Ode to a Nightingale Questions and Answers

Ode to a Nightingale

In these lines, the speaker expresses his desire to join the nightingale and fly far away from the human world. To do this, he doesn't need to get a ride from Bacchus, the god of wine; he can fly...

Latest answer posted June 15, 2020 7:34 am UTC

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Ode to a Nightingale

To understand this stanza of Keats' "Ode to a Nightingale" you have to go back to the beginning and understand what he says he is going to try to do in creating this poem. He is feeling very...

Latest answer posted May 16, 2013 2:54 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Ode to a Nightingale

The first stanza represents the speaker's fraught emotional state. The sweet song of the nightingale induces a sense of longing, making the speaker feel numb as if he'd only recently taken hemlock,...

Latest answer posted February 18, 2019 7:55 am UTC

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Ode to a Nightingale

Keats' "Ode to a Nightingale" is full of sensuous details. In fact, it is the sensuousness of his imagery that makes him such a great poet. Here are some examples of that bountiful sensuous...

Latest answer posted March 8, 2016 7:58 am UTC

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Ode to a Nightingale

In the poem "Ode to a Nightingale" by John Keats, the poet expresses a Romantic nostalgia for the past and alludes to it several times. He ties this in with ideas of beauty, joy, calm and pastoral...

Latest answer posted March 23, 2010 10:42 pm UTC

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Ode to a Nightingale

Stanza 1: The speaker opens by establishing his own mood. He feels that an "opiate" has dulled his senses, and he is left feeling numb and drowsy. The speaker addresses the nightingale of the...

Latest answer posted April 27, 2020 1:43 am UTC

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Ode to a Nightingale

One could argue that the main theme of "Ode to a Nightingale" is the way in which the joys of nature and the exercise of the imagination can only ever offer a partial glimpse of eternity. Both...

Latest answer posted January 31, 2020 5:36 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Ode to a Nightingale

When one thinks of Romantic poetry, the first element that comes to mind is a focus on nature and a connection to nature. This is very clear in the poem as Keats focuses on the nightingale. With...

Latest answer posted July 21, 2020 5:47 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Ode to a Nightingale

At the beginning of the poem Keats states that he feels that his heart aches and that he is experiencing a "drowsy numbness" as if he had drunk hemlock or an opiate such as laudanum but that he...

Latest answer posted October 12, 2012 4:47 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Ode to a Nightingale

The speaker goes right into his troubled mental state, noting that his heart aches but that he is also slipping into a state of numbness as if he's ingested an opiate. He sinks "Lethe-wards"—this...

Latest answer posted June 10, 2015 1:13 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Ode to a Nightingale

The poet admires the nightingale's song because the bird sings with "full-throated ease." The poet recognizes a freedom of creativity and art in the song. In the third stanza, the poet notes that...

Latest answer posted September 23, 2016 9:55 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Ode to a Nightingale

In the poem "Ode to a Nightingale" by John Keats, the haunting song of a nightingale causes the poet to receive a tantalizing glimpse of an ideal world. Keats contrasts this with the real world in...

Latest answer posted July 2, 2020 4:34 pm UTC

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Ode to a Nightingale

The characteristics most often associated with the Romantic movement are a focus on intense emotion, the experience of the individual, and a glorification of nature. As soon as the poem begins, the...

Latest answer posted February 17, 2020 9:03 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Ode to a Nightingale

As with all Keats's odes, the "Ode To A Nightingale" explores the relationship between a number of antitheses: art and life; the immanent and the transcendent; and the permanent and the mutable....

Latest answer posted October 14, 2017 9:15 am UTC

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Ode to a Nightingale

“Ode to a Nightingale” (1819) is a Horatian Ode written primarily in iambic pentameter. The poem, composed after John Keats heard a nightingale outside his window, is a consideration of death, the...

Latest answer posted December 4, 2013 1:57 am UTC

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Ode to a Nightingale

The basic idea in keats's Ode to A Nightingale is the conflict between the Ideal and the Real, time and timelessness, mortality and an escape into permanence. The real world for keats is...

Latest answer posted September 21, 2012 12:52 am UTC

4 educator answers

Ode to a Nightingale

The speaker wants to join the nightingale in the woods and forget his own troubles and sorrows. The speaker perceives the woods as a beautiful, tranquil place devoid of worries and death. In his...

