Mending Wall Questions and Answers

Mending Wall

There are many ways of looking at this poem, which is what makes it an interesting piece to think about. Its theme is the conflict between tradition and innovation. In the poem, two neighbors mend...

Latest answer posted May 13, 2020, 12:48 pm (UTC)

5 educator answers

Mending Wall

The old saying “Good fences make good neighbors” simply means that having solid boundaries between my property and yours encourages us to respect one another. The idea is that if we can both see...

Latest answer posted January 10, 2021, 10:36 am (UTC)

4 educator answers

Mending Wall

In general, when you say this phrase, you mean establishing boundaries between you and your neighbor helps you both know how to act and respect each other's space and privacy. For example, if you...

Latest answer posted May 5, 2016, 9:09 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Mending Wall

The main symbol in the poem is the wall itself. The wall in question is a low stone structure that marks the dividing line between the speaker's farm and his neighbor's farm. Every winter, the wall...

Latest answer posted November 28, 2020, 11:15 am (UTC)

3 educator answers

Mending Wall

The speaker of Robert Frost's poem entitled "Mending Wall" does not see any need for a wall between his property and that of his neighbor; he also finds walls unnatural. In the opening line, the...

Latest answer posted December 16, 2017, 12:55 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Mending Wall

The fact that the speaker does not specify what, precisely, is the "Something" that "sends the frozen-ground-swell" under the fence could mean that the word something refers to nature, as another...

Latest answer posted September 12, 2017, 12:05 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

Mending Wall

We keep the wall between us as we go. The central metaphor in this poem is the wall itself. It comes to represent the divisions between people, things that keep them apart. The speaker notes that...

Latest answer posted August 6, 2019, 11:22 am (UTC)

4 educator answers

Mending Wall

A critical appreciation of a poem is a reading that generally considers a poem's meaning, its rhythm and rhyme scheme, its tone, its use of language, and so on. You can discuss all of these...

Latest answer posted January 19, 2021, 10:48 am (UTC)

3 educator answers

Mending Wall

I think the narrator is referring, in part, to the darkness of the past, the darkness of maintaining a tradition that no longer seems relevant. The neighbor who insists on keeping the wall claims...

Latest answer posted October 4, 2016, 11:51 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Mending Wall

“Mending Wall” begins with statements about walls, presented in third person. The perspective switches in Line 6 to a first-person speaker who explains their habit of coordinating wall repairs with...

Latest answer posted May 24, 2020, 6:42 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Mending Wall

The lines “something there is that doesn’t love a wall” and “good fences make good neighbors” are repeated. Repetition is used in poems to add emphasis and highlight significant themes. In this...

Latest answer posted February 17, 2016, 6:48 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Mending Wall

Frost uses anaphora in this poem. In this literary device, the first word or words of a line are repeated in consecutive lines. Frost does this twice, in both cases repeating the word "and": And...

Latest answer posted April 9, 2020, 10:38 pm (UTC)

4 educator answers

Mending Wall

A simile is a comparison that uses the words 'like' or 'as.' As other answers have noted, there is but one simile in this poem: I see him there Bringing a stone grasped firmly by the top In each...

Latest answer posted April 7, 2020, 1:42 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

Mending Wall

In the poem "Mending Wall," the term "old-stone savaged armed" is used to describe the neighbor. The speaker refers to the neighbor as an "old-stone savage armed" because he is old fashioned. He...

Latest answer posted November 25, 2011, 12:13 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Mending Wall

"Mending Wall" by Robert Frost is a poem in which Frost contemplates why he and his friendly neighbor have a wall between their two properties. He isn't enemies with his neighbor, they don't live...

Latest answer posted June 14, 2009, 10:48 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Mending Wall

Perhaps the greatest irony in the poem "Mending Wall" is that the speaker continues to help rebuild the wall even as he realizes he disagrees with its presence. As the poem progresses, the speaker...

