Much Ado About Nothing Questions and Answers

Much Ado About Nothing

Much Ado About Nothing is one of Shakespeare's most popular comedies. Set in Italy, it focuses on two coupes, Hero and Claudio and Beatrice and Benedick. The former couple are sweet innocents,...

Latest answer posted February 4, 2019 4:28 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

Borachio and Conrade work with Don John to slander Hero and spoil Don Pedro’s festivities, so they are not trustworthy characters. However, they might not be quite as malevolent as Don John....

Latest answer posted April 21, 2016 8:29 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Don John, Borachio, and Conrade reverse the merrymaking at the beginning of Much Ado About Nothing. Don John asserts that he is “a plain-dealing villain” who wants to hurt his half-brother Don...

Latest answer posted April 8, 2016 4:21 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

There is a suggestion in the text that these “two bears” were once in love with each other (2.1.280-82). Shakespeare does not say why the relationship broke down, but each other is obsessed with...

Latest answer posted October 5, 2007 9:21 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

The theme of appearance vs. reality is used all throughout the play and there are many instances in which something appears to be real but in actuality is something completely different. Listed...

Latest answer posted July 7, 2012 5:22 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

In many of Shakespeare's plays, the themes of miscommunication or delayed information play prominent roles. In this comedy in particular, the harmful role of gossip compounds the more general...

Latest answer posted October 18, 2018 2:04 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

When the play begins, Benedick and Beatrice are already in love, but both of them are too proud to admit that they love one another. Benedick hides his feelings by pretending to be a ladies' man...

Latest answer posted February 14, 2018 4:35 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Don John is the half brother of the prince, Don Pedro. He is the bastard brother since his parents, unlike Don Pedro's, weren't married. He is angry and bitter and he is jealous because he is...

Latest answer posted October 27, 2009 8:09 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

The enotes study guide contains a brief discussion of each character here:http://www.enotes.com/muchado/36453 Then, if you click the section marked "Character Analysis," you will see a detailed...

Latest answer posted March 27, 2007 2:08 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Act IV Scene 1 is the climax of the play, when the revenge against Claudio executed by Don John and his henchmen in the previous act takes its toll. Hero, unfortunately for her, is nothing more...

Latest answer posted May 14, 2012 2:54 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Excellent question! I love how this combines two characters that many people would not equate with the other; thinking about the advice that the older, wiser character of Beatrice would give to a...

Latest answer posted May 31, 2018 1:17 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

The savage bull may; but if ever the sensibleBenedick bear it, pluck off the bull's horns and setthem in my forehead: and let me be vilely painted,and in such great letters as they write "Here...

Latest answer posted September 13, 2019 11:42 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

I personally think it took a great deal of honor for Benedick to stay behind at the wedding with Beatrice and Hero, rather than leaving with Don Pedro and Claudio. It would have been the...

Latest answer posted December 16, 2007 4:16 am UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

A research question for a piece of literature must be a question that you have to research to find the answer to; in other words, not a question that requires personal reflection, evaluation, or...

Latest answer posted April 10, 2016 1:12 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

If Beatrice were writing an obituary to fake Hero's death, she could use the standard technique and format. To write an obituary, you want the first line to state the deceased's name, age,...

Latest answer posted June 29, 2012 3:02 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Do you mean the various notes that the characters use or the way people note (or notice) each other. I'm assuming the latter. Claudio brings up noting (noticing) Hero very quickly upon returning...

Latest answer posted March 10, 2008 1:18 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Beatrice is extremely quick-witted and verbally adept, frequently amusing her relatives and friends with elaborate stories and jokes, often at their own expense. Though she is generous and...

Latest answer posted November 16, 2008 6:01 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

I'm not sure that Hero really changes very much from the beginning to the end of the play. She remains very trusting of Claudio, despite the fact that he publicly shamed her and refused to marry...

Latest answer posted January 30, 2008 12:50 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

Beatrice and Benedick are attracted to one another, but have a difficult time expressing that attraction. They are intellectual equals who enjoy matching wits. Shakespeare was the first playwrite...

Latest answer posted September 26, 2007 11:46 am UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

I would want to argue that you can't just look at Beatrice alone to explore the theme of love through her character. Let us remember that Shakespeare presents us with two couples, and interestingly...

Latest answer posted June 9, 2011 8:09 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Benedick does not hold absolute power over Beatrice. While they are confessing their love, he tells her to ask him to do anything for her, as proof of his love. Beatrice replies , "Kill...

Latest answer posted October 21, 2007 1:43 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

This scene in Leonato's garden seems to be a throwaway in that it contains mostly banter between Benedick and Margaret. However, in a play so filled with wit and wordplay, this continues the...

Latest answer posted January 12, 2020 9:00 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Well, it's a subtle one. While they're dancing you get most of the conversation, Beatrice describing how, when Benedick isn't encouraged when he's trying to be funny, he goes all melancholy: Do,...

Latest answer posted February 20, 2009 3:17 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Shakespeare scholars agree that sources for the Hero-Claudio story in Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing include Ludovico Ariosto's epic poem, Orlando Furioso, published in English in 1591, and...

Latest answer posted February 17, 2020 3:53 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Much Ado About Nothing is assumed to have been written around 1598. The story is set around that time in the 16th century, in the port city of Messina. It is important to note that the soldiers...

