A Midsummer Night's Dream Questions and Answers

A Midsummer Night's Dream

This quotation from act 1, scene 1 of Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream ironically sets the tone for the entire play. It is spoken by Helena, who is in love with Demetrius (although Demetrius...

Latest answer posted May 23, 2021, 8:24 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

A Midsummer Night's Dream

The four main plots of A Midsummer Night's Dream are as follows: The Wedding of Theseus and Hippolyta This is the simplest of the four plots and would not constitute a story on its own. The duke of...

Latest answer posted April 24, 2021, 10:44 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

A Midsummer Night's Dream

These lines are spoken by Helena at the end of the first scene of Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream. At the beginning of the play, Helena is in love with Demetrius—who once wooed her—but he...

Latest answer posted June 15, 2019, 4:25 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Midsummer Night's Dream

Both Titania and Oberon are arguing over who gets to claim ownership of the Indian boy. Titania knew the boy's mother, who was a faithful servant to her, perhaps even a priestess (she describes the...

Latest answer posted April 7, 2021, 10:57 am (UTC)

7 educator answers

A Midsummer Night's Dream

A malapropism is the incorrect use of a word, often in an idiomatic expression, whereby the incorrect word sounds very similar to the intended, correct word. For example, in Shakespeare's Much Ado...

Latest answer posted January 5, 2020, 9:26 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Midsummer Night's Dream

In act 1, the central conflict involves Hermia, who is expected by her father, Egeus, to marry Demetrius. The problem is Hermia is in love with Lysander. Because of their love, she vows that she...

Latest answer posted May 4, 2020, 8:10 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

A Midsummer Night's Dream

eNotes editors can only answer one question at a time; others must be posted separately. In Shakespeare's play, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Theseus comments that love and imagination are similar. He...

Latest answer posted December 6, 2010, 6:40 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Midsummer Night's Dream

An epilogue is a speech and it almost like a PS (postscript) to the main body of, in this case a play. It can serve to bring closure to events or answer questions which may still confuse the...

Latest answer posted June 24, 2015, 6:01 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Midsummer Night's Dream

Puck doesn't explain precisely why he changes Bottom's head into an ass's head, but he does seem to resent that the uncouth mechanicals or "homespuns" are so near his queen, saying: What hempen...

Latest answer posted April 20, 2021, 2:34 am (UTC)

4 educator answers

A Midsummer Night's Dream

Because it is a comedy, this play doesn't weigh as heavily as some of Shakespeare's other works in a consideration of deep moral lessons. It is quite entertaining in a light and farcical way. The...

Latest answer posted November 20, 2020, 1:35 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Midsummer Night's Dream

The theme of love always raises many questions and in A Midsummer Night's Dream there are many instances which reveal that love can be fickle, unfair, intense, contradictory, irrational, painful...

Latest answer posted June 4, 2015, 8:00 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Midsummer Night's Dream

The line is spoken by Bottom in William Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream" Act III Scene 1. The full quotation is: [Bottom:] Methinks, mistress, you should have little reason for that. And...

Latest answer posted June 17, 2015, 3:31 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Midsummer Night's Dream

In act 2, scene 1 of William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream, Oberon, King of the Fairies, is having a disagreement with Titania, Queen of the Fairies, about a young Indian prince who...

Latest answer posted October 11, 2019, 4:46 pm (UTC)

4 educator answers

A Midsummer Night's Dream

Personification is a literary device that gives human qualities or characteristics to inanimate objects, ideas, animals, or abstractions. It's a popular form of figurative language, and so it...

Latest answer posted May 12, 2016, 8:51 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Midsummer Night's Dream

The climax of A Midsummer Night's Dream is act 3, scene 2. The climax is the point at which all of the tension in a story culminates—when the drama gets most intense. In act 3, scene 2 of this...

Latest answer posted May 10, 2021, 2:48 pm (UTC)

4 educator answers

A Midsummer Night's Dream

In the first scene of Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream, Hermia's father, Egeus, appeals to Theseus, the duke of Athens, to order Hermia to marry Demetrius, who Hermia refuses to marry. Egeus...

Latest answer posted March 31, 2020, 1:42 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

A Midsummer Night's Dream

In Puck's speech at the end of Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream, just as in the "parabasis" of ancient Greek Old Comedy, a character breaks the "fourth wall" and speaks directly to the...

