Much Ado About Nothing Questions and Answers

Much Ado About Nothing

The aftermath of war is significant in that it establishes the main characters, giving us an insight into their various personalities. Immediately, we can see that Don Pedro is a take charge guy...

Latest answer posted July 25, 2018 12:16 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

In literature, foils exist to emphasize the contrasts between two different characters. In Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing, Beatrice and Hero make interesting foils to one another thanks to...

Latest answer posted November 6, 2018 8:20 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

In Act 4, Scene 1, we see that both Benedick and Beatrice view love as an emotion that they both wanted to steer clear of, but also as a happy, relieving emotion. Beyond that, they also see love as...

Latest answer posted July 5, 2012 4:17 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

In Much Ado About Nothing, betrayal is at the heart of many of the problems of the play, but it also ends up being the key to its happy ending. Initially, an instance of betrayal sets up one of the...

Latest answer posted May 15, 2018 7:19 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Much Ado About Nothing is a comedy by William Shakespeare which was probably written written in 1598 and/or 1599. The first thing to note is that although the play was written in England, it is...

Latest answer posted May 29, 2018 12:44 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

I like the analysis of the quote that explains it as a message of the morality within human actions. The progression of language in the quote parallels the descent of human action. To "dare"...

Latest answer posted January 22, 2010 11:14 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

As Leonato in the first scene of this play, in reference to Beatrice's facetious queries as to how many men Benedick has killed and eaten, "there is a kind of merry war betwixt Signior Benedick"...

Latest answer posted April 21, 2018 10:12 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Borachio and Margaret have an affair in Much Ado About Nothing. Borachio purposely times having sex with Margaret in view of a window as a part of Don John's plan to trick Claudio and Don Pedro...

Latest answer posted October 8, 2017 1:16 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

In addition to the superb answer above: "Men were deceivers ever." The main villain in the play is a male, Don John the Bastard. He dupes males: Don Pedro and Claudio. The play's hero is not...

Latest answer posted May 30, 2010 10:00 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Communication is a central theme in this play, shown through the miscommunication between Hero and Claudio. Claudio is tricked by Don John into thinking Hero is unfaithful. Don John shows Claudio...

Latest answer posted February 28, 2020 5:12 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

Of course we can't be sure why Shakespeare chose the name Hero, since he did not leave analyses of his works behind for future scholars to reference. Maybe this is why we have more research and...

Latest answer posted January 2, 2011 7:44 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

It is obvious even before the men arrive, that Beatrice and Benedick have had a relationship before the men went off to war. Beatrice questions the messenger in a playful manner which may sound...

Latest answer posted September 12, 2010 9:56 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

Shakespeare's Much Ado about Nothing opens at the home of Leonato, the governor of Messina in Italy. Leonato, his daughter Hero, and his niece Beatrice are told by a messenger that Don Pedro and...

Latest answer posted July 8, 2013 6:03 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Many different themes can be found in the first act. In fact, the very first scene lays out most of the play's major themes. Listed below are a few:The theme of men being honorable is first...

Latest answer posted July 22, 2012 5:32 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Don John wants to hurt his brother’s reputation by causing a scandal, so he interferes with Claudio and Hero’s wedding. Don John does not like his brother. He is illegitimate, and he resents...

Latest answer posted April 27, 2016 4:47 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Modern audiences can relate to Much Ado About Nothing because the basic "will they or won't they" love story never gets old. At the beginning of the story, Beatrice and Benedick seem to hate each...

Latest answer posted September 18, 2018 5:53 am UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

As James Smith points out, Dogberry is significant to the plot because he actually represents the play's most central themes, that of excessive pride or arrogance and appearances vs. reality. The...

Latest answer posted July 9, 2012 5:50 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Beatrice promises to eat the soldiers that Benedick has killed. Her words are outrageous, of course. Her uncle, Leonato, is a little shocked by Beatrice's words. He tries to explain her words away...

Latest answer posted December 27, 2018 6:56 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

Claudio has been deceived into thinking that Hero has been unfaithful to him by standing at a window at night and speaking to Boracchio. Boracchio had been speaking to the waiting gentlewoman...

Latest answer posted January 29, 2009 9:06 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

One of the important themes in Much Ado About Nothing is the conflict between men and women, specifically, the struggle for equality between Beatrice and Benedick. Beatrice is very unusual as a...

Latest answer posted May 19, 2012 2:08 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Interesting question! It's important to note that when Hero was originally disgraced at the wedding, Leonato was ready to see her dead because of the shame she had supposedly brought upon her...

Latest answer posted January 10, 2008 12:18 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

In Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing, Don John, "the Bastard Prince," aims to make everyone miserable by throwing a wrench into the wedding between Hero and Claudio and humiliating his brother,...

Latest answer posted May 30, 2016 8:21 am UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

In all of Shakespeare's plays, there are only three true "fools": Feste in Twelfth Night, Touchstone in As You Like It, and the Fool in King Lear. These are characters who are employed by a...

Latest answer posted January 1, 2020 4:48 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

Part of what makes Dogberry such a humorous character is the irony Shakespeare employs in Dogberry's characterization. Dogberry is a poorly educated individual, as seen in his poor use of language,...

Latest answer posted July 5, 2012 12:14 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

This is a great question to think about, because Leonato seems to present two paradoxical impressions in terms of his relationship with his one and only child, Hero. In the infamous marriage scene...

