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  • Macbeth
    To answer this question, take a look at Act I, Scene II of Macbeth. In this scene, King Duncan listens to an eyewitness account of the battle against the rebels. In particular, he listens to the...

    Asked by kheterpalkhushi on via iOS

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    Banquo is already suspicious of the effects he fears the prophecies of the Weird Sisters have had on Macbeth. Remember, he was there when they told Macbeth that he would be king. When Duncan is...

    Asked by user8612402 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    The problem with King Duncan, as Shakespeare presents him, is that he is actually too honest and trusting. He has no suspicions of Macbeth and his ambitions at all, and Duncan agrees amiably to...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    Macduff does indeed kill Macbeth in act 5, scene 8. Macbeth has developed a false sense of invincibility, having been told by the witches that no man "of woman born" can kill him, but Macduff...

    Asked by preetyjeet301 on via iOS

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    It's Act I, Scene III and Macbeth is marveling at the fact that two of the witches' prophecies have already come true: he has become both Thane of Glamis and Thane of Cawdor. Macbeth is seriously...

    Asked by preetyjeet301 on via iOS

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    Macduff is a Scottish noble who holds the title of Thane of Fife. He is one of the first to suspect Macbeth's treachery—though he does not voice his concerns, he notably declines to attend...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    Lady Macbeth is Macbeth's wife from Shakespeare's play, Macbeth. She is a very important character in the play. Like her husband, she is power hungry and willing to gain more power through devious...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    In act 3, scene 6 of Macbeth, a lord reveals to Lennox that Macduff has fled Scotland for England to rendezvous with other rebels. It is clear that both men sympathize with Macduff, as they now...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    You will find your answer in Act 1 Scene 5 of the play. After reading the letter, Lady Macbeth struggles with deep concerns. She fears that her husband won't have the courage to act purposefully....

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    In Act 5, Scene 1, 24-42 of Macbeth, one of the most apt themes would be guilt. Lady Macbeth is sleepwalking, which she does every night. As she walks, she tries to wash the symbolic blood from her...

    Asked by karansamra26 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    He betrays Lady Macbeth in the sense that he dispenses her advice and starts to act unilaterally. Lady Macbeth, more than anyone else, is responsible for her husband's rise to power; she made him...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    In act 4, scene 3 of Macbeth, Macduff is hiding out in England, having fled Macbeth's incipient tyranny in Scotland. Ross enters and tells Macduff the terrible news: his whole family has been...

    Asked by user5521532 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    There are several good quotes that could be used to help illustrate that Macbeth is a villain. Some of the best ones come near the end of the play after it has become clear to everybody that...

    Asked by user7688262 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    Act 1, scene 7 deals with Macbeth and Lady Macbeth arguing about whether they should proceed with the murder of King Duncan. While I will not write the diary entry, here are several ideas you...

    Asked by user6517942 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    At first glance, it seems that Macbeth is responsible for the gruesome events of the play. As soon as he receives the prophecies from the witches, for instance, his mind immediately begins to think...

    Asked by jaziblazer on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    Lady Macbeth could be described as having become mad or crazy from guilt. She is like a ghost, sleepwalking at night, muttering aloud to herself about washing a blood spot away. She talks about how...

    Asked by elliemarygallagher on via iOS

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    The reason Lady Macbeth encourages her husband to kill King Duncan is because she is motivated by her ambition and desire to become queen. After Lady Macbeth reads her husband's letter regarding...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    Macbeth is not simply the plaything of powerful witches. First, as we find out in act 3, the three witches who prophecy that Macbeth will become thane of Cawdor and king of Scotland are not all...

    Asked by adrianmejeritski on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    In many ways, Shakespeare's Macbeth is a study of a character gradually isolating himself on many levels. Macbeth begins the play as a respected warrior, one of King Duncan's favorites. However, as...

    Asked by johnemitchell on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    This question references one of the most powerful aspects of the story arc of Macbeth. In the first act, Lady Macbeth is ruthless, strong, and cunning. Indeed, she resolves to "unsex" herself in...

    Asked by camerondaytes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    Macbeth is saying that what happens will happen; if fate, or "chance," wants him to be king, then it will happen no matter what he does. Macbeth has seen some of the prophecies of the witches come...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    2 educator answers

  • Macbeth
    The supernatural plays a role in Macbeth primarily through the witches and their prophecies. The play opens with a scene in which the witches speak to each other about meeting Macbeth on the heath...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    I'm not sure there's really enough discussion of suicide in the play to convey a theme in regards to it. However, Malcolm, the late King Duncan's heir, announces at the very end of the play that...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    You ask a good question. If Macbeth now believes himself to be invulnerable, then why would he feel the need to kill anyone? And yet, when the second apparition tells him to be bold because no man...

    Asked by user6545947 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    Early in the play, beginning in scene two of the first act, blood is associated with military valor and honor. The sergeant approaching Duncan is described simply as "that bloody man." When the...