Latest answer posted March 16, 2017, 7:19 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Midsummer Night's Dream

Before beginning a search for puns in William Shakespeare’s comedy A Midsummer Night’s Dream, consider providing a definition of pun, so that one knows what one is looking for. A pun occurs when...

Latest answer posted April 19, 2021, 4:05 pm (UTC)

4 educator answers

A Midsummer Night's Dream

In one of the most well-known lines from William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream, the mischievous sprite Puck, or Robin Goodfellow, says to the fairy king, Oberon, "Lord, what fools these...

Latest answer posted May 25, 2020, 10:38 am (UTC)

3 educator answers

A Midsummer Night's Dream

There are only nine scenes in A Midsummer Night's Dream, very few by the standards of a Shakespeare play. The most important of them is act 5, scene 1. This is the only scene in act 5, and it...

Latest answer posted November 21, 2020, 12:00 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Midsummer Night's Dream

The main conflict in A Midsummer Night’s Dream is that people want to make decisions for others. A conflict is a struggle between two characters, or between a character and an outside force. In...

Latest answer posted September 17, 2013, 6:16 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Midsummer Night's Dream

The literary devices used by Shakespeare throughout A Midsummer Night's Dream includes notable examples of witty, clever wordplay in the form of puns, malapropisms, and oxymorons. The "rude...

Latest answer posted January 5, 2020, 4:37 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Midsummer Night's Dream

The forest is a perfect setting for A Midsummer Night’s Dream. The words midsummer and night in the title suggest a story in which nature plays an important role. Midsummer is a time of...

Latest answer posted March 21, 2016, 2:50 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Midsummer Night's Dream

Shakespeare's comedy, A Midsummer Night's Dream, tells the story of young lovers and a troupe of actors, caught in the woods after dark, at the mercy of mischievous fairies who turn the humans'...

Latest answer posted February 16, 2011, 3:21 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Midsummer Night's Dream

Helena awakens in this scene to find Lysander and Demetrius both madly in love with her. Helena has no way of knowing this is due to Puck having dropped a love potion into their eyes, so she...

Latest answer posted June 28, 2019, 1:40 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Midsummer Night's Dream

At first glance, Lysander and Demetrius appear to be fairly interchangeable characters in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream. They both fall in love with the wrong woman. Lysander falls in...

Latest answer posted August 16, 2019, 1:47 am (UTC)

3 educator answers

A Midsummer Night's Dream

Critics have frequently remarked upon the "profusion of poetic imagery" with which Shakespeare's bountiful imagination endows the fairy world in A Midsummer Night's Dream. This delightful...

Latest answer posted June 6, 2017, 11:50 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Midsummer Night's Dream

Theseus kindly overrides Egeus to allow Lysander and Hermia to marry, but primarily he is bemused by love's irrationality and thus sees all four of the lovers' adventures as a form of madness or...

Latest answer posted May 29, 2016, 6:47 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

A Midsummer Night's Dream

In act three, scene one, Titania wakes up and instantly falls in love with Bottom. She falls in love with him because Oberon, her disgruntled husband, has sprinkled a love juice on her eyelids as...

Latest answer posted March 5, 2019, 7:58 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Midsummer Night's Dream

In Act III Scene 1 of A Midsummer Night's Dream, the craftsmen enter the woods in order to rehearse their play. After Bottom warns Quince that he will need two separate prologues, one for the men...

Latest answer posted May 19, 2015, 11:27 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Midsummer Night's Dream

Everything in A Midsummer Night's Dream hinges on the relationship of Hermia and Lysander. Without them, there would only be a partial play. These two are star crossed lovers feel they are burdened...

Latest answer posted February 8, 2016, 6:43 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Midsummer Night's Dream

Of all Shakespeare's plays, A Midsummer Night's Dream is the most magical. Magic is an element of the supernatural, as it's traditionally believed to come from outside the natural world. In other...

Latest answer posted October 28, 2020, 11:03 am (UTC)

3 educator answers

A Midsummer Night's Dream

This play seems to celebrate the power of imagination to alleviate the human errors that come from misuse of power. At the beginning of the play, everyone seems to be chafing under the constraints...