Latest answer posted August 16, 2011 8:34 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Antonio is Leonato's older brother and, consequently, Hero's uncle. Antonio prioritizes his family over just about all else—unlike Don Pedro's brother, Don John, whom Don Pedro has just bested in...

Latest answer posted April 25, 2019 6:16 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

The play certainly has moral value. Aside from being funny, the conflict with Hero, Claudio, and Don John is a lesson in trust, jealousy, and communication. Like many villains of Shakespeare's...

Latest answer posted February 15, 2016 6:46 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

This is a very intelligent question. Normally the distinction between verse and prose has to do with the nature of what happens in that particular scene and the kind of characters involved. On the...

Latest answer posted February 17, 2011 6:57 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Deception affects all of the major characters in Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing, who are, at one time or another, a deceiver, one who is deceived, or both. Beatrice and Benedick appear to be...

Latest answer posted July 27, 2020 7:49 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Shakespeare re-examined certain themes over and over, in both his tragedies and comedies. One of the predominant themes is appearance versus reality, and another common theme is jealousy. All of...

Latest answer posted November 3, 2010 10:11 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Shakespeare is trying to show in Much Ado About Nothing that appearances—and words—are deceiving. It takes time and an ability to persevere to get to the bottom of who a person is, as people are...

Latest answer posted May 21, 2019 5:29 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

Hero is quite the contrast to her cousin Beatrice. Hero is modest, sweet, and forgiving. She is never sharp-tongued like Beatrice and has fewer lines than the other lead characters. In fact, Hero...

Latest answer posted February 12, 2019 7:17 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

The point of view, or narrative mode, Shakespeare uses in his plays, like most plays, is the third person objective view point. We know that plays are narrated in third person because we do not see...

Latest answer posted July 4, 2012 9:45 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

In act II, scene i of Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing, immediately after Don Pedro has just succeeded in wooing Hero for Claudio and failed at winning Beatrice for himself, Don Pedro proposes...

Latest answer posted May 12, 2015 6:12 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

The title Much Ado About Nothing is very apt, or appropriate, for the play because there is actually a pun found in the title and once this pun is understood, the pieces and themes of the play fall...

Latest answer posted July 14, 2012 12:49 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

In Much Ado About Nothing, Don John is a stock, flat, static character. He is a villain because he admits it to Conrad, another villain: I had rather be a canker in a hedge than a rose inhis...

Latest answer posted May 22, 2010 6:19 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Benedick is expressing astonishment that a man like Claudio, who's always laughed at men making fools of themselves over love, has became just like them. Benedick resolves that he will never end up...

Latest answer posted March 7, 2019 9:29 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Women during Shakespeare's time were supposed to do what women have done throughout history: stay home, clean the house, have babies, and obey their husbands. In this comedy, however, Beatrice is...

Latest answer posted May 1, 2013 6:12 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

The opening scene of this famous comedy, as is evident from its very first few lines, is characterised by relief, joy and jubilation. This is because Don Pedro, the Prince of Aragon, has just been...

Latest answer posted December 8, 2012 7:41 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

References to music are found all throughout the play. Music and dancing aid in courtship and, thus, also symbolize courtship. Paul N. Siegel points out that the entire structure of the play is...

Latest answer posted June 30, 2012 5:48 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

The answer to both of your questions is that it's up to how you interpret. Hero doesn't give us a clear reason for why she forgives Claudio: in fact, the whole forgiveness thing is slightly vague...

Latest answer posted March 26, 2009 11:11 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

These words are spoken by Leonato in the very first scene of the play. A messenger has just arrived and tells Leonato that Claudio, a young Florentine, has "better bettered expectation" in battle...

Latest answer posted January 28, 2019 3:42 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

A number of key events are introduced in the opening scene of this hilarious comedy, which effectively introduces the main characters and some of the conflicts that will come to dominate the play....

Latest answer posted February 9, 2011 4:16 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Benedick and Beatrice, the sparring hearts at the center of William Shakespeare's comedy Much Ado About Nothing, are both witty, intelligent, and stubborn beyond belief. They both claim to be...

Latest answer posted May 23, 2018 5:28 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

In Much Ado about Nothing, both Beatrice and Benedick challenge gender roles, but it is important to realize that the play has set up a reference for proper gender norms from which Beatrice and...

Latest answer posted April 29, 2019 9:01 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

In Act 1, Scene 1 of Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing, we learn a few things about Beatrice: she has an adversarial relationship with Benedick, she is clever and witty, she doesn't fully accept...

Latest answer posted December 26, 2017 4:29 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Act III of Much Ado about Nothing highlights the motifs of communication and counterfeit. It is in this act that the two parallel storylines - Beatrice and Benedick/Hero and Claudio - are pushed...

Latest answer posted April 24, 2007 4:10 am UTC

1 educator answer

Much Ado About Nothing

Beatrice and Benedick have a past, you see. When they do come together again after the battle, they engage in a battle of wits. At the end of which, Beatrice mutters "I know you of...

Latest answer posted October 24, 2007 9:01 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

Don John is the illegitimate half brother of Don Pedro and filled with bitterness and resentment. He relates to Hero malevolently, using her as a tool with which to try to hurt Don Pedro through...

Latest answer posted April 5, 2019 8:14 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Much Ado About Nothing

At the beginning of the play, Beatrice is strongly opposed to marrying. Her uncle Leonato laments that she will never marry because she is too picky and harsh, and she cheerfully agrees. First, she...

Latest answer posted May 3, 2016 7:17 pm UTC

1 educator answer

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