"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys Questions and Answers

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

Let us start with Hally's relationship with his parents. He does not have much of a relationship with his parents. Hally's relationship with his father is terrible. That is mainly because Hally's...

Latest answer posted June 30, 2017 2:35 pm UTC

2 educator answers

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

Hally names Charles Darwin as his first "man of magnitude," and he names Leo Tolstoy as his second man of magnitude. Hally defends both men as being geniuses and men that "benefited all mankind."...

Latest answer posted November 5, 2018 4:39 pm UTC

2 educator answers

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

Hally's relationship with Sam and Willie is relatively friendly by the standards of apartheid South Africa given that Hally is white and that Sam and Willie are black. But the dynamics of power are...

Latest answer posted May 19, 2019 4:52 am UTC

2 educator answers

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

The audience's impressions of Hally's father derive primarily from Hally himself, as his father does not have a speaking role in the play. When Hally receives a phone call from his mother, who is...

Latest answer posted July 6, 2018 10:02 am UTC

2 educator answers

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

In terms of a plot that moves characters from setting to setting and event to event, this play has very little plot. The entire play takes place in one room and is focused on the conversations...

Latest answer posted July 19, 2017 2:01 pm UTC

2 educator answers

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

Hally has a negative relationship with his father, who is an amputee and relies on Hally to take care of him. Hally says during a phone call with his mother, "I'm not being disrespectful, but I'm...

Latest answer posted July 1, 2016 5:41 pm UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

On the telephone Hally learns his father is coming home from the hospital that day, which follows a scene about Sam and ballroom dancing, a metaphor for “a world without collisions” that Sam...

Latest answer posted June 30, 2007 1:48 am UTC

2 educator answers

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

To be honest and fair to the text, Sam does not give a specific reason why he chooses Abraham Lincoln. Sam states his choice for a man of great magnitude, and Hally immediately begins poking fun at...

Latest answer posted April 21, 2019 4:21 pm UTC

2 educator answers

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

Initially, Hally sees Sam and his love of ballroom dancing as an instrument he can use to antagonize his racist teacher. Hally positively revels in the mischief he can cause by writing an essay on...

Latest answer posted April 10, 2019 7:43 am UTC

2 educator answers

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

That's really funny that you ask, because I thought the exact same thing when I first read the piece. I don't know for sure why the title is what it is, but I do have a couple of ideas. First,...

Latest answer posted July 14, 2015 8:16 pm UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

Hally's relationship with both of his parents can be described with the same word. His relationship with his mother and with his father is broken. I might consider that Hally respects his mother...

Latest answer posted March 12, 2019 10:56 pm UTC

2 educator answers

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

Sam and Willie regard ballroom dancing as important because it represents life perfected. When he is speaking about the perfection of the dance floor, Sam explains to Hally, "There's no collisions...

Latest answer posted April 30, 2016 1:03 am UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

In "Master Harold". . .and the boys, the historical context of the play is particularly important as the story is set during the beginnings of South African apartheid. The present line of the play...

Latest answer posted April 27, 2016 11:37 pm UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

In Master Harold ... And the Boys, the larger meaning speaks of abandoning the set ways of society's dictates along with abandoning the psychologically governing and entrenched ways of family...

Latest answer posted June 11, 2011 10:00 am UTC

2 educator answers

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

I think there are a number of potential overall messages present in this play, and individual audience members will gravitate in slightly different directions regarding what the specific, overall...

Latest answer posted June 12, 2019 12:22 am UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

Race and equality are themes in the play. Hally and Sam appear at first to be much closer than servant and master. In fact, Sam is much more of a father figure to young Hally than Hally's actual...

Latest answer posted August 25, 2015 12:25 am UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

As with most people with a negative outlook on life, Hally's pessimism derives largely from his childhood experiences. For one thing, he's had the profound misfortune to grow up in a troubled home...

Latest answer posted August 29, 2018 6:32 am UTC

2 educator answers

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

In Fugard's Master Harold and the Boys, Hally is a 17 year white boy living in apartheid South Africa. Two of his childhood friends are black men employed at his father's cafe--Sam and Willie....

Latest answer posted September 19, 2011 10:16 am UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

In "MASTER HAROLD". . .and the boys, Willie experiences the change that Sam hopes Hally will also experience: he admits his wrongs and consciously chooses to walk away from his privilege. At the...

Latest answer posted May 1, 2016 1:30 pm UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

In "MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the boys, Hally's relationship with both Sam and Willie was close when Hally was young. Hally would often hide under the bed in Sam and Willie's room so that his mother...

Latest answer posted April 27, 2016 10:40 pm UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

During the course of the play, Willie makes references to some of the issues that he is dealing with in his life. First, his dance partnership with Hilda Samuels is suffering because she has not...

Latest answer posted June 25, 2012 8:57 pm UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

MASTER HAROLD...and the Boys is set in apartheid South Africa, and tells the story of a young white male (who represents the author, himself) and the way in which his once-strong friendship with...

Latest answer posted November 10, 2012 11:38 pm UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

In "MASTER HAROLD". . .and the Boys, the society in which the play is set is crucial to the development of character and theme. The play is set during the apartheid era in South Africa, and the...

Latest answer posted January 2, 2016 2:35 pm UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

The contrast in the relationship between Sam and Hally near the end of the play occurs primarily because Hally is not mature enough to understand his role in the sociopolitical landscape of 1950...

Latest answer posted June 25, 2012 7:33 pm UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

Hope is an interesting concept and/or theme for this play. In general, I don't think this play is all that hopeful of a play; however, there are hopeful moments in the play. One such instance...

