Much Ado About Nothing Questions and Answers

Much Ado About Nothing

Jealousy can be best exemplified in the characters of Claudio and Don John. Don John is jealous of the attention and favor granted to Claudio by Don Pedro, the prince, which leads to Don John's...

Latest answer posted November 8, 2007 12:07 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Leonato says he is an honorable soldier: "I find here that Don Peter hath bestowed much honour on a young Florentine called Claudio." The messenger calls him noble: "He is most in the company of...

Latest answer posted November 30, 2009 1:14 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

In William Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing, we find a handful of characters who become entangled in the complexities of romantic love. Beatrice and Benedick are two sides of the same coin--...

Latest answer posted June 16, 2016 11:26 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Don John appears in one scene in Act III -- scene ii. It is important to note that, earlier in the play, Don John tells the audience that he plans to bring down his half brother Don Pedro's...

Latest answer posted January 29, 2011 8:55 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

I would echo the sentiments of the previous Educator and also say that no, Claudio does not deserve Hero. For one thing, he's way too immature. Just look at how he's so easily manipulated by the...

Latest answer posted January 6, 2019 1:22 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

When the play begins, Benedick and Beatrice are already in love, but both of them are too proud to admit that they love one another. Benedick hides his feelings by pretending to be a ladies' man...

Latest answer posted February 14, 2018 4:35 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Leonato is the governor of Messina, where this excellent comedy is set, and is the father of Hero. He is involved in the gulling of Benedick and Beatrice and shows great wit and humour in his...

Latest answer posted February 28, 2011 3:52 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Much Ado About Nothing is full of duality, foils, doubles, and two-face deceivers. In Act II, scene i there is a masquerade ball. Don Pedro pretends to be Claudio and woo Hero for him. Beatrice...

Latest answer posted May 22, 2010 11:00 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

In act 1, scene 3, of William Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing, Don John is expressing his discontent with his situation in life to Conrade, one of his disreputable followers. DON JOHN. I...

Latest answer posted December 4, 2019 3:23 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

I think you are referring to the conversation between Hero and Ursula in act 3, scene 1, of the play, when the two women discuss Benedick's feelings for Beatrice in Leonato's garden. Hero declares...

Latest answer posted June 6, 2018 10:38 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

I guess one thing you need to think through carefully is what theme attracts you most - you must always pick a topic that you are enthusiastic about or that you are interested in, otherwise you...

Latest answer posted June 15, 2010 6:18 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

These two couples are very different. It would seem that the relationship between Hero and Claudio is immature. They are attracted to each other physically but they really don't know each other,...

Latest answer posted November 27, 2010 8:34 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

The play is entertaining because it is a comedy about love with an element of drama. Most of the entertainment value from the play comes from the squabbles of the lovers Benedick and Beatrice....

Latest answer posted May 28, 2016 8:40 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

In William Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing, calling women sexist names in public may be "nothing" for men, but it is a major problem for women. Like most men of the day, Claudio and Don Pedro...

Latest answer posted March 11, 2010 9:09 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

The most appropriate way to answer this question would be to take a particular staging of the play and consider how that production's staging affects the plot. However, it is possible to consider...

Latest answer posted September 28, 2010 8:22 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

In Much Ado about Nothing, William Shakespeare creates two love stories that each develops on its own terms but also intersects with that of the other couple. The play's happy ending shows a...

Latest answer posted April 19, 2020 8:32 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Leonato feels such despair as a result of Claudio and Don John's accusations that he actually wishes his daughter would die rather than regain consciousness. When she is unconscious still, he bids...

Latest answer posted April 5, 2019 2:35 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

Don Pedro, the Prince of Arragon, and Leonato, Governor of Messina, plot to make Beatrice and Benedick fall in love. Don Pedro tells his friend Benedick, “I shall see thee, ere I die, look pale...

Latest answer posted September 15, 2016 9:08 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Branagh is a Romantic, a director who amps up the volume in all of his movies. Shortly after making this one, he made Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, perhaps the quintessential Romantic novel of...

Latest answer posted November 6, 2009 10:10 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

Don John's fellow conspirators deserve part of the blame. Borachio, Conrade, and Margaret all participated in the false accusation; they all deserve part of the blame.In addition to the actual...

Latest answer posted December 10, 2008 10:25 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

It is interesting that this play is supposedly a comedy, when in fact, as with so many of Shakespeare's "comedies," there lies within it a very dark and disturbing message that seems to detract...

Latest answer posted October 6, 2013 5:01 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

The theme of appearance vs. reality is used all throughout the play and there are many instances in which something appears to be real but in actuality is something completely different. Listed...

Latest answer posted July 7, 2012 5:22 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

The Italian War of 1551-1559 is the likely backdrop for the plot of Much Ado About Nothing. The setting is Messina, which is located on the Island of Sicily and was part of the territory fought...

Latest answer posted April 10, 2020 12:22 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

The themes of reality and appearance, love, deception, and honor clash in these few lines. Act 4, scene 1 of Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing is set in a church, on the occasion of the marriage...

Latest answer posted January 13, 2020 2:00 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Don John is the half brother of the prince, Don Pedro. He is the bastard brother since his parents, unlike Don Pedro's, weren't married. He is angry and bitter and he is jealous because he is...

