Much Ado About Nothing Questions and Answers

Much Ado About Nothing

My favorite character of the play, Dogberry, is introduced in this scene. Dogberry, as the town constable, is telling the night watchmen to be on the lookout for any mischief or trouble as they...

Latest answer posted June 21, 2009 10:32 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Your original question contained more than one question. Please remember that enotes does not allow you to ask multiple questions. I have edited your question accordingly. Act II scene 3 and Act...

Latest answer posted February 9, 2011 6:28 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

In act 5, how would you tidy up the plot on stage and comment on how Shakespeare did that? This is a very complex question indeed, because the play is full of loose ends at this point, and to...

Latest answer posted February 5, 2007 11:26 am UTC

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Much Ado About Nothing

This scene is of course the parallel scene to the prior gulling of Benedick, where he is made to believe that Beatrice is desperately in love with him. The immense humour in this scene lies in the...

Latest answer posted January 10, 2012 4:10 pm UTC

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Much Ado About Nothing

This is quite a large question, so I will focus on one of the deceptions and how it is finally resolved. The centerpiece of deception in the main plot is the mistaking of Hero's gentlewoman,...

Latest answer posted August 29, 2010 8:49 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

To answer this, I would first have to consider what the issues are in Much Ado. There are issues such as gender roles, class roles, trust and distrust, love and marriage, reality versus what...

Latest answer posted November 29, 2007 8:36 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

You have picked an excellent act to talk about the character of Claudio in this play. Claudio is presented as young and earnest, a warrior who has accomplished "in the figure of a lamb the feats of...

Latest answer posted January 24, 2011 7:24 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Most film versions of Shakespeare's plays have to leave something out...either due to time-constraints or because film directors and screenplay writers are afraid modern audiences aren't going to...

Latest answer posted February 18, 2008 10:50 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Leonato's initial reaction to Claudio's, Don Pedro's, and Don John's accusal of Hero's virginity is one of great dismay. Feeling that Hero has dishonored his family and his legacy, he wishes she...

Latest answer posted April 2, 2012 9:04 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Leonato is the Governor of Messina, the father of Hero, and the uncle of Beatrice. It is at Leonato’s home where the action is set; he is second in power only to Don Pedro.

Latest answer posted December 25, 2007 12:50 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

Shakespeare establishes the difference between the two pairs of lovers or the two couples very clearly. Hero and Claudio, a young fair maiden and a heroic soldier fall in love in the traditional...

Latest answer posted April 11, 2008 9:05 am UTC

3 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

These Dogberryisms are Malapropisms, or mispoken homophones (soundalikes). You've heard them, mainly when you were a kid: "I pledge allegiance to the flag...one nation...invisible" when you mean...

Latest answer posted November 17, 2009 11:48 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

The primary belief in the play regarding the sexes is that there are conventional roles for men and women in society. A woman's honor is based on her chastity, while a man's honor is based on his...

Latest answer posted August 26, 2008 10:34 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

By Act 2, it is revealed that Don John is the villain, aided by Borachio and Conrade. Don John is actually a fairly evil guy. His philosophy seems to be that if he isn’t happy, no one else should...

Latest answer posted September 24, 2015 4:14 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

My philosophy is that any interpretation can be right as long as it is backed with support. There is a difference between original and creative theories and just plain misunderstanding a text. I...

Latest answer posted July 29, 2011 12:45 am UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

The portrayal of Dogberry by Michael Keaton in Branagh's version of this play immediately comes to mind. Keaton played it perfectly: Dogberry is lacking in manners, refinement,...

Latest answer posted April 24, 2007 12:48 am UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing has a great scene in it where Benedick's friends are conning him into believing that Beatrice loves him. All of Benedick's and Beatrice's friends know that the...

Latest answer posted November 12, 2013 5:17 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

I think one aspect of villainy that hasn't changed is their ability to fool, manipulate and trick others. Though interestingly in this case, I think Don John's success in tricking Don Pedro and...

Latest answer posted January 29, 2011 4:21 pm UTC

5 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

The Taming of the Shrew would work well as a comparison/contrast with Much Ado because of the similarities in characterization and theme. If you want a slightly more interesting comparison, The...

