Lycidas Questions and Answers

Lycidas

"Lycidas" is an elegy in that it is a poem that laments its subject's death. And it's a pastoral elegy in that it's set among an idealized rural landscape full of nymphs, muses, and sundry other...

Latest answer posted July 6, 2019, 3:14 pm (UTC)

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Lycidas

The poem is an elegy to Milton's friend Edward King, who drowned while young. It is also a pastoral elegy, placed in a rural setting. In it, King is envisaged as having been a shepherd living in...

Latest answer posted February 24, 2019, 2:57 pm (UTC)

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Lycidas

The pastoral elements in Milton's "Lycidas" are immediately obvious, while the religious elements are often disguised. On the most basic level, "Lycidas" is a pastoral elegy, complete with...

Latest answer posted May 27, 2021, 9:00 pm (UTC)

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Lycidas

This famous pastoral elegy was written in response to the death of a friend of Milton's, Edward King, who drowned in 1637, as the introduction to this poem indicates. In a sense, this pastoral...

Latest answer posted July 1, 2013, 6:46 am (UTC)

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Lycidas

Literary classicism refers to a style of writing that consciously follows the classical texts—specifically ancient Greek and Roman literature and philosophy. Literary classicism in Europe was part...

Latest answer posted October 23, 2019, 9:29 am (UTC)

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Lycidas

There have been many guesses made about the meaning of the "Two-handed engine" in Milton's "Lycidas." It seems likely that some analysts have looked too far for the answer and that it might be...

Latest answer posted May 24, 2015, 11:16 pm (UTC)

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Lycidas

Lycidas has been tragically drowned at sea. In that sense, nature is responsible for his death. Yet the waves that sent the young swain to his untimely demise are utterly indifferent to human...

Latest answer posted May 8, 2020, 5:13 pm (UTC)

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Lycidas

In his pastoral elegy titled “Lycidas,” John Milton explores both pagan and Christian notions of fame, ultimately advocating the latter as superior to the former. The mere fact that Milton writes a...

Latest answer posted October 10, 2011, 6:36 am (UTC)

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Lycidas

In the opening lines of Milton's "Lycidas," the speaker declares, "Yet once more, O ye laurels, and once more / Ye myrtles brown." The laurel leaves are symbolic of poetic accomplishment. This is...

Latest answer posted August 12, 2019, 10:38 pm (UTC)

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Lycidas

John Milton in the poem, "Lycidas," is lamenting the loss of a friend (Edward King, a classmate) who drowned. Milton is considered the second most important English poet. With all those who had...

Latest answer posted May 2, 2011, 1:27 am (UTC)

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Lycidas

It is absolutely clear that this poem is, whilst a very moving lament for a dead friend, a poem of much greater significance. Milton uses the occasion of his friend's death to raise much wider and...

Latest answer posted June 28, 2013, 9:06 am (UTC)

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Lycidas

In all his poetry, Milton leans toward the "meta." Throughout his work, we see him thinking about his role as a poet, as an inspirational voice and as one who seeks to take his place among the most...

Latest answer posted July 16, 2019, 10:01 pm (UTC)

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Lycidas

Edward King, the young fellow student at Cambridge University whose untimely death is lamented in John Milton’s elegy “Lycidas,” was apparently not a particularly close friend of the poet. Even if...

Latest answer posted August 11, 2011, 11:49 am (UTC)

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Lycidas

A general overview of the consensus of critical opinion, which seems to be rather uniform, is that John Milton's pastoral elegy Lycidas is a masterpiece for Milton and the most masterful example of...

Latest answer posted April 2, 2010, 7:51 am (UTC)

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Lycidas

Pastoral elements are important throughout John Milton’s poem titled “Lycidas,” but the combination of pastoral and religious elements becomes especially important beginning in line 76. In the...

Latest answer posted August 11, 2011, 12:27 pm (UTC)

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Lycidas

By the time John Milton composed his pastoral elegy titled “Lycidas,” English poetry had long been influenced by the Greek and Roman classics. This was especially true during the English...

Latest answer posted October 10, 2011, 7:49 am (UTC)

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Lycidas

In his famous pastoral elegy titled “Lycidas,” as in so many of this other works, John Milton treats the problem of death in Christian terms. The end of life on earth is merely the beginning of a...

Latest answer posted October 10, 2011, 7:08 am (UTC)

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Lycidas

The essential characteristics of the elegy, which are: invoke the Muse express the shepherd's (or poet's) grief praise the dead inveigh against death tell the affects of death on a personified...