Latest answer posted June 3, 2010 4:19 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

In Ariosto's Orlando Furioso, there is an episode in which Polinesso seeks vengeance upon a princess named Ginevra by tarnishing her reputation. He has her attendant dress in the princess's clothes...

Latest answer posted February 17, 2020 12:53 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Each character in the couples gives us a different perspective concerning the theme of love. For example, the characterizations of Beatrice and Benedick both relay the theme concerning love that...

Latest answer posted July 13, 2012 6:44 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Deception is an integral component of this play as are many of Shakespeare's comedies. Some of the deceptions that occur in the play are: Don Pedro says he will woo Hero for Claudio in Act 1,...

Latest answer posted October 19, 2009 8:08 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

In William Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing, calling women sexist names in public may be "nothing" for men, but it is a major problem for women. Like most men of the day, Claudio and Don Pedro...

Latest answer posted March 11, 2010 9:09 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

Shakespeare’s sources Shakespeare used a handful of sources for Much Ado About Nothing. Lodovico Ariosto, translated by Sir John Harington, Orlando Furioso (1591). Canto 5 of the poem provided...

Latest answer posted May 29, 2007 8:39 am UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

These four categories of romantic comedy have been described by author Michael Hague on his website. "secrets and lies" is when the main character is trying to deceive others, usually including...

Latest answer posted May 15, 2020 12:09 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

The gender roles play an important part of the theme of much ado about nothing. At the very start of the play we hear, ""You must not, sir, mistake my niece. There is a kind of merry war betwixt...

Latest answer posted March 22, 2007 12:00 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Beatrice's characterization in Much Ado's Act IV scene i is quite conflicted. Her cousin Hero is about to marry Claudio when instead of marrying her, Claudio accuses Hero of sleeping with another...

Latest answer posted March 2, 2016 7:51 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Excellent questions! Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing is a unique play, and his intriguing depictions of affection between all of the characters give us much to think about. First of all, let's...

Latest answer posted May 7, 2018 9:38 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Love cannot be poured into stereotypical molds. The society of the day, in the play, and the society of Don Pedro and his men showed men to be superior to women and in control of women while women...

Latest answer posted November 2, 2009 8:14 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

The title of this play, in Shakespeare's time, would have been pronounced Much ado about Noting. This idea of Noting is a central theme of the play. People "note" or listen to everything that...

Latest answer posted June 5, 2007 11:18 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

It would appear that both of these characters are in love. Even before we meet Benedick, Beatrice is asking about him and we are told by Leonato that they have "a merry war" of wit between them....

Latest answer posted October 23, 2010 5:35 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

One interesting way to approach answering this question would be to consider the response of both Beatrice and Benedick to hearing the elaborate deception of their friends in stating that the other...

Latest answer posted February 14, 2011 2:34 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

In order to determine the answer to this question you must first understand the concepts of the Shakespearean Clown and Fool. Both misuse language and comment on important issues of the day or...

Latest answer posted April 22, 2012 8:01 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

In Act I, Scene 1 of Much Ado About Nothing, the scene is set in front of Leonato's house and a messenger is telling Leonato, Beatrice and Hero that guests are coming. Soon the guests, Don Pedro,...

Latest answer posted August 5, 2010 7:04 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

The 1993 and 2012 film adaptations of William Shakespeare's play, Much Ado About Nothing, feature the same group of main characters. First, there are Benedick and Beatrice, who are both very full...

Latest answer posted October 28, 2016 6:05 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

There is a certain segment of the population who just love malapropisms. It's funny, and even when it's not funny, sometimes packing a whole lot of them in a row, like in parts of Much Ado About...

Latest answer posted March 14, 2008 10:21 am UTC

3 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

These lines serve primarily as further exposition regarding Claudio's love for Hero and raises a question as to whom Claudio wishes to disclose his feelings. This question also raises an issue...

Latest answer posted January 12, 2020 9:44 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Yes, there's a whole bucket of references and themes to the idea that appearance can be different to reality. In just the way that a mask makes the person seem not like the person, so too do all...

Latest answer posted February 19, 2009 8:53 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Benedick is the perceptive character who immediately suspects Don John as the culprit in the plot. The exact lines are as follows: *FRIAR FRANCIS There is some strange misprision in the princes....

Latest answer posted May 23, 2007 11:14 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Kenneth Branagh's film version of the play follows the script very well, so look to the play for inspiration for your title when you review Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing. Your title will...

Latest answer posted November 25, 2013 4:33 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

The famous gulling scenes, in Act II scene 3 and Act III scene 1 when Benedick and then Beatrice are tricked into believing that the other is in love with them, are key moments in the play and also...

Latest answer posted February 17, 2011 6:51 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Don Pedro is most noted for his regal graciousness. He is titled Prince of Arragon and his demeanor is befitting that of a prince in his interactions with his subordinates and with his host and his...

Latest answer posted August 5, 2010 7:53 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Hero is definitely the character who best exemplifies a Christian spouse. Hero is modest and loving while Beatrice is known for her antagonism and pride. Hero is very forgiving while Beatrice...

Latest answer posted July 8, 2012 12:00 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

When conducting a critical analysis of a character, we first want to identify the author's main purpose in using the character. Does the author mean to teach the reader/viewer something new,...

Latest answer posted July 14, 2012 5:57 am UTC

1 educator answer

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