Latest answer posted August 20, 2011 6:39 am UTC

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Ode to a Nightingale

Fade far away, dissolve, and quite forgetWhat thou among the leaves hast never known,The weariness, the fever, and the fretHere, where men sit and hear each other groan;Where palsy shakes a few,...

Latest answer posted December 29, 2015 10:30 pm UTC

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Ode to a Nightingale

The poet does not really believe the bird he hears is immortal. He is using what is termed "poetic license." Poetry does not have to be literally true. This is also called a "poetic conceit." He is...

Latest answer posted March 9, 2015 12:14 am UTC

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Ode to a Nightingale

At the beginning of his "Ode to a Nightingale," the speaker (Keats) says that he would like to escape from the world of reality. He wishes he could get drunk but, since he has nothing alcoholic...

Latest answer posted October 15, 2012 3:11 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Ode to a Nightingale

As with any question that asks you to explain a certain part of a text or a poem, it is vital that you have a look at this excerpt within the context of the poem as a whole and not just try to...

Latest answer posted September 8, 2011 9:04 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Ode to a Nightingale

Keats expresses a very strong reaction to the song of the nightingale. His heart aches and a drowsy numbness overwhelms him as if he had drunk poison hemlock or an opiate. Then he explains that...

Latest answer posted August 12, 2012 3:13 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Ode to a Nightingale

An annotation comments on or explains a text or a part of a text (Merriam-Webster). In this case, the goal is to comment on or explain the following lines from "Ode to a Nightingale" by John...

Latest answer posted July 16, 2018 11:58 am UTC

1 educator answer

Ode to a Nightingale

In this poem, Keats expresses his longing to fly away with the nightingale in equal freedom. He yearns for "a draught of vintage" which would contain all the beauties and pleasures of the earth and...

Latest answer posted April 15, 2018 9:00 am UTC

2 educator answers

Ode to a Nightingale

John Keats was dying from tuberculosis when he wrote this poem, indeed, when he wrote most of his poetry. The disease was called consumption in Keats's time, and that was a good name for it. The...

Latest answer posted September 6, 2011 2:01 am UTC

1 educator answer

Ode to a Nightingale

With regard to John Keats' poem, "Ode to a Nightingale," there are several literary techniques he employs. Keats' employs a vast number of literary devices to make his poetry more alive to its...

Latest answer posted January 28, 2011 7:15 am UTC

1 educator answer

Ode to a Nightingale

Like William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge, John Keats is often identified as a romantic poet. One of the most distinctive aspects about romantic poetry is, of course, its treatment of...

Latest answer posted November 29, 2019 4:55 am UTC

3 educator answers

Ode to a Nightingale

The premise of "Ode to a Nightingale" is pretty straightforward: the poet hears the beautiful song of the bird at dusk, and the sound causes him to reflect on his own mortality, and the bonds of...

Latest answer posted April 17, 2016 1:53 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Ode to a Nightingale

In "Ode to a Nightingale," Keats wants to chill. He is seeking refuge from the pressures of life and the thoughts of growing old, getting sick, and dying. He wants to escape from his mind for...

Latest answer posted August 24, 2011 12:08 am UTC

1 educator answer

Ode to a Nightingale

Keats opens his "Ode to a Nightingale" by wishing he had a whole beaker of wine, so that he could get drunk and escape from the real world where there is so much unhappiness and where so many...

Latest answer posted October 22, 2012 10:06 am UTC

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Ode to a Nightingale

Forlorn! the very word is like a bell To toll me back from thee to my sole self! Adieu! the fancy cannot cheat so well As she is famed to do, deceiving elf. Adieu! adieu! thy plaintive anthem fades...

Latest answer posted October 24, 2012 11:20 am UTC

1 educator answer

Ode to a Nightingale

When you're analyzing poetry, it's a good idea to think of the poem as having a speaker who is not the poet. The speaker in "Ode to a Nightingale" opens the poem by declaring that he would like to...

Latest answer posted October 15, 2016 1:33 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Ode to a Nightingale

In these lines the speaker, Keats himself, is only expressing the wish that he had something to drink and that he could get thoroughly intoxicated. Keats was a young man, but he was developing a...

