A Narrow Fellow in the Grass Questions and Answers

A Narrow Fellow in the Grass

There are many figures of speech in this poem. Even the central phrase, a "narrow fellow," can be described in various terms. First, this is an example of circumlocution—Dickinson does not say...

Latest answer posted October 24, 2018 1:34 pm UTC

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A Narrow Fellow in the Grass

There are some excellent examples of alliteration being used to give emphasis to the poem's themes in the second stanza. Writing about snakes very frequently uses alliteration on the "s" sound to...

Latest answer posted January 5, 2019 9:01 pm UTC

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A Narrow Fellow in the Grass

Most people, when happening upon a snake in the grass, are startled. But note that in the first stanza, the speaker calls the snake a "fellow"; this is an innocuous term for a boy or a man. The...

Latest answer posted August 4, 2018 3:03 pm UTC

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A Narrow Fellow in the Grass

Dickinson's meter is famously irregular, but one way to think of it is as a form of ballad meter, which uses alternating lines of iambic tetrameter and iambic trimeter. There are examples in the...

Latest answer posted January 26, 2019 1:44 pm UTC

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A Narrow Fellow in the Grass

I do not know that Emily Dickinson in "A Narrow Fellow in the Grass" does refer to the snake as a friend. You may have read "boy" as different from the poet, as well. ("Yet...

Latest answer posted October 9, 2008 8:10 am UTC

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A Narrow Fellow in the Grass

Emily Dickinson writes from the perspective of a male speaker who stumbles across a snake. Remember, the poet is not always the speaker of a poem. In this case, we know the speaker is a male (who...

Latest answer posted August 10, 2018 5:26 am UTC

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A Narrow Fellow in the Grass

Emily Dickinson was a master at utilizing punctuation to increase the ambiguity of her poems. "A Narrow Fellow in the Grass" is a perfect example of this rule, as Dickinson employs her trademark...

Latest answer posted October 5, 2016 8:20 pm UTC

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A Narrow Fellow in the Grass

One of the great strengths of Emily Dickinson's poetry is its spareness and how in very few words she can evoke a particular feeling or universal observation. She was a close observer of the...

Latest answer posted October 27, 2018 12:15 pm UTC

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A Narrow Fellow in the Grass

Checking out some of the scholarship eNotes provides on this poems validates ane exands upon Jamie’s insigtful response. According to one critic, the poem is on the one hand realisitic depicting...

Latest answer posted September 22, 2007 11:49 pm UTC

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A Narrow Fellow in the Grass

I think that you could argue this a few of different ways. You could say that the phrase "narrow fellow" is a metaphor or you could say that it is personification. But I would argue that this is...

Latest answer posted February 14, 2010 11:46 am UTC

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A Narrow Fellow in the Grass

Remember that a large part of the Romantic movement involves nature. Imagination, the supernatural, the individual over society as a whole, and emotion as opposed to reason are other aspects of...

Latest answer posted March 21, 2008 4:55 am UTC

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A Narrow Fellow in the Grass

I think that there is no question that the "narrow fellow" that the speaker is talking about is a snake. You can see that at a few different places in the poem. The first place where that seems...

Latest answer posted February 23, 2010 6:47 am UTC

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A Narrow Fellow in the Grass

It's difficult to say whether this poem about the experience of coming upon a snake in the grass is actually taken from Emily Dickinson's real life. The poet spent much of her time in seclusion in...

Latest answer posted February 28, 2016 12:53 am UTC

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A Narrow Fellow in the Grass

This is one of Emily Dickinson's more intriguing poems, written in six quatrains with a regular rhyme in the second and fourth lines alone. The majority (though not all) of the rhythm is iambic,...

Latest answer posted May 20, 2011 12:48 am UTC

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A Narrow Fellow in the Grass

In the poem "A Narrow Fellow in the Grass," Emily Dickinson describes a figure in nature as though it is a thin man. She asks readers if they have "met him." As the poem continues, Dickinson talks...

Latest answer posted October 30, 2019 4:52 pm UTC

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A Narrow Fellow in the Grass

In the poem, the speaker describes a snake slithering through the grass - what is looks like, how it moves, and how it reacts to those around it. The speaker does not stop there, though - she also...

Latest answer posted April 14, 2012 4:32 pm UTC

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A Narrow Fellow in the Grass

With all other creatures the speaker has a certain natural affinity. She cheerfully tells us of her cordial feelings for what she describes as "Nature's People." And she's pretty sure that her...

Latest answer posted September 20, 2019 10:49 am UTC

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A Narrow Fellow in the Grass

While the answer provided regarding the titling of Dickinson's poetry is correct, one could look at the poem in a very Romantic fashion (similar to the one from which Dickinson wrote). Emily...

Latest answer posted October 5, 2011 10:13 am UTC

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