Latest answer posted February 20, 2019, 6:19 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

A Midsummer Night's Dream

Helena is very obviously a desperate woman. Having once given herself to Demetrius, she cannot get over the fact that he no longer loves her and does whatever she can to rectify the situation. She...

Latest answer posted January 2, 2009, 3:12 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Midsummer Night's Dream

The relationship between Titania and Bottom is supposed to be visually humorous to the audience, for obvious reasons. Titania, as the Queen of the Fairies, is supposed to represent something...

Latest answer posted March 22, 2019, 10:43 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Midsummer Night's Dream

In act 4 of A Midsummer Night's Dream, Titania, Nick Bottom, Helena, Hermia, Lysander, and Demetrius wake from their slumbers. All are surprised and confused by recent events. Before Titania wakes,...

Latest answer posted June 9, 2020, 2:43 am (UTC)

4 educator answers

A Midsummer Night's Dream

On the eve of his wedding to Hippolyta, Theseus is confronted with Hermia's disobedience. She wants to marry Lysander, the man she loves, but her father, Egeus, has decided she must marry...

Latest answer posted May 10, 2021, 1:00 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

A Midsummer Night's Dream

The main role of the mechanicals in A Midsummer's Night Dream is to provide comic relief, which is often the case with lower class characters in Shakespeare's plays. The mechanicals are six working...

Latest answer posted January 4, 2020, 4:35 am (UTC)

4 educator answers

A Midsummer Night's Dream

One reason the forest is an important setting in A Midsummer Night's Dream is that the forest creates a dark, wild, mysterious atmosphere in which the magical elements of Shakespeare's plot can be...

Latest answer posted August 3, 2012, 7:14 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Midsummer Night's Dream

Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream has two settings: Athens and the woods outside of Athens. While most of the play takes place in the woods, Athens is an important point of contrast in the...

Latest answer posted December 13, 2017, 7:37 pm (UTC)

4 educator answers

A Midsummer Night's Dream

Helena tells Demetrius that Hermia and Lysander have run away because she hopes that he will change his mind and fall for her. A Midsummer Night’s Dream is a simple story, really. Hermia and...

Latest answer posted September 3, 2014, 1:48 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Midsummer Night's Dream

In Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream, Oberon sees how much Helena loves Demetrius. Oberon instructs Puck (his fairy henchman) to seek out a flower in a place they once visited. While Puck...

Latest answer posted June 13, 2011, 2:07 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Midsummer Night's Dream

There are a lot of literary devices being used in this scene, but I would like to focus on the poetic aspects of the scene. Probably one of the first things that a reader or audience will notice is...

Latest answer posted February 16, 2019, 4:53 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

A Midsummer Night's Dream

In this section, Helena laments that Demetrius's love has turned from her to Hermia and then discusses love's attributes in general. Shakespeare has her use personification: in an extended...

Latest answer posted June 13, 2016, 11:39 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Midsummer Night's Dream

The climax provided in Act 3 occurs when Bottom’s head is replaced with that of an ass, and the anointed lovers gather together, argue, and fall asleep. A Midsummer Night’s Dream is broken up into...

Latest answer posted June 4, 2014, 2:24 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Midsummer Night's Dream

At this point in the play Hermia has been told by her father, Egeus, that she must marry Demetrius, even though Hermia would rather marry Lysander. Theseus, the Duke of Athens, has confirmed that...

Latest answer posted May 16, 2019, 3:19 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Midsummer Night's Dream

Props are any small objects that are used by actors in a play to help them tell the story, which exclude the set design. If we were to use as few props as possible with minimal set design, there...

Latest answer posted August 25, 2012, 5:59 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Midsummer Night's Dream

Shakespeare paints, in Helena, a portrait of someone so in love with her rejecting ex-lover, Demetrius, that nothing else matters to her... not her safety, not her self-respect, not her sense of...

Latest answer posted May 6, 2015, 5:59 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

A Midsummer Night's Dream

William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream fits the description of "romantic comedy" for at least two reasons: it focuses on the romantic relationships of characters, and it ends in marriages....

Latest answer posted July 29, 2019, 5:40 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

A Midsummer Night's Dream

The lines you cite are in Act II, Scene 2. First question: what Lysander is saying is that loving Hermia (who he used to love) instead of loving Helena would be like loving a crow instead of a dove...

Latest answer posted January 24, 2010, 1:50 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Showing 1-50 of 1264