To A Mouse Questions and Answers

To A Mouse

The mood in "To A Mouse" is one not only of sadness for what he has done to destroy the mouse's winter home while he was out ploughing. He also apologizes that the world of human beings has...

Latest answer posted November 5, 2010 4:23 am UTC

2 educator answers

To A Mouse

Burns's narrator addresses the mouse in this poem whose nest has been upended by a plough in November, just as winter is coming. He apologizes to the mouse, saying I’m truly sorry Man’s dominion...

Latest answer posted May 10, 2017 9:36 am UTC

2 educator answers

To A Mouse

The most obvious device used by Burns in this poem is personification: the entire poem is an address—or apostrophe—to a mouse, making the assumption that the mouse has human attributes,...

Latest answer posted January 30, 2018 10:14 am UTC

2 educator answers

To A Mouse

The speaker of "To a Mouse" expresses his regret for having destroyed the mouse's winter shelter and having now given it cause to fear its fellow man. This apology is certainly ironic as Robert...

Latest answer posted January 8, 2016 8:10 pm UTC

1 educator answer

To A Mouse

In the poem “To a Mouse,” a farmer speaks to a mouse about the unfortunate incident where he plowed up the mouse’s nest. The event is seen as regrettable because it was unintended and because the...

Latest answer posted November 10, 2019 1:21 am UTC

1 educator answer

To A Mouse

In response to your question about the loss of Mossgiel Farmhouse: You are correct in stating that the loss of the Mossgiel farmhouse was a contributing factor that inspired the poem To a Mouse....

Latest answer posted February 2, 2010 8:40 am UTC

1 educator answer

To A Mouse

When the narrator, while ploughing a field, destroys a mouse's nest, he speaks to the mouse as if it is a fellow human being. He states that he is the mouse's poor, earth-born companion,...

Latest answer posted February 13, 2016 11:02 pm UTC

1 educator answer

To A Mouse

In "To A Mouse," Burns argues that man has dominated animals and, more importantly, that this domination is wrong. This is clearly shown in the first and second stanzas, when the speaker apologizes...

Latest answer posted February 20, 2018 9:41 am UTC

2 educator answers

To A Mouse

I would suggest the following: In "To A Mouse," Robert Burns questions whether a human being is superior to a mouse. In Stanza 1, Burns states that he, personally, has no intention of killing the...

Latest answer posted January 25, 2011 7:52 am UTC

1 educator answer

To A Mouse

Throughout the first six stanzas of the poem, the speaker expresses his genuine sympathy for the plight of the mouse whose home has been destroyed by humans. Indeed, the speaker seems distraught...

Latest answer posted April 30, 2021 8:56 am UTC

1 educator answer

To A Mouse

It would be hard to deny the truth of Burns' poem that the best-laid plans of mice and men can go awry. Whether or not we've personally seen this happen in our own lives, or in the lives of people...

Latest answer posted February 11, 2020 2:55 pm UTC

1 educator answer

To A Mouse

In "To a Mouse," by Burns, the most important linguistic device used--the device that contributed to a change in literature and a new movement in literature--is the Scottish dialect. His use of...

Latest answer posted April 23, 2010 12:03 am UTC

2 educator answers

To A Mouse

The answer to your question about how the speaker feels about the mouse stealing grain is found in these lines: A daimen icker in a thrave'S a sma' request;I'll get a blessin wi' the lave,An'...

Latest answer posted April 6, 2018 7:54 pm UTC

1 educator answer

To A Mouse

The speaker, in "To a Mouse," is contemplating the catastrophe which has befallen the mouse with the destruction of its nest in the field, which he has inadvertently caused while plowing. He...

Latest answer posted October 21, 2018 5:08 am UTC

1 educator answer

To A Mouse

What is ironic about the poem is that he is using the mouse as a metaphor for the lower classes, the social strata which is unjustly chased and ran over by the higher classes, and by their...

Latest answer posted August 12, 2009 5:32 am UTC

1 educator answer

To A Mouse

In the Burns poem, "To A Mouse," when the speaker refers to the mouse as a fellow mortal, he is saying that we are all mortal, we all die. Mice and men alike live their short time on earth then...

Latest answer posted September 17, 2010 12:15 am UTC

2 educator answers

To A Mouse

This poem is in standard Habbie, also known as the Burns stanza. It is a six-line stanza rhyming aaabab. Lines 1, 2, 3, and 5 are in tetrameter (4 strong beats or accents per line), while lines 4...

Latest answer posted August 1, 2010 8:06 am UTC

2 educator answers

To A Mouse

In, "To a Mouse," by Robert Burns, the farmer's plow blade has just destroyed the mouse's "housie." The mouse, seeing the bare fields and knowing winter was coming fast, was hiding away "beneath...

Latest answer posted February 17, 2010 11:11 am UTC

2 educator answers

To A Mouse

"To a Mouse" has two inferred promises. Burns, saddened that he has disturbed this little mouse's winter home with his ploughing, promises that he will not begrudge the little creature what corn of...

Latest answer posted November 5, 2010 3:51 am UTC

2 educator answers

To A Mouse

You are right about the season. Robert Burns's poem, "To a Mouse," takes place late in the fall, after the harvest and just before December. You have probably picked up on clues in the text such...

Latest answer posted August 20, 2010 8:35 am UTC

1 educator answer