Questions and Answers for Medea

Medea

To understand the Jason of "Medea", one must study him in the myth of "Jason and the Golden Fleece". In this story we learn how Jason was only allowed to take his throne after he had passed several...

Latest answer posted May 30, 2011 3:29 am UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

The attitude displayed by Medea is not necessarily all that different from what is felt and displayed by some women today. The strong-minded, half-supernatural Medea was just an extreme case; but...

Latest answer posted December 7, 2015 4:04 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

Both women are shown as extremely strong. However, their strength is limited by the conditions in which they live. Their demonstrations of power are not active solutions based on strength....

Latest answer posted April 4, 2014 12:23 am UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

Euripides' Medea, first staged in 431 BCE, was one of the most horrifying plays to come to the ancient Athenian theater. In the play, Medea is responsible for the deaths of Creon, Creon's daughter,...

Latest answer posted November 23, 2011 1:27 am UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

Class functions as a locus of power in Medea. When Jason and Medea arrive in Corinth, Jason quickly forgets the favors that Medea has done for him and weds King Creon's daughter Creusa. Medea is...

Latest answer posted July 6, 2010 10:23 am UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

I am not sure if "fire" is a theme in the play. I think that "fire" can be a concept or a symbol in displaying Medea's rage and her intensity of emotion. "Fire" can be a symbol for her vengeance....

Latest answer posted March 1, 2011 6:59 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

Throughout her speech, Medea uses the first person plural, including her audience with herself, claiming to speak for all women and to share the same tribulations. This is a daring strategy, since...

Latest answer posted May 11, 2020 1:41 am UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

Because, in her revenge, she kills innocents. Her children are not at fault for their father's infidelities. Medea not only exacts revenge on Jason, but makes the children pay with their lives as...

Latest answer posted October 9, 2007 11:00 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

In Aristotle's Poetics, a tragic hero is defined as a person of high rank who is brought low by a tragic flaw. The tragic hero's own actions are the catalyst for their ultimate fate, and this fate...

Latest answer posted April 30, 2020 12:07 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

Medea is an ancient Greek tragedy that was written by the ancient Greek poet and dramatist Euripides. It is based on the mythological story of Jason and Medea and their tragic relationship. There...

Latest answer posted February 10, 2020 1:24 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

Medea is a woman who has been wronged and a vicious murderer. At the end of the play, the audience is left contemplating the horror of her children's murder, along with the fact that Medea herself...

Latest answer posted August 25, 2020 7:10 am UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

In Euripides Medea, women have only limited freedom of action, reflecting the actual situation of Athenian society at the time when it was written. The female character who appears to be most...

Latest answer posted October 11, 2011 7:54 am UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

Euripides Medea has one of the strongest female heroines of Greek tragedy. Because of this, it is tempting to read it anachronistically as a sort of proto-feminist drama. This would be a mistake....

Latest answer posted October 11, 2011 7:41 am UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

Medea is a sorceress who is guided by passion, not laws.Consumed by her love for Jason, she helps him to escape from her father, even killing her own brother in the process. She is the extreme...

Latest answer posted November 25, 2010 12:15 am UTC

2 educator answers

Medea

In Ancient Greek mythology, Hecate was the goddess of magic, witchcraft, and the night. In Euripides's Medea, it's no exaggeration to say that she provides the title character with the very...

Latest answer posted September 4, 2019 8:22 am UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

The passions present in the play are the excessive amounts of emotion- both love and hate. The lesson is that moderation is best in terms of either of these passions, because excessive amounts will...

Latest answer posted November 8, 2007 2:01 am UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

The portraits of Clytemnestra in Aeschylus’ Agamemnon and Medea in Euripides' Medea do not necessarily reflect what would have been the playwrights' attitudes towards ordinary women in classical...

Latest answer posted May 14, 2012 4:28 am UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

Because drama is, in ancient terms, pure mimesis with no diegesis, events occuring offstage must be reported. Where, in a novel, the backstory or events not seen by a viewpoint character can be...

Latest answer posted October 24, 2011 11:39 am UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

Going to a play in ancient Greek times was as much a religious/social experience as an entertainment event. Physically, the open amphitheatres provided plenty of democratic opportunities for class...

Latest answer posted May 20, 2012 10:51 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

The terrible acts of the title character of Euripides's Medea would seem to make her one of the most barbaric characters of Greek drama. In fact, she is the only character in the surviving canon...