Latest answer posted November 18, 2019, 9:24 pm (UTC)

4 educator answers

Mending Wall

"Mending Wall" is one of Robert Frost's most famous poems. When you are asked about the form of something, you need to start with the very basics. At root, the form is "poetry." Delving more...

Latest answer posted April 6, 2020, 1:19 pm (UTC)

5 educator answers

Mending Wall

The erosion of the fence and the apple trees are personified. Personification is the description of something innate or not human as if it were a person. For example, there is some phantom force...

Latest answer posted March 1, 2016, 2:31 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Mending Wall

The speaker of this poem is a man who questions the importance of the walls we put up- both physical and emotional. He starts the poem with the contemplation, “Something there is that doesn’t love...

Latest answer posted March 9, 2016, 11:38 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Mending Wall

The speaker clearly refers to forces of nature in the second line of the poem as being responsible for the wall's deterioration. He mentions that the ground becomes frozen and this causes cracks in...

Latest answer posted April 28, 2015, 6:50 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Mending Wall

The speaker doesn't like the wall. He begins the poem by stating, Something there is that doesn't love a wall,That sends the frozen-ground-swell under it,And spills the upper boulders in the...

Latest answer posted April 30, 2018, 11:22 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Mending Wall

We have to use a spell to make them balance: 'Stay where you are until our backs are turned!' We wear our fingers rough with handling them. Oh, just another kind of out-door game, One on a side....

Latest answer posted May 2, 2010, 2:15 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Mending Wall

Here is the line in context: He will not go behind his father's saying, And he likes having thought of it so well He says again, "Good fences make good neighbors." "He" refers to the...

Latest answer posted April 12, 2009, 3:27 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Mending Wall

In "The Mending Wall," the speaker is a practical man who sees himself as more modern, free thinking, and rational than his traditional neighbor. The speaker is irritated about having to the repair...

Latest answer posted August 6, 2020, 11:43 am (UTC)

3 educator answers

Mending Wall

According to the poet, it seems that hunters come by the wall during the winter and remove stones in order to flush rabbits out of their hiding places within the wall. By tearing down sections of...

Latest answer posted January 13, 2019, 5:20 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Mending Wall

The speaker of the poem certainly thinks that repairing the wall is a complete waste of time. The two men go through the same tedious ritual every year without any compelling reason. The speaker's...

Latest answer posted May 25, 2018, 6:34 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Mending Wall

Elves are small, often mischievous supernatural creatures from folklore that are known to cause damage. They often become a scapegoat when things go wrong. In "Mending Wall," the elves are a...

Latest answer posted January 7, 2021, 12:51 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Mending Wall

In the first 5 lines of the poem "The Mending Wall" by Robert Frost, Frost indicated that the earth doesn't like a wall, because the wall keeps crumbling on her, and doesn't stay intact. It is...

Latest answer posted June 14, 2009, 10:58 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Mending Wall

The speaker in the poem is a thoughtful man, hard-working, practical, and discerning. As he works with his neighbour to repair the wall dividing their property, he questions the necessity of even...

Latest answer posted April 6, 2008, 3:58 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Mending Wall

One of the great things about poetry is that it is intended to evoke a response from the reader, but each reader need not have an identical response. Thus, when discussing what something in a poem...

Latest answer posted May 23, 2016, 3:57 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Mending Wall

The main theme of the poem is community. The narrator and the neighbor don't appear to have much in common and do not socialize with one another. As one first reads the poem, the wall seems an...

Latest answer posted October 3, 2016, 11:34 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Mending Wall

The two characters are the speaker and the neighbor. The speaker is curious and inquisitive, and the neighbor believes that keeping a fence between them is the best way to maintain good relations....

Latest answer posted February 17, 2012, 3:11 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Mending Wall

In "Mending Wall," the speaker describes participating in the annual spring ritual of joining his neighbor to repair the stone wall that runs between their properties. The speaker embodies modern...

