Much Ado About Nothing Questions and Answers

Much Ado About Nothing

While Beatrice and Benedick fight with words throughout the entire play, they are seen as the classic "dueling lovers," or a romantic pairing that is exemplified with good-natured, if sometimes...

Latest answer posted January 8, 2012 1:34 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Part of your answer can be found in eNotes's discussion of themes for this play, found here. Disguise and with it deception are used in Much Ado for both good and bad ends. Shakespeare shows us...

Latest answer posted March 9, 2016 7:05 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

When confronted with the fact that both Beatrice and Benedick were led, via the "noting" of planned conversations among their friends, to believe that each was in love with the other,...

Latest answer posted January 8, 2008 10:54 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Interestingly, the title of Much Ado About Nothing plays into the theme of this comedy as the word nothing is often used by Shakespeare as a euphemism for the female sex organ; further, this word...

Latest answer posted January 7, 2014 7:30 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

I agree with bmadnick's answer, but would like to add my thoughts on the subject. When Margaret is discussing Hero's wedding attire, she says that Hero should wear a certain "rabato," or...

Latest answer posted October 12, 2007 2:23 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

Foils are characters that contrast with one another so that the author can highlight important details or traits of each person. In Much Ado About Nothing, Shakespeare implements many different...

Latest answer posted August 30, 2016 9:40 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Don John, Don Pedro's illegitimate brother, in Act 3 scene 2. It is a lie, and Don John seems to be motivated in part by jealousy of Claudio and of Don Pedro. He is of a melancholy disposition, as...

Latest answer posted May 25, 2007 11:22 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

As I understand it, the name means "drunkard." It sounds very much like the Spanish word for drunk "borracho," so I tend to believe this explanation. The word is also supposed to refer to a type...

Latest answer posted February 15, 2010 10:10 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

During the first half of the play, Benedick claims both that he despises women and that they are attracted to him. He is opposed to marriage in part because of his overall misogyny, which includes...

Latest answer posted August 19, 2020 2:59 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

The repetition of the symbol of food helps to further portray the theme of honor. Leonato has thrown Prince Don Pedro a feast fit for a king in order to honor him for his safe return home and his...

Latest answer posted June 29, 2012 7:23 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

You're right on the money. Benedick is convinced that any woman he married would cheat on him. This would make him a cuckold, and cuckolds were indeed depicted as having horns. (Incidentally, there...

Latest answer posted July 1, 2016 2:12 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

It's easy because Beatrice and Benedick have a history; they're also very similar in their personalities and behaviors. At the beginning of the play, Leonato says of Beatrice: There is akind of...

Latest answer posted February 11, 2019 7:03 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

One of the best examples of the limitations of gender roles occurs after Hero is denounced. Beatrice is despondent that she, as a woman, can not challenge Claudio for what he has done. She wants...

Latest answer posted December 17, 2007 6:41 am UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

Hero’s innocence is eventually uncovered by the very silly Constable Dogberry. Before there is any proof, Friar Francis and Hero’s cousin Beatrice are convinced that she is not guilty of being...

Latest answer posted March 7, 2016 6:25 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

In the opening scene when we first meet Beatrice and Benedick, we see that Beatrice uses a lot of rhetorical schemes to insult Benedick, while Benedick makes more use of figurative language. By the...

Latest answer posted July 5, 2012 1:36 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Act 1, scene 1 of William Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing introduces the reader to Don Pedro and his men. Leonato speaks with a messenger regarding a letter he has received from Don Pedro that...

Latest answer posted April 7, 2020 7:13 pm UTC

5 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

Claudio is a good deal less experienced in the ways of the world than Benedick. As such, he has none of the latter's world-weary cynicism when it comes to relations with the opposite sex. Claudio...

Latest answer posted July 21, 2018 6:36 am UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

Much Ado About Nothing juxtaposes the honorable with the dishonorable. It also juxtaposes honor with appearances and reality, showing us that the theme concerning honor questions whether or not...

Latest answer posted June 30, 2012 12:13 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

I am rather confused by your question. I have just re-read both of these scenes and can't find any reference anywhere to imaginary animals. Do you perhaps mean real animals and birds? If you look...

Latest answer posted February 11, 2011 6:40 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

In Much Ado About Nothing, Don John is a villain and a bastard. These archetypes confine him to playing a static role in the comedy. Most bastards are stock characters in literature: they are...

Latest answer posted June 13, 2010 9:23 am UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

In Act III, scene iv of Much Ado About Nothing, Hero and Maragaret have a conversation about clothes: MARGARET Troth, I think your other rabato were better. HERO No, pray thee, good Meg, I'll wear...

Latest answer posted August 23, 2011 2:13 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

After Beatrice and Benedick are tricked into falling in love with each other, their love faces an obstacle when Claudio publicly disgraces Hero. Beatrice wants to avenge her beloved cousin and...

Latest answer posted July 11, 2012 7:16 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Overall, the two pairs have similar paths, but different dynamics within them. For both, their relationship is tested, and these tests are due to other people interfering. For Beatrice and...

Latest answer posted February 28, 2020 1:56 am UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

In Much Ado About Nothing, Shakespeare shows that the duality between appearance versus reality is a matter of gender, social class, age, and status. In terms of gender, Beatrice appears to scorn...

Latest answer posted December 2, 2010 12:20 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

One of the most common themes in Shakespeare's plays is the political strife between a rightful ruler and those who challenge that rule. We see it most clearly in Macbeth, Richard II, and several...

