Marbury v. Madison and the Marshall Court

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Marbury v. Madison and the Marshall Court Questions and Answers

Marbury v. Madison and the Marshall Court

In Marbury v. Madison (1803), the Supreme Court under Chief Justice John Marshall ruled that Thomas Jefferson had been wrong in refusing to seat William Marbury as a justice of the peace (Jefferson...

Latest answer posted February 5, 2017 3:09 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Marbury v. Madison and the Marshall Court

The ruling in the Supreme Court case of Marbury v Madison enhanced the system of checks and balances. The writers of the Constitution were very concerned that the government would have too much...

Latest answer posted December 14, 2015 3:05 am UTC

3 educator answers

Marbury v. Madison and the Marshall Court

In establishing the principle of judicial review the landmark case of Marbury v Madison made the United States Supreme Court a major player in the American system of government. Prior to this case,...

Latest answer posted December 5, 2019 6:03 am UTC

4 educator answers

Marbury v. Madison and the Marshall Court

Marbury v. Madison is significant because it established judicial review. After President John Adams lost his reelection bid to Thomas Jefferson, Adams appointed a number of Federalist judges in...

Latest answer posted December 14, 2019 7:19 pm UTC

8 educator answers

Marbury v. Madison and the Marshall Court

John Marshall was one of the Federalist "Midnight Judges" appointed at the last minute by John Adams in an expanded judicial system, mainly to frustrate and block incoming Thomas Jefferson from...

Latest answer posted June 21, 2010 3:39 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Marbury v. Madison and the Marshall Court

The long-term consequences of the Supreme Court’s 1803 decision in Marbury v. Madison were profound. In short, the decision, unanimous and penned by Chief Justice John Marshall, reaffirmed the...

Latest answer posted December 22, 2017 1:03 am UTC

2 educator answers

Marbury v. Madison and the Marshall Court

Marbury v. Madison certainly is the case that established the Supreme Court’s power and legitimacy as a co-equal branch of government, on a par with Congress and the President. But there are also...

Latest answer posted November 22, 2014 3:58 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Marbury v. Madison and the Marshall Court

Madison's main argument was that, because he hadn't delivered notice of Marbury's commission in time, his appointment wasn't valid. That being the case, the new President, Thomas Jefferson, could...

Latest answer posted August 10, 2019 7:55 am UTC

1 educator answer

Marbury v. Madison and the Marshall Court

Under Chief Justice Marshall, the US Supreme Court became a major player in American government for the first time, far more important than anyone could possibly have envisaged. After arrogating to...

Latest answer posted October 14, 2017 9:58 am UTC

3 educator answers

Marbury v. Madison and the Marshall Court

The most significant principles had to do with the checks and balances system of government. They divided the government into three branches. The judicial, executive and legislative branch all...

Latest answer posted August 15, 2011 9:10 am UTC

6 educator answers

Marbury v. Madison and the Marshall Court

The answer to this is D. All of the statements A through C are true, thus making D the best answer. This case arose when the outgoing President Adams made a number of “midnight appointments” to...

Latest answer posted October 14, 2012 11:47 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Marbury v. Madison and the Marshall Court

The other answers here discuss the immediate issues that led to this pivotal Supreme Court case. Therefore, I will discuss some of the deeper background issues that also contributed to it. This all...

Latest answer posted November 19, 2019 6:50 am UTC

4 educator answers

Marbury v. Madison and the Marshall Court

There were several principles established by the Marshall Court. One of these principles is the concept of judicial review. This means that the courts can rule on the constitutionality of actions...

Latest answer posted January 24, 2016 2:33 am UTC

1 educator answer

Marbury v. Madison and the Marshall Court

As an arch-Federalist, Chief Justice Marshall believed that the United States should have a strong, centralized government to meet the challenges of the new nation, both internal and external. And...

Latest answer posted January 20, 2020 9:36 am UTC

3 educator answers

Marbury v. Madison and the Marshall Court

The principle that the Supreme Court established in this case was the principle of judicial review. Judicial review is the idea that the judicial branch has the right to determine if laws passed...

Latest answer posted August 14, 2012 4:04 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Marbury v. Madison and the Marshall Court

This exact question was asked back on November 4. Here's what I said then... McCulloch vs. Maryland gave the federal government the power to do more or less whatever it wanted through the "elastic...