Latest answer posted January 6, 2021, 11:51 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Mending Wall

The speaker of the poem thinks that the wall is somewhat unnatural, and he believes that there is "Something... that doesn't love a wall." Nature, for example, makes the frozen ground swell up...

Latest answer posted February 8, 2020, 8:23 pm (UTC)

5 educator answers

Mending Wall

In Mending Wall the speaker, an apple farmer and his neighbor "set the wall between us once again" after it has inevitably been broken down by natural events after the " frozen-ground-swell" or...

Latest answer posted May 28, 2013, 6:58 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Mending Wall

Frost's poem "Mending Wall" is a contemplative journey through Frost's thoughts as he ponders what purpose the stone wall between him and his neighbor really serves. Personally, he doesn't really...

Latest answer posted May 6, 2009, 4:35 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Mending Wall

The speaker views his neighbor as being a man who lives according to tradition without thinking. Each spring, his neighbor insists that he and the speaker restore the breaks in the stone wall that...

Latest answer posted January 26, 2009, 6:34 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Mending Wall

In Robert Frost’s poem “Mending Wall,” the speaker describes how he has often repaired the stone wall separating his farm from his neighbor’s farm. He notes that the wall needs to be repaired...

Latest answer posted October 9, 2011, 3:02 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Mending Wall

Assonance, consonance and alliteration are all literary devices based upon sound, and used most often in poetry—they are what gives poetry a "musical, lilting" feel. All of these devices are based...

Latest answer posted March 15, 2012, 6:17 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Mending Wall

The narrator and his neighbor have a disagreement about the importance of mending the wall between their properties. The narrator thinks that mending the wall every year is silly. They have no...

Latest answer posted August 31, 2019, 2:36 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Mending Wall

The speaker seems to feel that, because the gaps keep forming, there is some element in the world "that doesn't love a wall." Nature "sends the frozen-ground-swell under it" so that the rocks on...

Latest answer posted March 14, 2019, 11:50 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Mending Wall

This line contains some figurative language and should not be read literally. The speaker and his neighbor are not witches that cast an actual magic spell on the stones to make them stay in fence...

Latest answer posted August 17, 2020, 11:38 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Mending Wall

As another educator has mentioned, Frost employs a few tones as he progresses through this poem. However, if I had to label the entire message of the poem with a singular tone, I'd go with...

Latest answer posted February 2, 2020, 2:16 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

Mending Wall

There are positive and negative aspects to the wall and this adds to the complicated notion of the relationship between the two neighbors. Every spring, the two neighbors meet in order to repair...

Latest answer posted March 24, 2016, 11:02 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Mending Wall

Parallel structure, or parallelism, is a literary technique in which two or more phrases or sentences in a short story or a poem, for example, repeat the same grammatical structure, but with one or...

Latest answer posted August 1, 2020, 3:24 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Mending Wall

The wall is a literal, physical wall. But it also is a metaphor for the emotional wall between the speaker and his neighbor. The speaker claims that something doesn't love the wall. The spring thaw...

Latest answer posted October 21, 2015, 3:55 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Mending Wall

The wall being mended in Robert Frost's "Mending Wall" is made of stones and runs along the boundary between the properties of the speaker and his neighbor. The speaker, with lighthearted...

Latest answer posted January 6, 2021, 11:16 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Mending Wall

As another reviewer said, you could look at "mending" either as an action being performed by the speaker and the neighbor or as modifying the type of wall they are working on together. The title is...

Latest answer posted January 30, 2019, 7:28 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Mending Wall

This poem presents two view of a wall between two orchards. I lived in New England, and these walls are somtimes low walls that were originally intended to keep cows in their pasture (doesn't take...

Latest answer posted May 6, 2011, 9:44 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Mending Wall

When the narrator says, "He is all pine and I am apple orchard," he does not actually mean that his neighbor is made of pine and the speaker is made of apple orchard. He means that his neighbor's...

Latest answer posted August 27, 2017, 2:46 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

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