Latest answer posted September 25, 2018 6:22 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

In Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing, Don Pedro, Prince of Aragon, has recently returned victorious from battle for the throne against his illegitimate half-brother, Don John. Although Don Pedro...

Latest answer posted February 25, 2020 9:34 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

In Shakespeare’s classic comedy Much Ado About Nothing, Dogberry is a clownish constable introduced in Act 3 who gives the neighborhood watch some very suspect advice on how to conduct themselves....

Latest answer posted December 12, 2019 3:14 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Hero and Claudio seem to have a simple love, especially in comparison to the complicated romance between Beatrice and Benedick. The two are archetypal lovers, young, bashful, and innocent. Claudio...

Latest answer posted March 23, 2016 4:23 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

I'm not sure which exchange you are referring to... The exchanges between Benedick and Beatrice in the first half of Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing are witty banter (verbal irony: sarcasm,...

Latest answer posted March 16, 2010 8:27 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

A major theme in Much Ado About Nothing is "appearance versus reality," and there is no better setting and occasion to develop this theme than a masquerade where everyone is masked. Everyone, it...

Latest answer posted April 28, 2010 9:49 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

This is all a matter of opinion obviously, but in general, the works of Shakespeare were meant to be acted out as plays in front of a live audience. The play is clearly the intent and it was...

Latest answer posted October 23, 2019 3:03 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

It's Act II Scene I in Much Ado About Nothing and Leonato and Beatrice are engaging in another round of witty bantering. During their verbal sparring Beatrice refers to the old proverb "God sends a...

Latest answer posted February 5, 2018 8:28 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Don Pedro and Claudio believe the accusations because the of the "proof" that has been presented. Believing that Margaret is Hero based on the view the "see", it is easy to accept Don John's word....

Latest answer posted June 4, 2007 2:18 am UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

In Much Ado About Nothing, Shakespeare shows how easily people in love can be manipulated. Claudio falls in love with Hero at first sight, which is not an unusual occurrence in many of...

Latest answer posted January 3, 2020 8:25 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

In Much Ado About Nothing, Shakespeare uses many allusions in Beatrice's language as one means to characterize Beatrice as an intelligent, socially rebellious wit.Allusions can be seen in her first...

Latest answer posted May 31, 2015 5:45 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Don John is the prince Don Pedro’s illegitimate brother. The two have only recently become reconciled, but Don John still deeply resents Don Pedro. He feels trapped: “I had rather be a canker in a...

Latest answer posted May 12, 2016 5:22 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

The relationships between the couples Hero and Claudio and Beatrice and Benedick are so different because Shakespeare is showing us two opposite poles of love. Hero's and Claudio's relationship...

Latest answer posted July 20, 2012 1:28 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

At the masquerade ball in act 2, scene 1, Beatrice and Benedict are both in disguise and pretend not to recognize each other, even though they both know who the other is. While pretending not to...

Latest answer posted April 7, 2020 5:48 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

I'm not sure if she melts into his hands, although she is clearly still willing to marry him despite the garbage he dumped on her. It seems to me like she is more concerned with making sure...

Latest answer posted August 20, 2008 4:00 pm UTC

6 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

Dogberry and Verges are the "clown" characters, specifically created to be absurd and foolish, in contrast to the other characters. Though this is a comedy, and pretty much every character has...

Latest answer posted March 19, 2019 12:26 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

Much Ado About Nothing is set in an aristocratic, hierarchical, and patriarchal society. So what do these words mean? An aristocratic society is one in which both the majority of the wealth (and...

Latest answer posted July 7, 2010 12:05 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Boratio appears to be overcome with an attack of conscience upon hearing of Hero's supposed death. Whether his guilt is truly remorse or merely an attempt to save his own life is up to the reader...

Latest answer posted January 8, 2008 6:53 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

The sexton plays a large role in Act 4, Scene 2 with relation to the prisoners. He especially acts as a guide in the interrogation because Dogberry does not have a clue as to what he is doing. The...

Latest answer posted June 29, 2012 5:23 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Much Ado About Nothing can be seen as an exploration of male insecurities. This is especially clear in the main plot, in which Don John finds it easy to manipulate both Claudio and Don Pedro into...

Latest answer posted September 16, 2020 3:16 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Wit is frequently portrayed through both irony and puns. We see Shakespeare use verbal, situational, and even dramatic irony to create wit in the play. Plus, in some instances, the types of irony...

Latest answer posted July 23, 2012 9:43 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

The dramatic significance is the purpose of any particular element in a play. Every single element of a play, such as a character, action, line, soliloquy, monologue, etc., is carefully constructed...

Latest answer posted July 23, 2012 11:50 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

The rejection of Hero happens as she and Claudio have come before the Friar (plus all the characters of the play and the audience) to be married in Act IV, scene i. The actual line of accusation...

Latest answer posted November 6, 2010 8:34 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

If you are referring to Antonio's advice to Leonato in Act 5, Scene 1, Antonio advises Leonato to be patient and to make sure that the ones who have offended him suffer too. Act 5, Scene 1 begins...

Latest answer posted June 23, 2016 5:34 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

I think that you are talking about what happens in Act IV, Scene 2 of the play. In that scene, Dogberry is basically accusing Borachio and Conrade of being liars. He calls them "false knaves." In...

Latest answer posted March 28, 2010 9:41 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

The phrase you are asking about is in Act I, scene 1 of Much Ado About Nothing. Leonato, the governor of Messina, reads in a letter that Don Pedro is coming to visit Messina that night. The...

Latest answer posted September 15, 2011 3:40 am UTC

1 educator answer

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