Latest answer posted November 8, 2009 7:50 am UTC

1 educator answer

Marbury v. Madison and the Marshall Court

The issue at the heart of Marbury v. Madison is the power of the judicial branch to interpret the U.S. Constitution. This case was decided a mere sixteen years after the adoption of the...

Latest answer posted October 3, 2012 6:49 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Marbury v. Madison and the Marshall Court

The case arose out of the fierce political rivalry between the outgoing Federalist Administration and its Democratic-Republican opponents. Thomas Jefferson, the Democratic-Republican candidate for...

Latest answer posted November 29, 2018 10:14 am UTC

1 educator answer

Marbury v. Madison and the Marshall Court

Marbury v. Madison (1803) was a very important Supreme Court case. In it, the Court decided that Section 13 of the Judiciary Act of 1789 was unconstitutional. The case grew out of the development...

Latest answer posted February 17, 2019 12:11 am UTC

2 educator answers

Marbury v. Madison and the Marshall Court

To a great extent, the claim of "judicial activism" might be be seen in relative contexts. For example, Marshall might not be necessarily seen as much as an activist as Chief Justices such as...

Latest answer posted March 22, 2012 7:27 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Marbury v. Madison and the Marshall Court

I believe that the assertion of the Supreme Court as the sole interpreter of the Constitution becomes the lasting significance of the case. The idea that no other branch except the judicial can...

Latest answer posted April 21, 2010 7:36 pm UTC

5 educator answers

Marbury v. Madison and the Marshall Court

I think that Jefferson's presidency was impacted by John Marshall's landmark decision in a couple of ways. The first was that Jefferson had to acquiesce to the fact that he could not simply assume...

Latest answer posted October 21, 2012 1:16 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Marbury v. Madison and the Marshall Court

William Marbury was appointed as a justice of the peace by Pres. John Adams and his appointment was approved by the Senate, but the actual commission confirming his appointment was not delivered...

Latest answer posted November 7, 2011 2:55 am UTC

1 educator answer

Marbury v. Madison and the Marshall Court

The issue was whether or not the court had to approve appointments made in the last days of John Adams presidency, as Marbury and the others claimed. The court ruled in favor of Madison, and, in...

Latest answer posted October 26, 2012 1:49 am UTC

1 educator answer

Marbury v. Madison and the Marshall Court

Let us try to simplify what is really a very poignant moment in the political history of the United States. The importance of the case Marbury vs. Madison is the pivotal case which precluded the...

Latest answer posted April 7, 2012 11:30 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Marbury v. Madison and the Marshall Court

Justice Marshall identified the need for judicial authority to review the constitutionality of acts of Congress by making several determinations. The first determination is that the Constitution is...

Latest answer posted April 8, 2019 12:21 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Marbury v. Madison and the Marshall Court

Let us look at three rulings by the Marshall Court that increased federal authority. McCulloch v. Maryland. This case greatly expanded the power of Congress by interpreting the Constitution...

Latest answer posted October 24, 2012 3:10 am UTC

1 educator answer

Marbury v. Madison and the Marshall Court

Given these two choices, the latter choice is the more accurate one. First of all, it is very hard to say that the Supreme Court usurped power. In order for power to be usurped, it must belong to...

Latest answer posted March 6, 2013 11:48 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Marbury v. Madison and the Marshall Court

The brief answer to this is simply “yes.” This is why Marbury v. Madison is an important case. It did set a precedent because it was the first time that the Supreme Court ever invalidated a law...

Latest answer posted February 4, 2013 2:19 am UTC

1 educator answer

Marbury v. Madison and the Marshall Court

The landmark ruling in Marbury v Madison (1803) established the principle that the Supreme Court has the right to strike down legislative acts for being unconstitutional. Prior to the case, the...

Latest answer posted April 24, 2019 11:20 am UTC

2 educator answers

Marbury v. Madison and the Marshall Court

The landmark Supreme Court case of Marbury v Madison (1803) established the Supreme Court as a major player in the American political system. Prior to the case, the Supreme Court had been very much...

Latest answer posted November 6, 2019 8:32 am UTC

1 educator answer

Marbury v. Madison and the Marshall Court

This statement is true. This case did establish a very important precedent in the American legal system. Before this case, it was not at all clear as to who would have the power to interpret the...

Latest answer posted May 26, 2012 5:57 pm UTC

1 educator answer