Much Ado About Nothing Questions and Answers

Much Ado About Nothing

The women of the play, meaning Hero and Beatrice, teach the men to love by showing them their faults, faults that prohibit real love from thriving.Through Hero, Claudio learns that he is gullible...

Latest answer posted July 15, 2012 4:58 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Don John's importance in this comedy lies in the way that he is the source of many of the play's confusions that threaten to make this comedy into a tragedy. It is he who, even before the play has...

Latest answer posted June 20, 2012 7:53 am UTC

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Much Ado About Nothing

The word "nothing" and the word "noting" were pronounced alike in Shakespeare's day. "Noting" or "observing" has a great deal to do with the play since much of the play is about appearances. In...

Latest answer posted May 20, 2009 8:15 pm UTC

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Much Ado About Nothing

The relationship between Beatrice and Benedick is antagonistic at best and volatile at worst, at least at the beginning and throughout the majority of the text. At the masquerade, Beatrice pretends...

Latest answer posted April 17, 2020 7:24 pm UTC

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Much Ado About Nothing

We can gain a better understanding of Claudio's thoughts and feelings the moment Hero unveils herself in the final scene by first looking at what we know of his thoughts and feelings prior to this...

Latest answer posted July 21, 2012 6:43 am UTC

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Much Ado About Nothing

In the very first scene of Much Ado About Nothing, Beatrice asks about Benedick, making fun of him to a messenger: MESSENGER: I see, lady, the gentleman is not in your books. BEATRICE: No; an he...

Latest answer posted March 15, 2016 10:50 pm UTC

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Much Ado About Nothing

Yes, I think Hero is something of an archetype. It's one of those parts that, every time I go and see the play, I really hope the actress playing her is going to blow me away and make me realise...

Latest answer posted January 5, 2009 4:03 am UTC

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Much Ado About Nothing

Much Ado About Nothing is one of Shakespeare's most popular plays, and like many of his comedies, it is often considered from a feminist perspective. Its two main female characters, Beatrice and...

Latest answer posted January 6, 2021 7:26 pm UTC

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Much Ado About Nothing

In Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing, Don John is the jealous brother of Don Pedro. Both are soldiers, but Don Pedro reaps the recognition for being the captain of a successful corps of men. Not...

Latest answer posted November 25, 2013 5:13 pm UTC

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Much Ado About Nothing

In classic Elizabethan style, Don Pedro, who is more experienced in life, tells his young soldier Claudio that he will court (or woo) Hero for him: "And I will fit thee with the remedy.I know we...

Latest answer posted November 18, 2013 7:51 pm UTC

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Much Ado About Nothing

Beatrice does not defend Hero because she is a woman, so she asks Benedick to do it. Beatrice does defend her cousin, but not in the way you are thinking. She does not jump up and shout during the...

Latest answer posted March 19, 2016 5:56 am UTC

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Much Ado About Nothing

Actually, noting is incredibly important, especially since apparently in Shakespeare's time, the "nothing" of the title would have been pronounced as "noting." This helps highlights the way in...

Latest answer posted May 29, 2011 7:00 pm UTC

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Much Ado About Nothing

This is Antonio (Leonato's older brother) from Act V, scene i, line 91. It comes upon the entrance of Claudio and Don Pedro after they have both caused Hero's "death" by defaming her at her own...

Latest answer posted October 10, 2010 11:00 pm UTC

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Much Ado About Nothing

Shakespeare was very good at combining opposing elements in his plays. Often his tragedies contained flashes of humor to lighten up the more serious scenes, just as his comedies dealt with serious...

Latest answer posted August 18, 2012 2:53 am UTC

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Much Ado About Nothing

BEATRICE: Good Lord, for alliance! Thus goes every one to the world but I, and I am sunburnt. I may sit in a corner and cry ‘Heigh-ho for a husband!’ DON PEDRO: Lady Beatrice, I will get you one....