Latest answer posted September 21, 2013 10:34 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Ode to a Nightingale

In "Ode to a Nightingale" by John Keats, the poet is mesmerized by the beauty of the nightingale's song. Keats contrasts the euphoria inherent in the song of the bird with his own unhappiness,...

Latest answer posted September 4, 2019 5:45 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Ode to a Nightingale

In "Ode to a Nightingale," Keats (the speaker) wishes to be like the nightingale because it has no worry or no concept of mortality. Keats was always painfully aware of death. He feared dying at a...

Latest answer posted August 16, 2012 3:52 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Ode to a Nightingale

With regard to John Keats' poem, "Ode to a Nightingale," and the author's evolution of thought, he begins the poem by stating that he feels as if he is under the influence of a drug: hemlock or an...

Latest answer posted February 11, 2011 6:28 am UTC

1 educator answer

Ode to a Nightingale

The speakers of both poems are deeply moved by the song of a bird. In Keats's case it is a nightingale, and in Shelley's case it is a skylark. Keats, however, unlike Shelley, goes into a state of...

Latest answer posted December 26, 2018 3:29 am UTC

2 educator answers

Ode to a Nightingale

As a Romantic poet, Keats perceived the imagination as a critical authority that intuitively connects with the transcendent, or those things that are beyond the ken of humans. And, through the...

Latest answer posted February 8, 2013 11:06 am UTC

1 educator answer

Ode to a Nightingale

Keats is stating that, in his opinion, nightingales have been alive and present throughout human history. "Thou wast not born for death, immortal Bird!" He is supporting this opinion with various...

Latest answer posted October 19, 2012 6:16 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Ode to a Nightingale

In "Ode to a Nightingale," Keats finds himself torn between a number of polarities: the temporal and the eternal, the spiritual and the material, and life and death. The song of the nightingale is...

Latest answer posted February 10, 2018 8:44 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Ode to a Nightingale

I suppose one of the ways we can answer this question is by looking at the content and the themes of this excellent ode. There are clear thematic links between this ode and other odes by Keats,...

Latest answer posted April 17, 2011 8:06 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Ode to a Nightingale

The first thought in Keats' melancholy "Ode to a Nightingale" is "drowsy numbness" that pains the speaker's senses. Keats is assumed to be speaking for himself in this Ode. He is so metaphorically...

Latest answer posted February 13, 2010 11:14 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Ode to a Nightingale

At the end of stanza 1, the nightingale sings a summer song. As the speaker puts it, the bird Singest of summer in full-throated ease The nightingale, sitting amid the shadows, sings...

Latest answer posted July 6, 2019 10:41 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Ode to a Nightingale

Much like other Romantic poets, John Keats seeks solace in his poetry. His ode, or elaborate lyric poem expressive of exalted emotion, addresses the solace and transience of nature, along with...

Latest answer posted August 6, 2012 6:40 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Ode to a Nightingale

This statement has a lot of truth in it, and there is certainly an element to which this poem represents the desire of Keats to be part of an eternal beauty that is represented by the song of the...

Latest answer posted February 8, 2013 3:42 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Ode to a Nightingale

In the second stanza of "Ode to a Nightingale," the speaker wishes that he could "leave the world unseen, / And with thee [the nightingale] fade away into the forest dim." In the third stanza, he...

Latest answer posted August 23, 2019 11:26 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Ode to a Nightingale

The nightgale's song is best thought of as a kind of ethereal, other-worldly music of great beauty that can never be fully understood or embraced by man. There is also the sense that man, bound by...

Latest answer posted February 3, 2016 1:44 am UTC

1 educator answer

Ode to a Nightingale

The stanza from which "embalmed darkness" is taken reads as follows: I cannot see what flowers are at my feet, Nor what soft incense hangs upon the boughs, But, in embalmed...

Latest answer posted September 17, 2013 4:30 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Ode to a Nightingale

The speaker, listening to the beautiful song of the nightingale, wants to forget all the problems that go with human consciousness. Keats would like to fly away and be amid the beautiful flowers...

Latest answer posted July 6, 2019 8:54 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Ode to a Nightingale

There seems little doubt that Keats is indeed referring to his dying, consumptive brother, Tom. At the same time, Keats is making a general point, exploring the distinction between the occasional...

Latest answer posted November 26, 2017 10:29 am UTC

2 educator answers

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