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  • The Merchant of Venice
    In act 3, scene 2, Portia gives Bassanio a ring to solidify their marriage and tells him that if he ever gives it away, then their love is doomed. Nerissa also gives Gratiano a ring, and he...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    The answer to your question lies in act 5, scene 1. Jessica and Lorenzo talk while the music plays. During the conversation, Lorenzo tells Jessica that divine music is everywhere, from the smallest...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    It's the opening scene of The Merchant of Venice. Antonio enters with his two friends, Solanio and Salarino. Antonio is the first to speak: In sooth, I know not why I am so sad. It wearies me; you...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    Venice in the Elizabethan era was a multicultural hub of commerce, rivaling London as a port city and surpassing it in terms of its reputation for beauty. The setup of Venice was an attraction then...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    In no particular order, here is a list of five subplots that exist within Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice. There is a subplot involving a casket and Portia's suitors. Portia's father is not...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    2 educator answers

  • The Merchant of Venice
    First, we'll discuss examples of how Shylock lets revenge become a first priority. We can find two examples in Act 3 Scene 1, where Shylock is furious at both Jessica and Antonio. Shylock is...

    Asked by user4589417 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    Shylock's thirst for revenge comes back to haunt him in three ways. First, he is unable to collect the interest that would have been due him on the loans Antonio takes. Next, he loses his quest to...

    Asked by user4589417 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    Despite Shylock's portrayal as a heartless, greedy Jew, Shakespeare creates sympathy for the play's villain by depicting how Shylock is religiously persecuted, marginalized, and ridiculed because...

    Asked by user4589417 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    Shylock, one of the characters in Shakespeare's play The Merchant of Venice, is vengeful almost by definition. He is a moneylender, so he has complex and sometimes tense relationships with the...

    Asked by user4589417 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    Portia is a good role model for adolescent girls because she values her deceased father's wishes while also being independent and ingenious in her thinking, in a way that protects herself and...

    Asked by senapen on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    In Shakespeare's comedy The Merchant of Venice, Bassanio is one of several suitors of the central character, Portia of Belmont. Portia isn't only beautiful, she's rich: she's an heiress. It's easy...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    Portia is the heroine of the play The Merchant of Venice. The wealthy, intelligent heiress from Belmont marries Bassanio and ends up saving his friend Antonio's life at the end of the play. Antonio...

    Asked by enotes on via web

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  • The Merchant of Venice
    Shylock has had a dream, or rather a nightmare, involving moneybags. To him, they represent a bad omen, a premonition that something terrible is about to happen. As Shylock's moneylending business...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    Not really, no. Antonio has clearly made a very foolish decision in agreeing to bind himself to the bond and Shylock's onerous conditions. But Antonio's decision, though strange to us, does have a...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    Antonio, like most people, doesn't have much time for Shylock. But at least Shylock has a reputation for not lending money at exorbitant rates of interest. So when Antonio needs to get his hands on...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    The main issue many modern critics find of immediate relevance to contemporary culture is the issue of antisemitism. Many of the characters in the play think of Jews in stereotypical terms and...

    Asked by Kartik Gupta on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    Jessica's decision to elope with Lorenzo makes it pertinently clear that things at home are not happy at all. In Act 2, Scene 3, she exposes her cynicism when she tells Launcelot "Our house is...

    Asked by pagdaloosmita on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    Setting refers to the time, place, and circumstances in which the action of a literary work occurs. This obviously also affects the writing's atmosphere and tone. As far as place is concerned in...

    Asked by jaries10abgao on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    The main plot of Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice is the Antonio-Bassanio-Shylock plot, in which the merchant Antonio borrows money from the Jewish moneylender Shylock in order to fund...

    Asked by fabarya007 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    That's a little tough to answer since your subjective experience of the play will change the way how you think the audience would feel. However, I'll give you my opinion based on my own take on the...

    Asked by user5802041 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    This scene depicts a conversation between two of Antonio's friends, Salanio and Salarino - gentlemen we met in Act 1, when they were with him. The two are discussing our protagonist, Antonio, and...

    Asked by user2457373 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    Let's start with what's good about Antonio: He is sociable, loyal, caring and generous. We know he is social since we first meet him in a social situation with two of his friends, Salarino and...

    Asked by raeeshassan58 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    At the beginning of scene 2, Act II, Launcelot mentions one of the reasons why he should leave Shylock's service. In his monologue, he makes it clear that it is not an easy decision and is...

    Asked by hudazainal12345 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    Most of the themes in this scene are also themes in the larger play. Let us take the themes in the order they appear: In lines 1 - 29, the clown Launcelot is wrestling with himself about whether he...

    Asked by adityamalpani01 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    The verbal exchange between the prince of Morocco and Portia occurs at the beginning of Act ll, Scene 1. The prince has obviously arrived to chance his luck to win Portia's hand by participating in...

    Asked by harshithadwark on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Literature
    Shylock is a Jewish usurer who makes profits on his loans, so he resents the merchant Antonio, who lends money interest-free to people, which undercuts Shylock. How like a fawning publican he...

    Asked by user1749914 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    Shylock clearly spells out his reasons for hating Antonio. He compares him to a “fawning publican,” indicating he sees Antonio as sanctimonious and hypocritical. On top of that, Antonio is...