Latest answer posted November 28, 2009 7:14 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

It is believed that Shakespeare wrote Much Ado About Nothing between 1598 and 1599. A published version of the play appeared in 1600. Will Kemp, an actor who is known to have played Dogberry, left...

Latest answer posted September 20, 2020 2:05 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Poor Hero takes quite a hit when it comes to her honor and reputation. Claudio is quick to believe the worst of her, as in this scene (4.1) where he angrily dismisses her: Out on thee! Seeming! I...

Latest answer posted October 8, 2007 12:25 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

One key part of the plot revolves around Don John"s framing Hero to trick his brother Don Pedro and Claudio, her fiancé, into thinking she was unfaithful. When this succeeds, those who believe her...

Latest answer posted November 2, 2018 3:04 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

The play, Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare, can be a confusing play. Being one of Shakespeare's comedies, it relies on the people in the play for the humor. When your teacher says...

Latest answer posted February 6, 2012 2:41 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

I'm afraid my version of the play doesn't have a scene 5 in Act IV, but as for Act V, Lenato explores and explains the pain of love there. To be specific, he articulates just how painful it is to...

Latest answer posted May 2, 2008 10:10 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

amy-lepore raises an excellent point here that is worthy of further discussion. Claudio's willingness to believe rumours about his true love that he has spent so many lines of iambic pentameters...

Latest answer posted June 3, 2010 10:53 am UTC

3 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

This play is a romantic comedy, although it does have some moments that are more serious. The basic plot of play is that four men have come to the house of Leonato, governor of Messina in Siciliy....

Latest answer posted January 4, 2010 11:59 pm UTC

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Much Ado About Nothing

To be honest, there are so many deceptions and disguises that it might be easier to identify when there is not deception (seriously). John spreads lies about Hero. Claudius denounces Hero for not...

Latest answer posted March 14, 2007 2:29 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Could you provide a little bit more information regarding what sparked this question? Beatrice accepts Benedick at the end of the play, and jokes about having (or not having one) a husband often,...

Latest answer posted June 8, 2010 7:56 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

One aspect of social and family life that is critical to understand in order to see Much Ado About Nothing as convincing for an Elizabethan audience is that girls were educated to be chaste.In...

Latest answer posted July 2, 2012 6:38 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Remember, first of all, that Hero was not the originator of this plan. She agreed to it, with as much say as she had, but the plan was that of the Friar's and created mostly on behalf of Leonato's...

Latest answer posted February 19, 2008 6:41 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

At the start of the play, Benedick is a confirmed bachelor; he swears he will never marry, and has no real interest in finding a partner in life. He is a soldier, a man's man, and only interested...

Latest answer posted December 8, 2008 6:26 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Yes, a more equal relationship between the men and women is possible, largely because Hero and Claudio are together, and because their marriage heals a very harsh crack in male/female...

Latest answer posted March 14, 2007 11:29 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Oh, this play is so much fun that there are many lines that are important because they show Shakespeare's wit and the playfulness in love that can happen. That said, I'm going to go with one of the...

Latest answer posted March 6, 2007 12:17 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

If you sum up all of the emotions displayed by Claudio in the play, perhaps "passion" would be the nuance to which you refer. Claudio is extreme in his emotions. He falls in love with Hero very...

Latest answer posted November 8, 2009 8:20 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Repartee, or word play, often feeds the comedy of this romantic romp.  Here is an example, from  Act I, Scene I:Beatrice: I wonder that you will still be talking, Signior Benedick,...

Latest answer posted July 27, 2007 2:28 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Beatrice has a different manner of speaking to all of the characters in this memorable comedy, each of which gives us a glimpse into her relationships. With Hero, Beatrice is the mildest and most...

Latest answer posted April 13, 2018 9:17 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

Does he make it clear? Absolutely? He pretty much swears that he'll use nothing else late in Act I.Does he do so? No. He manufactures a few obstacles and spreads a few lies, but really, as villains...

Latest answer posted May 1, 2008 2:47 am UTC

1 educator answer

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