Latest answer posted October 27, 2009 8:09 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Well, it's a subtle one. While they're dancing you get most of the conversation, Beatrice describing how, when Benedick isn't encouraged when he's trying to be funny, he goes all melancholy: Do,...

Latest answer posted February 20, 2009 3:17 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

In order to examine how deception in Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing implicates (i.e., implies, infers) deception in Renaissance England, we'll draw some guidance from Ann Wroe's 2004 book,...

Latest answer posted April 23, 2012 12:27 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

For the most part, the 1993 film directed by Kenneth Branagh very accurately portrays the Shakespeare play. However, there are some differences in terms of lines delivered and characterization.Many...

Latest answer posted July 24, 2012 4:03 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

When Don John first tells Claudio and the Prince that Hero is disloyal and unchaste, Claudio declares that if he sees anything that ought to prevent his marrying Hero, he will "shame her" in front...

Latest answer posted April 12, 2020 8:46 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Love in Much Ado About Nothing is both precarious and enduring. On the one hand, significant events upset the romantic relationships. The lovers almost do not end up together. On the other hand,...

Latest answer posted April 26, 2016 12:53 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Excellent question! Act 1, scene 1, of Much Ado About Nothing has a lot character development and plays a large role in setting up several of the play's major themes, which are revisited...

Latest answer posted August 16, 2019 2:05 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

It's a key scene, I think, because it's the point at which the play seems to violently shift from comedy toward tragedy. It even opens with the sense that everything's already been wrapped up:...

Latest answer posted February 10, 2009 2:04 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Audiences in Shakespeare's time came to see his plays for pure entertainment. Drama, satire, and plot twists make for a witty production. Although Beatrice and Benedick appear to have a...

Latest answer posted March 29, 2008 11:01 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Love cannot be poured into stereotypical molds. The society of the day, in the play, and the society of Don Pedro and his men showed men to be superior to women and in control of women while women...

Latest answer posted November 2, 2009 8:14 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Claudio makes an important decision in Act III. He decides that there is concrete proof of Hero's infidelity. He does this based upon events that happen offstage and only reported to the audience...

Latest answer posted August 21, 2010 8:14 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

There is a certain segment of the population who just love malapropisms. It's funny, and even when it's not funny, sometimes packing a whole lot of them in a row, like in parts of Much Ado About...

Latest answer posted March 14, 2008 10:21 am UTC

3 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

Benedick is the perceptive character who immediately suspects Don John as the culprit in the plot. The exact lines are as follows: *FRIAR FRANCIS There is some strange misprision in the princes....

Latest answer posted May 23, 2007 11:14 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

In the world of Much Ado About Nothing there are clear lines that are drawn between the world of women and the world of men. In Messinian society, the sphere of man is based on military camaraderie...

Latest answer posted March 21, 2009 9:40 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

I'm assuming this question is asking how characters are able to utilize their honest voices in Much Ado About Nothing. Some of the ways include soliloquies, such as Benedick's and Beatrice's...

Latest answer posted November 4, 2010 6:16 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

In Much Ado About Nothing, Shakespeare seems to entwine his theme concerning love with his theme of appearance vs. reality, showing us the one perspective on love found in the play--that love is...

Latest answer posted July 9, 2012 10:19 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

In Much Ado About Nothing, on the morning of Hero's intended wedding to Claudio, Leonato is finishing his preparations and just about to leave when he is accosted by Dogberry and Verges who attempt...

Latest answer posted August 5, 2010 5:04 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Act IV scene 1 begins in front of the altar in the church. However, instead of the wedding that everyone expects, Claudio denounces Hero as a "loose woman." Leonato is furious, supposing that...

Latest answer posted January 26, 2011 4:36 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

There are many things that characterize a Shakespearean tragedy. However, while we can recognize some of these characteristics in Act 4, Scene 1 of Much Ado About Nothing, because the scene ends in...

Latest answer posted July 19, 2012 7:46 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

In order to determine the answer to this question you must first understand the concepts of the Shakespearean Clown and Fool. Both misuse language and comment on important issues of the day or...

Latest answer posted April 22, 2012 8:01 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

The play is all about wit, and Benedick enjoys proving just how witty he is as does Margaret in this scene. And so, this is “normal” conversation for Benedick with a woman, yet he is flirting with...

Latest answer posted August 15, 2007 2:05 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

In act 1, scene 1 of Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare, lines 230–249 contribute to the overall development of themes in the literary work as a whole, which deals with love, betrayal,...

Latest answer posted January 12, 2020 9:22 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

These lines relate to the themes of love and honor, or, more accurately, to love and honor deferred. In act 4, scene 1, Benedick confesses his love for Beatrice, and she confesses her love for him....

Latest answer posted January 12, 2020 11:23 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Much Ado About Nothing is one of Shakespeare's most popular comedies. Set in Italy, it focuses on two coupes, Hero and Claudio and Beatrice and Benedick. The former couple are sweet innocents,...

Latest answer posted February 4, 2019 4:28 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

Leonato is speaking to his niece Beatrice in act II, scene 1. The scene begins with Beatrice commenting on Count John’s tart looks, noting that a mixture of the taciturn John and the talkative...

Latest answer posted March 7, 2016 3:09 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Do you mean the various notes that the characters use or the way people note (or notice) each other. I'm assuming the latter. Claudio brings up noting (noticing) Hero very quickly upon returning...

Latest answer posted March 10, 2008 1:18 am UTC

1 educator answer

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