    Asked by user1749914 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    This play is certainly one of Shakespeare's best-loved plays, and, due to its themes of bigotry and suggested violence, one of his most controversial. Perhaps one of the reasons for its popularity...

    Asked by user7649730 on via web

    2 educator answers

  • The Merchant of Venice
    Antonio and Bassanio's friendship gets Antonio into serious trouble with Shylock, but it also rescues him from that trouble. The main plot of the play has to do with the "bond" (legal contract)...

    Asked by ektachaturvedi2 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    At the beginning of Act 1 scene 2, we are introduced to Portia and her handmaiden, Nerissa, who is also a friend and confidante, who are in conversation about Portia's deceased father's decision to...

    Asked by mailbhabatosh on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    The Prince of Morocco refers to his complexion when wooing Portia. He is aware of the racism against men with his skin color. Earlier, Portia expressed frustration at having to face yet another...

    Asked by ranjeetkumar076 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    In Act 3, Scene 4, Portia tells Lorenzo that he is in charge of her household until her husband returns. Portia then tells Lorenzo that she and Nerissa will be praying and contemplating alone in a...

    Asked by bnwx19 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    In one sense, Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice is certainly a comedy. Good largely triumphs over evil, and all of the main "good guys" end up with a happy ending: Bassanio and Portia live...

    Asked by user1801823 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    In Act one, Scene 2, Portia discusses with Nerissa the various reasons why she refuses to marry any of the previous suitors. After Portia lists why the Neapolitan prince, Count Palatine, and...

    Asked by kanishkmahajan333 on via web

    2 educator answers

  • The Merchant of Venice
    This is one of the more interesting questions about Shakespeare's play The Merchant of Venice. Shylock certainly functions as an antagonist to the young lovers in the play. Although he obviously...

    Asked by shadelenedemas on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    You must be referring to the Prince of Morocco's speech in Act 2, Scene 1, in which he says, Bring me the fairest creature northward born, Where Phoebus' fire scarce thaws the icicles, And let us...

    Asked by rishavcal2015 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    Antonio and his friends are on a street in Venice, a city of "psychic, dark corners," as Shakespearean critic Harold Bloom describes it. Antonio has fallen into one of these "dark corners" in his...

    Asked by sahilpatel3205 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    Nestor is not actually a character in The Merchant of Venice by William Shakespeare. Instead, he is one of the leaders of the Greeks in the Trojan War and figures prominently in Homer's Iliad....

    Asked by meherbains1995 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    By "Shylock's speech," I'm assuming that you are referring to Shylock's "Hath not a Jew eyes?" speech in Act 3, Scene 1, which is probably the moneylender's most famous speech (and perhaps the most...

    Asked by sohastiniski on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    The present is food ("a dish of doves"—line 124). This takes place in Act II, Scene 2. Gobbo has come to visit his son Launcelot after not seeing him for a few years. Launcelot has been working...

    Asked by swagatikasahu on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    Shylock says this of Antonio in Act 1, Scene 3. Here are lines 38 - 43: I hate him for he is a Christian; But more, for that in low simplicity He lends out money gratis and brings down The rate...

    Asked by user627159 on via web

    2 educator answers

  • The Merchant of Venice
    In Act one, Scene 1, Antonio is introduced as a character who is suffering from severe depression. Antonio laments about his mood and mentions that he cannot sleep or think clearly. Antonio tells...

    Asked by srinidhimateti on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    Prejudice in the form of anti-Semitism is significant throughout the play The Merchant of Venice. Shylock and his daughter Jessica are viewed with suspicion and treated differently because they are...

    Asked by user7858237 on via web

    2 educator answers

  • The Merchant of Venice
    In the opening scene of the play, Antonio laments about his melancholy attitude and wonders why he has become so depressed lately. Salerio suggests that Antonio is worried about his merchant ships...

    Asked by shalinidivyathyagaraj on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    Both stories turn on the importance of the exact text of a bizarre legal document, and both involve Portia. The Caskets In the casket story, the legal document is Portia's father's will, which...

    Asked by gurneetsaini98 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    To help you better understand Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice, here is a quick explanation of some of the basic aspects of the text: The basic plot of the play revolves around the characters...

    Asked by w14089 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    Portia is the intelligent, beautiful heroine of the play The Merchant of Venice. She is a wealthy heiress who lives in Belmont and is forced to obey her father's will by marrying the suitor who...

    Asked by najmealam0 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    In Act 2, Scene 3, Jessica is saying goodbye to Launcelot the clown, who is leaving his job as her father's servant to go and work for Bassanio. She says she will miss him, because his jokes...

    Asked by sathyakrish457 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    In Act four, Scene 1, Portia is attempting to settle the dispute between Shylock and Antonio. After Shylock admits to the bond, Portia tells Shylock that he must be merciful. She demands that...

    Asked by rupali0805 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • The Merchant of Venice
    In Act three, Scene 4, Lorenzo praises Portia for being noble and understanding in regards to her husband's friendship with Antonio. Portia responds by saying that she never regrets doing a good...

    Asked by aishukittur on via web

    1 educator answer

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