Latest answer posted April 2, 2010, 12:18 pm (UTC)

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Lycidas

"Lycidas" starts off as a lament for a dead friend, but then becomes a discussion about the nature of mortality, resulting in the understanding of how "there is always a plan." After the initial...

Latest answer posted July 29, 2009, 8:53 pm (UTC)

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Lycidas

This is very definitely a fine example of pastoral poetry through the repeated reference to nature that Milton employs throughout the poem. However, it is also important to understand how Milton...

Latest answer posted June 28, 2013, 8:58 am (UTC)

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Lycidas

The answer to this question depends very much on how you view both poems and the concerns that Milton expresses within them. Arguably, both offer a strong thematic unity in what Milton hopes to...

Latest answer posted June 28, 2013, 10:10 am (UTC)

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Lycidas

For virtually the whole of “Lycidas,” Milton presents himself in the guise of a swain or shepherd. This is indeed precisely the same guise in which he's presented his late friend Edward King, the...

Latest answer posted September 27, 2020, 2:32 pm (UTC)

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Lycidas

Pastoral verse essentially originated with the Greek poet Theocritus (ca. 275 BCE), who began the genre in part by observing and then putting to words the actions of shepherds as they guarded their...

Latest answer posted February 6, 2012, 3:20 am (UTC)

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Lycidas

Lycidas is considered to be the archetypal pastoral elegy in English; as a result, it embodies many of the characteristics of the pastoral. One of the major pastoral elements of the poem is that...

Latest answer posted November 2, 2010, 12:23 pm (UTC)

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Lycidas

[Part 3] The next two stanzas, nine and ten, return to lamenting Lycidas' death, bestowing a wealth of flowers on him and, in a final return to the Shepherd allusion, assuring that though Lycidas...

Latest answer posted April 1, 2010, 5:52 am (UTC)

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Lycidas

Milton's elegy for his friend Edward King, who drowned, shows conscious artistry rather than a spontaneous act of sorrow. A spontaneous act of sorrow would be an unthinking reaction to a death, in...

Latest answer posted July 13, 2020, 12:13 am (UTC)

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Lycidas

The pastoral elegy will often represent death and an idyllic--rustic and untouched--setting. Pastoralism creates a feeling of nostalgia in readers, even if their experience is limited, for a...

Latest answer posted April 19, 2011, 10:39 am (UTC)

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Lycidas

Please note that an answer to this question has already been posted (see link below).

Latest answer posted August 18, 2011, 2:24 pm (UTC)

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Lycidas

As James Sitar points out, the genre of Lycidas is complex. Genre encompasses the classifications of pastoral elegy and epic structures. The discussion of Milton's Lycidas having to do with "moving...

Latest answer posted April 2, 2010, 6:54 am (UTC)

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Lycidas

This is an excellent question, focusing in real detail on the actual phrasing of the poem. A key image in this line involves the reference to a “plant.” The plant image is appropriate to the...

Latest answer posted June 27, 2011, 2:57 am (UTC)

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Lycidas

This is an excellent question, focusing in real detail on the actual phrasing of the poem. The image implied by the verb “Flames” is appropriate to the poem in various ways. For instance, the...

Latest answer posted June 27, 2011, 3:10 am (UTC)

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Lycidas

It would help if we knew the full instructions for the assignment. "Lycidas" is a very sad poem. This is an example of a monody, where a poet laments a death. In this case, Mliton is sad because...

Latest answer posted October 4, 2011, 12:29 am (UTC)

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Lycidas

In John Milton's pastoral elegy Lycidas, the speaker is mourning for the title character, his best friend and fellow poet and shepherd, Lycidas, who has drowned. The speaker begins with the...

Latest answer posted August 25, 2021, 3:39 pm (UTC)

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Lycidas

Characteristics of an elegiac poem cover a broad spectrum of items. Milton's pastoral elegy Lycidas includes all the primary ones and a good number of the optional ones. Milton opens by employing...

Latest answer posted April 2, 2010, 11:09 am (UTC)

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Lycidas

This question has previously been answered and may be seen at this link: http://www.enotes.com/lycidas/q-and-a/examine-elegiac-element-miltons-lycidas-107379

Latest answer posted August 6, 2011, 11:50 am (UTC)

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Lycidas

"Lycidas" is a pastoral elegy or dirge written to honor a former classmate of Milton's at Cambridge who was drowned. The poem follows the conventions of the pastoral elegy: The speaker is a...

Latest answer posted February 15, 2012, 1:56 pm (UTC)

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Lycidas

All Milton's poetry is steeped in classical scholarship. He is sometimes accused of writing English like a dead language and, indeed, was just as comfortable writing in Latin as in English....

Latest answer posted March 31, 2020, 2:25 am (UTC)

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