The Man Who Was Almost a Man Questions and Answers

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

Dave Saunders wants a gun in “The Man Who Was Almost a Man” by Richard Wright. This teenager finds himself struggling to be a man; however, his immaturity in thinking and no understanding of...

Latest answer posted June 17, 2013 6:00 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

The main conflict in the story occurs within the main character, Dave, as he struggles to prove that he is an adult worth respecting and admiring. That conflict is definitely internal, and is the...

Latest answer posted February 16, 2010 2:03 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

In Richard Wright's short story "The Man Who was Almost a Man" or "Almos' a Man," the main character Dave longs to overcome his poverty stricken life as a sharecropper's son in the rural south...

Latest answer posted April 12, 2016 5:56 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

The short story "The Man Who Was Almost a Man" by Richard Wright tells of a 16-year-old black boy who is desperate to assert his manhood. He comes to the conclusion that owning a gun will give him...

Latest answer posted May 2, 2019 2:56 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

The mule represents manhood because manhood often symbolizes a crossroads in life, and making the right decision "makes you a man". Jenny, who Dave has shot, represents that crossroads for Dave....

Latest answer posted February 13, 2009 3:20 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

In the story Dave demonstrates that he is just a 17 year old "boy" and not ready to make the rite of passage into manhood. He felt that a gun was a status symbol to be a man and if he...

Latest answer posted October 18, 2007 1:02 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

The short story "The Man Who Was Almost a Man" by Richard Wright tells of a 16-year-old African American boy named Dave who wants to buy a gun. He thinks that if he owns a gun he will somehow be...

Latest answer posted October 3, 2019 12:51 am UTC

4 educator answers

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

Dave is a young, powerless black man who wants to be treated like an adult. He is not taken seriously as a man because he hasn't proven himself to his family and employer. He works on a...

Latest answer posted October 16, 2015 8:06 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

For the most part, Wright's narrative technique and general style are relatively traditional. He does not depict events in a surreal fashion, nor does he employ stream-of-consciousness or...

Latest answer posted December 25, 2019 6:44 am UTC

4 educator answers

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

The third person omniscient point of view (POV) uses an all-knowing narrator. This POV gives the reader an honest and objective look at the thoughts and feelings of all the characters in the story....

Latest answer posted November 7, 2011 11:36 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

The main character in Richard Wright’s story “The Man Who Was Almost a Man” struggles to know who he actually is. Dave Saunders’ identity crisis comes from living in a small southern town where he...

Latest answer posted August 5, 2013 6:53 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

"The Man Who Was Almost a Man" explores the intersection of race and masculinity. It is the story of an adolescent who struggles to find his place in a world full of limitations. Dave desperately...

Latest answer posted November 19, 2018 10:36 am UTC

2 educator answers

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

Setting is most important in this story because the story could not take place in a different kind of setting. The setting itself is indicative of the themes and symbolism in the story. It takes...

Latest answer posted September 24, 2010 4:48 am UTC

4 educator answers

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

I wasn't aware that there was any moral courage displayed in the story. The main character, Dave, is at heart a petulant and cowardly boy that shows no moral courage whatsoever. Take for example...

Latest answer posted February 15, 2009 12:28 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

Dave's mother allows him to buy the gun on the condition that he takes it straight home to her. However, Dave doesn't go straight home but stays out late, returning only when he thinks his mother...

Latest answer posted May 17, 2019 4:51 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

Finding what's opposite is much easier than finding what is the same between these two titles. For one thing, "The Man Who Was Almost a Man" is a short story (the projected novel version was never...

Latest answer posted June 5, 2013 7:01 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

The answer is more than likely no. Young Dave Saunders is seventeen years old; his whole family lives and works on Jim Hawkin's plantation. When Dave asks to borrow Old Joe's gun catalog, Joe is...

Latest answer posted September 4, 2015 5:19 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

Dave wants to be seen and treated as a man; when others laugh at him, the laughter serves as a harsh reminder of Dave's place as a "boy" in his family, in the fields he works, and in his society....

Latest answer posted February 13, 2020 6:04 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

This all depends on what you think the central conflict is. I'll run through a couple different options for you. If you feel that central conflict is Dave's accidental shooting of the mule, that...

Latest answer posted May 25, 2010 6:26 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

An adult takes responsibility for his actions; he has the maturity, responsibility, wisdom, and respect necessary to own a gun, which is a weighty responsibility. Dave does not demonstrate any of...

Latest answer posted February 23, 2009 9:56 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

Dave's remark indicates the context of this novel and the widespread problems of racism that African-Americans faced during the first few decades of teh twentieth century. Let us remember that...

Latest answer posted February 6, 2012 1:24 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

In a word, no. The clue can be found in the title, "almost." There is much evidence that Dave has not reached maturity. For example, he is not allowed to manage his earnings, he cannot...

Latest answer posted February 5, 2008 11:45 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

The climax occurs at the point in the story when Dave inadvertently shoots Jenny, the mule; the denouement of the story occurs as Dave jumps onto the train car. Richard Wright's story "The Man Who...

Latest answer posted January 28, 2016 8:17 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

The train can symbolize many different things, depending on what you are taking away from the story. The story is essentially about a kid who wants respect from others, and goes about it in all of...

Latest answer posted May 25, 2010 6:12 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

Wright's use of dialect helps the reader to put himself there; this literary tool, in addition to sensory and setting description, makes the entire scenario more believable. Any way the writer can...