Latest answer posted April 16, 2018 12:39 pm UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

I personally would not characterize Sam and Hally's relationship as friendship. That doesn't mean I think they are enemies or something like that. I just think it is improper to call them friends....

Latest answer posted August 15, 2015 2:44 pm UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

It is not clear if this question is asking about what readers learn about characters over the course of the play or what readers learn as a result of seeing the play as a whole. One thing that we...

Latest answer posted March 19, 2018 10:14 pm UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

In "Master Harold". . .and the Boys, the most forceful symbol of the instability in Hally and Sam's relationship is the moment when Hally spits in Sam's face. This moment illustrates the racial...

Latest answer posted May 21, 2016 2:23 pm UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

In the play Master Harold...and the Boys by Athol Fugard, dancing is one of the two major symbols Fugard uses, the other being the brown-paper kite. Sam dreams of a collision-free ballroom floor...

Latest answer posted January 29, 2010 8:00 am UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

One of the major themes of the play "Master Harold". . .and the Boys is the role that privilege plays in our lives. The play opens with Willie telling Sam that his girlfriend Hilda has not shown...

Latest answer posted May 11, 2016 8:44 pm UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

In Fugard's "MASTER HAROLD". . .and the boys, Hally experiences a sense of helplessness and rage at his parents. When his father gets on the telephone, Hally lies and tells him that he is glad that...

Latest answer posted October 5, 2016 3:56 pm UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

Two specific things that tend to stick out about Willie is that, a) he starts out the play on his knees, which is a symbol of oppression, b) he seems to accept his position as servant being the...

Latest answer posted June 15, 2009 5:42 am UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

The play MASTER Harold...and the Boys is Anthol Fugard's own expiation of what was one of the most pivotal moments in his life: the loss of one of his best friends, Sam, and the moment when he...

Latest answer posted August 30, 2012 5:28 pm UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

In the ballroom dance in "Master Harold". . .and the boys, Sam says that people play out their dream of having a world in which there are "no collisions." Sam and Willie think it funny when Hally...

Latest answer posted May 1, 2016 1:48 pm UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

In the play, dancing represents the only freedom that Willie and Sam, as black men in South Africa, are able to have. They dream of competing in a dance contest, as dancing involves forgetting...

Latest answer posted November 13, 2017 1:03 am UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

Fugard's powerful play Master Harold and the Boys concerns relationships--relationships between blacks and whites in apartheid South Africa as well as father/ son relationship. Halle is taught...

Latest answer posted September 18, 2011 12:26 am UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

The importance of ballroom dancing emerges as a critical metaphor in Fugard's drama. Hally questions what happens in ballroom competition when contestants bump into one another. Upon receiving...

Latest answer posted February 26, 2015 1:38 pm UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

In "Master Harold". . .and the boys, Hally's mother and Hilda Samuels may be compared and contrasted based on their apparent relationships with their significant others. Hally's mother appears to...

Latest answer posted June 25, 2012 7:49 pm UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

I think that the question might be a bit more broadened that you anticipate. It seems to me that the question is asking about the contexts in which it is created and how this enhances the overall...

Latest answer posted August 15, 2010 3:07 am UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

"Master Harold". . .and the boys suggests that the consequences of injustice in South African society are the loss of dignity and humanity. In the play, Hally recounts his best memory: the flying...

Latest answer posted May 1, 2016 1:18 pm UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

In order to understand, and appreciate, Athol Fugard's play MASTER HAROLD....and the Boys, one has to further analyze the historical context of the play, and the social context in which it is...

Latest answer posted May 6, 2012 8:50 pm UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

In the play, Hally's parents play a functional, yet distant role in his life. Hally's father is continually sick (and he has a drinking problem), so Hally's mother finds herself in the position of...

Latest answer posted April 26, 2010 9:59 am UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

One could argue that, as with any good dramatist, Fugard wants to get his message across by showing, rather than telling. In other words, he doesn't need to state explicitly that his play is about...

Latest answer posted December 3, 2018 9:09 am UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

In "Master Harold". . .and the boys, Hally's clothes are wrinkled and he looks unkempt when he enters the scene. Hally is seventeen, so one assumes that he should be able to look after his own...

Latest answer posted April 27, 2016 10:17 pm UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

Hally's at that difficult age where he's still in the process of growing up. As such, he's somewhat immature—constantly looking for ways to troll his teachers, whom he neither likes nor respects....

Latest answer posted September 26, 2019 9:12 am UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

Harold argues that he will likely fail his exams if his mother brings his dad home from the hospital. Harold really does not want his father to come home, which seems odd at first. But as the...

Latest answer posted June 8, 2016 12:21 am UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

Hally Fugard, the seventeen-year-old son in the story, has been raised in the midst of apartheid South Africa. He's been taught that nonwhites are inferior. The two black men in his life,...

Latest answer posted July 17, 2007 2:17 am UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

In "Master Harold". . .and the boys, Hally must have been around ten years old when Sam made the kite for him. During the conversation at the tea shop, Hally recalls his memories from the "old...

Latest answer posted May 2, 2016 6:41 pm UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

As well as seeing it as an escape from his humdrum, impoverished existence, Sam looks upon ballroom dancing as a metaphor for a better, more harmonious world. As he tells Hally, with ballroom...

Latest answer posted October 7, 2019 1:12 pm UTC

1 educator answer

"MASTER HAROLD" . . . and the Boys

That's an interesting question because Hally's actual father does not have a speaking part in the play. It's also tough to fully understand what kind of father Hally's dad actually is because the...

Latest answer posted August 18, 2016 2:11 pm UTC

1 educator answer

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