Latest answer posted March 27, 2009 1:45 pm UTC

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Much Ado About Nothing

Although initially these two characters seem similar in terms of their shyness and their youth, it is clear that as the play progresses we question Claudio's character more and more. Hero appears...

Latest answer posted April 28, 2011 7:44 pm UTC

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Much Ado About Nothing

King Henry V repeats certain ideas and words throughout the speech. The most obvious repetition is "Crispian," repeated 7 times, which emphasizes its importance on his final rousing line, when he...

Latest answer posted October 14, 2015 2:51 pm UTC

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Much Ado About Nothing

Leonato, who is the father of Hero and uncle of Beatrice, is the governor of Messina, the setting of the play. Don Pedro, the Prince of Aragon, comes to visit and is welcomed by Leonato. Don...

Latest answer posted September 24, 2009 8:38 pm UTC

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Much Ado About Nothing

These two couples are very different. It would seem that the relationship between Hero and Claudio is immature. They are attracted to each other physically but they really don't know each other,...

Latest answer posted November 27, 2010 8:34 am UTC

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Much Ado About Nothing

Love in Much Ado About Nothing is both precarious and enduring. On the one hand, significant events upset the romantic relationships. The lovers almost do not end up together. On the other hand,...

Latest answer posted April 26, 2016 12:53 am UTC

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Much Ado About Nothing

When Beatrice first hears that Benedick, along with Don Pedro and the other soldiers, are coming to Messina, Beatrice immediately begins to mock Benedick. She says he's a "...valiant trencherman;...

Latest answer posted April 13, 2011 8:11 pm UTC

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Much Ado About Nothing

One of the most common themes in Shakespeare's plays is the political strife between a rightful ruler and those who challenge that rule. We see it most clearly in Macbeth, Richard II, and several...

Latest answer posted September 25, 2018 6:22 pm UTC

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Much Ado About Nothing

The biggest theme from this crucial scene in this play, that is supposedly denoted a comedy, is the way in which dishonour in a woman is regarded and treated. The thing that we should all focus on...

Latest answer posted February 8, 2012 2:00 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

That is an excellent question! I've read this play (Much Ado About Nothing) multiple times, directed it once, and watched the Branagh movie version of it too many times to count, and everytime I...

Latest answer posted September 27, 2008 5:49 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Because Shakespeare doesn't believe in sticking rigidly to "genre". This is the man who wrote a comedy about a Jew, just like Marlowe's "The Jew of Malta", but filled his Jewish character with...

Latest answer posted March 15, 2009 11:13 am UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

Many characters in literature possess both positive and negative character traits. Sometimes, a character can be defined as dynamic--if their character changes over the course of the piece. Other...

Latest answer posted May 30, 2012 9:08 pm UTC

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Much Ado About Nothing

Beatrice comments, at the beginning of Act II:"How tartly that gentleman looks. I never can see him but I am heartburned an hour after." (II, i)She is saying her stomach is upset when...

Latest answer posted December 18, 2007 6:04 am UTC

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Much Ado About Nothing

Act 4 of Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing begins with the blockbuster dramatic event of Claudio standing at the altar with Hero and refusing to marry her, calling her "an approved wanton"—a...

Latest answer posted February 15, 2020 2:19 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Leonato says he is an honorable soldier: "I find here that Don Peter hath bestowed much honour on a young Florentine called Claudio." The messenger calls him noble: "He is most in the company of...

Latest answer posted November 30, 2009 1:14 am UTC

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Much Ado About Nothing

In Much Ado About Nothing, the two the funniest and most developed characters in the play are Benedick and Beatrice. Their titanic passions, love/hate relationship, and gender biases regarding the...

Latest answer posted June 14, 2010 10:52 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

This is a large question, since what it seems that you are asking is, in effect, "How does producing the play for an audience help them understand it?" And the simple answer is that it cannot help...

Latest answer posted October 1, 2010 2:49 am UTC

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Much Ado About Nothing

Don John is the conniving and duplicitous villain of Shakespeare's comedy Much Ado About Nothing. He is Don Pedro's half-brother and a bastard, which, in the Shakespearean sense, means he was born...

