Much Ado About Nothing Questions and Answers

Much Ado About Nothing

Illusion versus reality is a major theme in literature, including Shakespeare’s works. As humans, we can only make judgments based on what we observe, which is always limited. There is more going...

Latest answer posted April 26, 2016 10:04 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Poor Hero takes quite a hit when it comes to her honor and reputation. Claudio is quick to believe the worst of her, as in this scene (4.1) where he angrily dismisses her: Out on thee! Seeming! I...

Latest answer posted October 8, 2007 12:25 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Remember, first of all, that Hero was not the originator of this plan. She agreed to it, with as much say as she had, but the plan was that of the Friar's and created mostly on behalf of Leonato's...

Latest answer posted February 19, 2008 6:41 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Gender is one of the central themes in Shakespeare's comedy Much Ado About Nothing. In Beatrice and Benedick's squabbles, the differences between the genders are illuminated. Benedick initially...

Latest answer posted May 19, 2018 2:49 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

In act 1, scene 3, the audience is first introduced to Don John, Don Pedro's illegitimate brother, and his plan to swipe at his brother by hurting Claudio and Hero's chance for happiness. The...

Latest answer posted January 12, 2020 9:15 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Much Ado About Nothing features two love stories: Benedick and Beatrice, and Claudio and Hero. When the play opens, we learn that Beatrice and Benedick are engaged in a battle of wits. They often...

Latest answer posted April 8, 2020 3:09 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

One of the main themes of the play is appearance and reality, what things appear to be versus what they really are. This play is all about deception, and part of that deception is eavesdropping....

Latest answer posted March 16, 2010 1:12 am UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

Much Ado About Nothing, by William Shakespeare, has a plot and a subplot, either of which would be excellent material for a modern spin. The subplot involves Beatrice and Benedick, two witty young...

Latest answer posted June 25, 2011 11:55 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

One thing we can see of Hero's thoughts from the text is that she thinks Claudio has gone mad, or insane. She thinks he is insane to be hurtling such wild accusations at her, as we see in her line,...

Latest answer posted June 28, 2012 7:40 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Shakespeare portrays Don John as a scoundrel meant to cause mischief and harm from the onset of the play. The Dramatis Personae classifies Don John as "Don Pedro's bastard brother," letting the...

Latest answer posted March 30, 2014 4:03 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Don John is the villain of Much Ado About Nothing. By all appearances, he is sullen and quiet. When Leonato welcomes him into his home, Don John says that he is “not of many words.” Beatrice says...

Latest answer posted March 7, 2016 6:24 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

You need to read this question and think what it is that the language does to contribute to the drama in this scene - how is language used to establish themes, relationships and character in this...

Latest answer posted April 9, 2009 1:29 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

I directed this play last summer, and I would have a very difficult time choosing just one favorite line...or even 10 favorites! :) This is truly one of his best, in my humble opinion. It is fun,...

Latest answer posted December 4, 2007 6:12 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

Your original question contained more than one question. Please remember that enotes does not allow you to ask multiple questions. I have edited your question accordingly. Act II scene 3 and Act...

Latest answer posted February 9, 2011 6:28 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Your question seems to point towards a very interesting aspect of Shakespeare's comedies: the way in which there seems to be a very thin dividing line between a "comedy" and a "tragedy." You might...

Latest answer posted February 22, 2011 11:18 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

One of the reasons the play is considered a comedy is that it is about relationships and humorous tricks characters play on one another, as opposed to murder and treachery like a tragedy such as...

Latest answer posted January 13, 2013 4:53 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

To answer this, I would first have to consider what the issues are in Much Ado. There are issues such as gender roles, class roles, trust and distrust, love and marriage, reality versus what...

Latest answer posted November 29, 2007 8:36 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Leonato's initial reaction to Claudio's, Don Pedro's, and Don John's accusal of Hero's virginity is one of great dismay. Feeling that Hero has dishonored his family and his legacy, he wishes she...

Latest answer posted April 2, 2012 9:04 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

The initial sparring match between Benedick and Beatrice introduces a number of key themes and motifs that will come to dominate the rest of the play, as well as introducing their characters....

Latest answer posted March 21, 2009 9:17 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Well, first, if your question is meant to imply that Shakespeare wrote in something other than Modern English, you would be incorrect! Shakespeare wrote in 100% Modern English. He just happened...

Latest answer posted August 10, 2010 8:45 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

amy-lepore raises an excellent point here that is worthy of further discussion. Claudio's willingness to believe rumours about his true love that he has spent so many lines of iambic pentameters...

Latest answer posted June 3, 2010 10:53 am UTC

3 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

The question was asked, " Could the message embedded in the final celebration be that: Jealousy and Honor can have tragic consequences and that in the end, good always overcome evil?" And " What do...

Latest answer posted February 7, 2007 12:24 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Beatrice believes Hero has been "belied" (BEATRICE:O, on my soul, my cousin is belied!). The reason she feels this way is because she has been her "bedfellow" for the past year (with the exception...

Latest answer posted April 2, 2012 8:57 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

This Act contains two important scenes that are vital in terms of the plot of this excellent Shakespearian comedy. Act IV scene 1 features the long-awaited marriage of Hero to Claudio, except that...

Latest answer posted March 11, 2011 8:03 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

The scene takes a slightly more serious tone with the setting before the marriage altar. Lies and rumor prevail, however. Claudio rejects Hero, and Leonato believes Claudio guilty of taking Hero's...

