Medea Questions and Answers

Medea

This is a great question. As you correctly note, there are two main versions of the story. However, there were alternate endings. Timothy Gantz has written a great book on the various strands of...

Latest answer posted October 26, 2011, 8:36 pm (UTC)

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Medea

Given the violence that Medea carries out in the course of Euripides' play, it is difficult to see how she could be either a victim of the gods (with the possible exception of Aphrodite and Eros)...

Latest answer posted December 3, 2011, 3:42 am (UTC)

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Medea

I think that Seneca does create Medea a frightful character in order to bring out a comment on the audience. Seneca takes the basic Greek myth and "stylizes" it to be accepted by his audience....

Latest answer posted November 30, 2011, 6:51 pm (UTC)

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Medea

In Euripides's version, Medea is offstage as the work opens up and her difficulties are communicated through her nurse. Medea is alone and she is weeping in anguish over what has happened to her....

Latest answer posted November 29, 2011, 8:43 pm (UTC)

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Medea

This is a good question. Euripides's version of the tragedy portrays Medea in a more sympathetic light than Seneca's version. Right from the beginning, the audience has a different feeling. Let me...

Latest answer posted November 29, 2011, 8:10 pm (UTC)

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Medea

In answering this question it's important to understand Medea's condition in its social context. Ancient Greek society was deeply patriarchal; women were without economic or political power and...

Latest answer posted April 26, 2020, 10:59 am (UTC)

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