Latest answer posted May 13, 2018 4:48 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

This is a difficult question to answer, since your question implies that you are asking about one director in particular, yet you don't make reference to any particular production. Each director...

Latest answer posted October 12, 2010 12:01 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

In William Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing, we find a handful of characters who become entangled in the complexities of romantic love. Beatrice and Benedick are two sides of the same coin--...

Latest answer posted June 16, 2016 11:26 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

There are many things that characterize a Shakespearean tragedy. However, while we can recognize some of these characteristics in Act 4, Scene 1 of Much Ado About Nothing, because the scene ends in...

Latest answer posted July 19, 2012 7:46 am UTC

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Much Ado About Nothing

The biggest contrast is in demeanor. Claudio is an emotional character, but Benedick is a rational one. Claudio is caught up by the idea of love, swept away by his attraction to Hero. He does...

Latest answer posted July 8, 2009 10:50 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Don John is the prince Don Pedro’s illegitimate half-brother. When the play begins, the brothers have only recently reconciled. Don John is a surly and quiet fellow. He describes himself as being...

Latest answer posted May 20, 2016 7:54 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

By the time we reach Act IV scene i of Much Ado About Nothing, we have already seen ample evidence that Leonato is a rather suggestible, weak-minded individual. When Claudio jilts his daughter at...

Latest answer posted November 8, 2019 6:44 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Don John is the illegitimate brother of Don Pedro. He is seen by other characters as sad and is criticized for not being talkative. His social status as “the Bastard” relegates him to the fringes...

Latest answer posted December 12, 2016 7:35 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

In the world of Much Ado About Nothing there are clear lines that are drawn between the world of women and the world of men. In Messinian society, the sphere of man is based on military camaraderie...

Latest answer posted March 21, 2009 9:40 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

While this is an interesting question, to address what the original audience reaction was to this play is almost impossible to answer. Very little is known of Shakespeare's plays at the time of...

Latest answer posted February 15, 2009 1:44 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Leonato feels such despair as a result of Claudio and Don John's accusations that he actually wishes his daughter would die rather than regain consciousness. When she is unconscious still, he bids...

Latest answer posted April 5, 2019 2:35 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

I think the main approach you can take would be to look at the role of irony and how it is played out in these two scenes. Of course, both of these scenes show the complete turn around of Beatrice...

Latest answer posted February 1, 2011 7:46 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

This relationship is central to the play. Their playful and often antagonistic behavior towards each other forms the basis of much of the play's comedy. But while they exchange insults and badmouth...

Latest answer posted March 25, 2011 6:41 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

The theme of love as portrayed through Beatrice particularly deals with the need for an absence of excessive pride in love. This theme is particularly portrayed through her actions and her...

Latest answer posted July 12, 2012 10:01 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

When Don John first tells Claudio and the Prince that Hero is disloyal and unchaste, Claudio declares that if he sees anything that ought to prevent his marrying Hero, he will "shame her" in front...

Latest answer posted April 12, 2020 8:46 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

In Much Ado about Nothing, William Shakespeare creates two love stories that each develops on its own terms but also intersects with that of the other couple. The play's happy ending shows a...

Latest answer posted April 19, 2020 8:32 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

It is speculated that when Shakespeare set Much Ado About Nothing in Messina, he was actually thinking of Venice, which was one of the most corrupt cities of his time period ("The Artificiality of...

Latest answer posted July 15, 2012 6:14 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

One of the enduring questions about Much Ado About Nothing is why Don John, the Prince's illegitimate brother, goes to such lengths to destroy Hero's reputation and therefore her marriage to...

Latest answer posted September 25, 2018 6:22 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

One example of suspension of disbelief can be seen in the moment at the masquerade in Act II, scene 1, when Don Pedro pretends to be Claudio in disguise to ask for Hero's hand in marriage on...

Latest answer posted February 26, 2015 7:09 am UTC

1 educator answer

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