Latest answer posted March 28, 2011 3:32 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

I believe that you are talking about Act II, Scene 3. In this scene, Don Pedro and Leonato are trying to trick Benedick into thinking that Beatrice is in love with him. So, what they say is going...

Latest answer posted January 18, 2010 7:17 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Well, I have always found Sir Toby Belch in Twelfth Night to be a hilarious character. I love his feud with Malvolio and the way that he "plays" on the stupidity of Sir Andrew Augecheek throughout...

Latest answer posted January 29, 2011 4:23 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Although the play is a comedy, it is a more sophisticated comedy. The enotes introduction notes that "the comedy of Much Ado derives from the characters themselves and the manners of the...

Latest answer posted December 20, 2012 12:53 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

I'm not sure what you're talking about with "I'm doing my sats soon." SAT's?? Specific questions about specific pieces of literature are not on the SAT I.However, to answer your...

Latest answer posted April 17, 2008 7:45 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Shakespeare's language is English, but an English made strange to us by three things: the time that has passed since he lived, the fact that he wrote in verse, and the specific vocabulary...

Latest answer posted March 17, 2007 10:43 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Claudio and Leonato turn against Hero, even with little proof that she has done something wrong. Hero’s fiance and father both turned against her, and no one but Beatrice came to her defense. At...

Latest answer posted June 4, 2016 11:32 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

This scene is absolutely crucial to the overall plot and the rising action of the play. Note how when Don Pedro says he will leave after the marriage, Claudio is quick to offer to accompany him,...

Latest answer posted January 18, 2011 6:40 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

In Act I, scene i of Much Ado About Nothing, Leonato, governor of Messina, speaks to a messenger: I find here that Don Peter hathbestowed much honour on a young Florentine called Claudio....

Latest answer posted September 15, 2010 11:37 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Two reasons for opening Much Ado about Nothing with the background of war have to do with social situation and character development. In the first, choosing a setting that includes the background...

Latest answer posted July 15, 2010 12:00 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

As denoted by Shakespeare, Don John is labeled as the "bastard" brother of Don Pedro. While Shakespeare does not explore the family backrgound between Don Pedro and Don John, we know that they were...

Latest answer posted April 2, 2012 9:18 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

The simple answer to your question is that the play operates on several levels at once. There is the romantic comedy which appeals to the heart, and not to the head: the heart-warming stories of...

Latest answer posted November 14, 2008 1:20 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

In Act 1 of Much Ado About Nothing, Shakespeare begins setting up the two central conflicts. The first conflict is between Prince Don Pedro and his illegitimate brother Don John. As an illegitimate...

Latest answer posted July 5, 2016 9:33 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Much Ado's main focal point and plot device is the readiness of the characters to accept error and misinformation. This is a common method of comedy in Shakespeare's plays. Don John's false...

Latest answer posted January 9, 2008 10:52 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

We don't know for certain what Shakespeare did and didn't read - it's a game based on finding similarities between the source and his play and drawing conclusions appropriately. Academics *think*...

Latest answer posted November 8, 2008 11:06 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Don Pedro is a character in Much Ado About Nothing, one of William Shakespeare's many popular plays. Pedro was a member of the Aragonian nobility, and he is often referred to as "Prince" in the...

Latest answer posted February 7, 2016 2:50 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Leonato from Much Ado about Nothing and Joseph Strorm from The Chrysalids are in most regards complete opposites of each other. Leonato, a governor and well-versed in diplomacy and courtesy to...

Latest answer posted July 15, 2010 12:47 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

I often wonder about the same thing in the case of Portia with Bassanio in The Merchant of Venice. He seems pretty callous to me, obviously wanting Portia because of her money and offering little...

Latest answer posted January 29, 2011 4:26 pm UTC

5 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

I do not believe that Leonato ever beat Hero in this play. The only time in the play that he shows any anger toward her is in Act IV, Scene 1. In that scene, Claudio has just refused to marry...

Latest answer posted January 7, 2010 6:31 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Claudio is virtous while Borachio is villanous. For example, in 2.1. 301-303, Claudio shows his gallantry when he says, "...Lady as / you are mine, I am yours. I give away myself for you / and...

Latest answer posted May 11, 2007 7:00 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

I notice that you had associated your question with Ted Hughes' Shakespeare and the Goddess of Complete Being. However, you'll need to make this link more specifically obvious in your question,...

Latest answer posted January 17, 2011 5:03 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Much Ado About Nothing is the comedic version of Romeo and Juliet, except with two sets of lovers (Hero and Claudio; Beatrice and Benedick). Both plays have a Prince (Escalus and Pedro). Both...

Latest answer posted November 10, 2009 10:32 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

No. The comic element is superior to the heroic element in Much Ado. While there is some ethical action (defending Hero's reputation), and some desire to thwart the wicked (namely Don John), what...

Latest answer posted February 12, 2007 10:18 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Well, the short-term effects are quite easy to identify. Both Beatrice and Benedick are made to believe that the other is in love with them. Thus we can see that Don Pedro was successful in his...

Latest answer posted February 10, 2011 7:03 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Shakespeare uses many Elizabethan phrases and colloquialisms in his plays that were quite common in his day but have fallen out of use in modern times. One of these is the exclamation "Go to!" It's...

Latest answer posted June 10, 2013 9:59 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

As you can probably imagine, this answer will lack precision, because we do not know for sure what high school teachers typically ask. Moreover, I am sure that there will be quite a bit of...

Latest answer posted January 2, 2012 10:52 am UTC

1 educator answer

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