Latest answer posted April 21, 2020 12:50 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

Aegeus offers Medea refuge in Athens, but he makes it clear that she must get there on her own. He is willing to help her, but he doesn't want to be actively involved in her actions. Aegeus is...

Latest answer posted July 30, 2010 2:05 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

I think that Euripides is suggesting that unchecked revenge hurts more than the intended target. The Chorus does not deny Medea's voice and understands her anger and her bitterness towards Jason...

Latest answer posted May 1, 2012 10:16 am UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

Medea is a very passionate story - one filled with passionate love as well as passionate hate, and it is a thin line that separates the two. Medea's love for Jason and their children turns to such...

Latest answer posted December 24, 2007 4:59 am UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

There are three components in the statement that can be evaluated. The extent to which any element or the entire statement is “true,” however, is open to debate, as the statement calls for an...

Latest answer posted April 7, 2019 7:24 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Medea

Something, too, we have to remember is that Jason makes assumptions about "Greek" women, of which Medea is not. In fact, after Medea kills his boys, he states that a Greek woman would...

Latest answer posted March 20, 2008 2:15 am UTC

2 educator answers

Medea

When looking at the characters of Medea and Jason, you can make many comparisons, which can turn into some very interesting essays. Here are some suggestions. The first thing that you can do is...

Latest answer posted June 27, 2013 7:22 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

The monologue by Medea establishes her side of the story. We learn prior to this that Jason has left her to marry the princess and that Medea is angry and sad over this turn of events. The Chorus...

Latest answer posted July 30, 2010 1:53 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

That is a good question and I can understand your confusion. The play was originally written by Euripides and he certainly has the more famous play. In fact, in the ancient world, it was one of the...

Latest answer posted November 23, 2009 2:40 am UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

I do not necessarily Medea's actions as reflective of a statement on the Hellenistic Greek world view. I think that in order for this to be the case, there needs to be a complete affirmation that...

Latest answer posted August 12, 2012 7:24 am UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

Medea's opening speech establishes her situation and motivations. It outlines her plight in a manner designed to elicit sympathy not only for her current position but also for the vengeance that...

Latest answer posted April 30, 2020 7:25 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

The character of Jason in the play is negative, perhaps because in Greek tragedies the hero must have some kind of "tragic flaw." Jason's flaw might be greed or love of power that...

Latest answer posted November 19, 2007 6:29 am UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

The sense of control and sense of deliberation that the Nurse possesses is something that Medea lacks. These traits are evident in the selection of lines featured. The Nurse is one who favors a...

Latest answer posted April 30, 2012 9:56 am UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

In Medea's first monologue, she reflects on the grievances that she has against Jason. She recalls that she has abandoned her homeland and betrayed her father to help Jason in battle and to become...

Latest answer posted February 26, 2010 6:50 am UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

The chorus in Medea makes and elaborates upon the following observation: And I claim that with human beings those with no experience of children, those who have never given birth, such people have...

Latest answer posted May 24, 2020 1:17 am UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

Jason is one of the heroes of Greek mythology. His uncle, Pelias, wanted to make sure that Jason didn't challenge him for the throne, so he sent Jason off on an "impossible" mission--to...

Latest answer posted October 5, 2008 4:45 am UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

Freud said that the Greek play Oedipus Rex was effective because it dealt with a basic human instinct. A boy unconsciously wishes to murder his father and marry his mother. The play Medea also...

Latest answer posted April 3, 2014 9:05 am UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

I think that Medea is able to redress the inequality between the sexes through assertion of her own voice through her own actions. She does not take a passive point of view in her predicament....

Latest answer posted October 10, 2011 7:44 am UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

eNotes offers a free guide called "How to Write a Compare-and-Contrast Essay". Please see the link below for more information.

Latest answer posted January 6, 2009 1:03 am UTC

2 educator answers

Medea

Many of the salient elements of the plot of "Medea" are revealed indirectly. First, one can assume that most of the original audience would have been familiar with the entire story before seeing...

Latest answer posted October 20, 2011 11:17 am UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

I think that Euripides's work reveals a few elements about Greek society that is quite telling. Overall, the work demonstrates how destructive the Classical vision of passion can actually be. The...

Latest answer posted March 27, 2011 8:58 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Medea

When describing women, the Greek historian Thucydides argued that women should be "spoken of as little as possible among men, whether for good or for ill." The Classical construction of women was...

Latest answer posted November 6, 2014 12:27 am UTC

1 educator answer

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