Latest answer posted November 9, 2008 2:12 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

Dave feels that others don't respect him and look down on him because he is young, poor, and has not yet made his place in the world. He has a job, but his parents keep his wages. He feels put down...

Latest answer posted November 21, 2013 7:00 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

Wright's consistent thesis throughout his writing is that society is responsible for the monsters they piece together. Dave is emasculated and disempowered by everyone he encounters: his...

Latest answer posted April 19, 2008 8:03 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

One literary element that invites attention is the setting. It’s morning, and Dave is in bed. The morning time tends to carry some symbolic power. Typically, morning represents a peaceful time or a...

Latest answer posted November 18, 2020 3:48 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

Seventeen-year-old Dave desperately wants respect and power. He wants his parents and coworkers in the field to see him as a man, and in his eyes, owning a gun will allow him to get their respect...

Latest answer posted September 15, 2010 11:11 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

The ending of the story “The Man Who was Almost a Man” is very empowering. After living his life being pushed around and bullied because of his race, Dave has decided to flee from the southern farm...

Latest answer posted July 13, 2019 6:07 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

The gun is the catalyst that reveals the true nature of his relationship with these characters. His acquisition of the gun reveals that:1. He is willing to lie to his mother and father in order...

Latest answer posted November 16, 2008 1:04 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

One of Wright's most interesting premises of the story is how the concept of masculinity is one that is socially driven. Part of the reason that Dave wishes so much to be seen as a "man" is...

Latest answer posted November 1, 2012 1:14 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

Yes, the story still seems relevant today. It would probably have seemed relevant thousands of years ago, and I suspect that it will remain relevant as long as human beings (young men in...

Latest answer posted September 6, 2011 2:38 pm UTC

7 educator answers

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

Bill, the father of Dave, symbolizes the impotent position of the black male in both the family structure and in society. Although as an adult man, Bill is physically powerful, he has little...

Latest answer posted March 9, 2009 1:58 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

Perhaps a comparison and commentary on how society determines when a young person is "mature" would suffice. The idea of a 17-year-old boy purchasing a gun (legally) is unthinkable today, but...

Latest answer posted October 7, 2009 3:12 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

Dave reacts by crying when his father violently shakes him and demands that he tell the truth. From the text, we can see that Dave is visibly distressed by the murmurs of condemnation from the...

Latest answer posted August 22, 2018 8:44 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

There is a permanent sense of loss that is intrinsic to both Dave and Bigger. Wright constructs both protagonists with an understanding that the potential for social change rests with illuminating...

Latest answer posted January 19, 2013 12:49 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

Dave wants to be treated as a man, but lacks most means necessary to be treated as one. He is uneducated and immature. He lives a life subject to his parents’ whims. He views owning a firearm as a...

Latest answer posted April 22, 2010 10:33 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

Dave is lacking in self-worth. He focuses on the need for a gun to make him feel powerful and in control. Dave believes he needs the gun to feel like a man. He is also impulsive, as well.Dave does...

Latest answer posted January 22, 2008 6:36 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

The whole story is told in third person omniscient, meaning that the narrator can see into Dave's thoughts. What you think is first person is actually interior monologue, a narrative device where a...

Latest answer posted November 24, 2010 6:45 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

In The Man Who Was Almost a Man, consider Dave’s original goals for buying the pistol and what ultimately happens. His aspirations to become a man backfire on him terribly, resulting in him...

Latest answer posted April 22, 2010 10:26 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

Originally, Dave stops by the store to pick up a catalog that has revolvers in it; he wants to look at them. As he does, he imagines how great it would be to have one, how it would make him more...

Latest answer posted January 6, 2009 10:41 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

Achieving adulthood or manhood in America is all about working hard to earn a good living and provide for oneself and one's family, no matter what your circumstances were when you started. It is...

Latest answer posted May 25, 2010 1:42 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

One theme in the story is overcoming oppression. Since the Civil War, even with the abolishment of slavery, there was still oppression for the black man and he couldn't own property or sell his...

Latest answer posted October 18, 2007 1:49 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

Here are some tips to help you identify Point of View: 1) Omniscient narrators are "all knowing." They can comment on the thoughts, feelings, and actions of ALL of the characters in a work. 2) A...

Latest answer posted February 20, 2012 10:43 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

Everything about Dave's environment speaks to the oppression and poverty in which he, his family, his co-workers and peers must live. Wright engages all of our senses in order to make the reader...

Latest answer posted April 20, 2008 11:54 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

Dave Sanders is a young kid who desperately wants to prove that he is deserving of respect and fear. He is picked on a lot, and wants to be able to stand up for himself and be the one in the...

Latest answer posted May 25, 2010 6:20 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

They were ordinary people trying to make a living and take care of their children despite poverty and injustice. Dave's parents are sharecroppers. Instead of paying a monthly rent to their...

Latest answer posted May 5, 2008 8:38 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

Commercial works must appeal to large, massive audiences, and so tend to have themes, characters, situations and conflicts that are more general, universal and relatable. "The Man Who Was Almost a...

Latest answer posted May 25, 2010 6:04 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Man Who Was Almost a Man

It can be seen that way. There are a few factors to take into consideration, though. He uses violence to express his frustration, and the fact that he is a killer loses him sympathy. However,...

Latest answer posted November 8, 2007 6:54 pm UTC

1 educator answer

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