    Asked by chocolatecookie2023 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    What is really striking about the killing of Macduff's family is that Macbeth seems to feel very little guilt about it. When Macbeth kills Duncan, for instance, he is immediately overcome with...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    Macbeth tries to control the future by listening to and following the prophecies of the witches. After he becomes Thane of Cawdor, as they predicted he would, he believes their words that he will...

    Asked by codymwallace97 on via web

    2 educator answers

  • Macbeth
    Macbeth begins his letter to his wife, Lady Macbeth, with a description of his encounter with the Weird Sisters. The "they" he refers to when he says, "'They met me in the day of success, and I...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    At the beginning of act 1, scene 7, Macbeth considers the myriad compelling reasons he has not to kill the king—Duncan is his friend, his king, his relative, his guest. Further, it is not as...

    Asked by mparodi99 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    When someone reads a literary text, he or she reads from a perspective that is unique. An older and more renowned text like Macbeth has been interpreted and evaluated through many different...

    Asked by bcamthi on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    If Macbeth was set in the twenty-first century, it would be a very different play. Firstly, Scotland no longer has a monarchy. This is due to the Act of Union, a piece of legislation from 1707, in...

    Asked by user9238373 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    Shakespeare presents the supernatural in Macbeth in a variety of ways. In the first scene of Act One, witches appear to not only introduce the element of the supernatural (that his Elizabethan...

    Asked by michealmin77 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    Act 1, scene 3: After the Three Witches tell Macbeth that he will be Thane of Cawdor and future king, Ross informs Macbeth that he has just been awarded the title Thane of Cawdor. This intrigue...

    Asked by user1875732 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    In the extract, King Duncan is portrayed as a gracious monarch who looks after the welfare of his soldiers. When informed by his son Malcolm of the manner of the Thane of Cawdor's death, King...

    Asked by rlhlsh9 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    Macbeth does not start out as a tyrant, but he gradually becomes one over the course of the play's middle acts. When the play opens, Macbeth is an acclaimed military leader who performs valiantly...

    Asked by kiran03802 on via iOS

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    For a quote about ambition in Macbeth, take a look at Act I, Scene III. After meeting with the witches and hearing their prophecies, Macbeth is consumed by ambition. In fact, he is so consumed by...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    Macbeth is a dynamic character because he does fundamentally change over the course of the play. Initially, he is described as "brave" (1.2.18) and "valiant" (1.2.26), and he is awarded a new...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    A dynamic character is a character in a work of fiction or in a drama who undergoes some internal change. Lady Macbeth, in the play Macbeth, is such a character. In the beginning of the play, Lady...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    Most of the evidence to support the idea that Lady Macbeth feels guilty about her role in the murders comes from Act 5, scene 1: the sleepwalking scene. First, Lady Macbeth seems to be...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    At the beginning of the play, Macbeth is presented as an honorable, courageous soldier, who valiantly fights for King Duncan. Only after meeting with the Three Witches does Macbeth's ambitious...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    From the outset of the play Macbeth is ambitious; his zeal in defending king and country is praised by the injured captain, who describes the courageous and bloody killing of the traitor,...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    The character Macbeth is first presented as a good man who has won renown in battle and is loyal to his king. However, after he meets the three witches, who seemingly present a prophecy that...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    Lady Macbeth goes mad some time between the dinner party where Macbeth sees Banquo's ghost, and her sleepwalking scene. The dinner with all the lords (in act 3, scene 4) is actually the last time...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    A tragic hero is traditionally a protagonist or antagonist of noble birth with heroic qualities who is fated by some supernatural force to fail or endure extreme suffering. This suffering can...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    In Act I, Scene I of Shakespeare's Macbeth, we learn that at least two of the witches have "familiars," which are spirits that appear as animals. The first witch calls to Graymalkin, a cat-like...

    Asked by aprilsmart on via iOS

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    The following guidelines will focus on the most important themes in the play and provide relevant quotes accompanied by a discussion to illustrate their significance. Stage directions and their...

    Asked by peace619 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    Because it is a drama of such a hallucinatory intensity, Shakespeare's Macbeth has been called a tragedy of the imagination (Harold Bloom). By his own admission, Macbeth's thoughts and imaginings...

    Asked by deleondulce143 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    You should start your essay with a strong thesis statement in which you express your sentiment on the topic. It is also essential that the statement makes clear what the focus of your essay will be...

    Asked by user9429186 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    The memorable Three Weird Sisters in Shakespeare's Macbeth perform a significant role throughout the play by manipulating Macbeth to make rash decisions which lead to his tragic downfall. In the...

    Asked by hstuck74 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Macbeth
    In Act Two, Scene 3, Shakespeare offers the audience much needed comic relief by introducing the intoxicated Porter who makes several witty, yet significant remarks during the scene. The Porter...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

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