wind upon the landscape in autumn, as it tears down the old leaves and scatters them. In the first eight lines the theme of death and decay is...

Latest answer posted April 9, 2013 9:36 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Ode to the West Wind

Both of these poems, like many of Shelley's poems, start off by describing a natural event and then use this event as a way to discuss the way that nature can powerfully impact and transform the...

Latest answer posted April 17, 2011 8:22 pm UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

Shelley embraces much in way of Romantic thought in his alignment of natural images and political agendas. In writing the closing to his "Defence of Poetry," Shelley argues that "Poets are the...

Latest answer posted December 25, 2013 1:33 pm UTC

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Ode to the West Wind

In Shelley's Ode, the west wind, I would argue, is symbolic of a primal force that is both the "destroyer and preserver" it is called, but also a life-giving element that spurs human creativity....

Latest answer posted June 4, 2018 5:07 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Ode to the West Wind

The poem is a kind of appeal to the west wind to unite with the poet. When Shelley writes, “Be thou me, impetuous one!”, it can be understood in several ways. Shelley could be wishing that the...

Latest answer posted August 5, 2018 11:57 am UTC

2 educator answers

Ode to the West Wind

In Shelley's "Ode to the West Wind," "aery" is ethereal: light, intangible, refined, of the heavens. This simply describes the wind. The context of the line follows: Angels [messengers] of rain...

Latest answer posted April 18, 2010 11:36 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Ode to the West Wind

The speaker directly addresses the west wind, which he calls "wild," calling it both a "Destroyer and preserver" and asking it to "hear" him. In the fifth and final section, we get the biggest...

Latest answer posted June 21, 2019 7:56 pm UTC

1 educator answer

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