Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now Questions and Answers

Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now

A, E. Housman writes about making the most of the moment in his poem “The Loveliest of Trees.” No one will live forever, so squeeze every possible minute of the enjoyment of nature. The setting of...

Latest answer posted December 17, 2012, 3:09 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now

The theme of this short, sweet nineteenth-century (1896) poem is most associated with seventeenth-century poetry. It is the theme of carpe diem, or "seize the day." The narrator first talks about...

Latest answer posted June 10, 2018, 8:45 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now

Now, of my threescore years and ten,Twenty will not come again,And take from seventy springs a score,It only leaves me fifty more. The word score means twenty. "Score" is not commonly used...

Latest answer posted July 16, 2016, 3:08 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now

This actually a very simple, sweet poem. In the first stanza, the speaker is walking in the woods in spring, at around Easter time. He sees a cherry tree in full bloom, looking beautiful. The whole...

Latest answer posted July 7, 2019, 12:38 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now

This reference is from the closing line of Houseman's poem. The premise of the poem is that this cherry blossom tree at which the speaker marvels is something beautiful and a memorable experience....

Latest answer posted July 28, 2009, 3:04 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now

In a literal sense, the poet is saying in the first two stanzas of the poem that, since he is already twenty years old, he probably has at best only about fifty more years to live. That being...

Latest answer posted July 20, 2009, 12:24 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now

In this twelve-line poem by A. E. Housman, the poet contemplates the beauty of spring and calculates how many more years he will have to enjoy its wonder. In the first stanza, he proclaims the...

Latest answer posted August 30, 2019, 4:13 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now

A. E. Housman is the poet who wrote "Loveliest of tree, the cherry now." It is clear from the opening stanza that the poet believes that springtime is the best time for the cherry tree. That is...

Latest answer posted April 30, 2015, 12:24 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now

The speaker of this poem is twenty years old. He reveals his age in the second stanza: Now, of my threescore years and ten, Twenty will not come again, And take from seventy springs a score, It...

Latest answer posted June 17, 2016, 9:08 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now

This is old-fashioned language for a cherry tree standing by the side of a road which leads into or through the woods. "Stands about" means standing on either side of, or next to. The image this...

Latest answer posted May 7, 2016, 8:33 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now

This is not exactly symbolism but personification. The poet is suggesting that the cherry tree covered with white blossoms is like a young woman wearing a white dress for Easter. A white dress...

Latest answer posted July 29, 2016, 3:04 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now

In Housman's poem, a young man of twenty enjoys the snowy white beauty of the cherry bough in bloom in spring. Yet at the same time, he laments how brief life is. Even if he lives to seventy, which...

Latest answer posted September 23, 2016, 1:02 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now

"Loveliest of Trees" is written by A.E. Housman and is a poem that both celebrates nature and has a sentiment of the importance of appreciating it while one has the chance. The first stanza reads...

Latest answer posted May 27, 2019, 12:19 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now

The speaker is twenty years old in "Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now" by A. E. Housman. This is stated when the speaker says that of his "threescore years and ten, / Twenty will not come again,"...

Latest answer posted September 28, 2019, 12:26 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now

In the first stanza of "Loveliest of Trees" by A. E. Housman, the tone the speaker adopts is reverent. Another way to express this would be to say that the author feels so awestruck by what he sees...

Latest answer posted August 15, 2019, 5:02 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now

In this poem, Housman's trademark melancholy is present in a more subdued or ambiguous form than is typical of the poems in A Shropshire Lad, but it is still the dominant mood. The lines that...

Latest answer posted November 3, 2019, 6:01 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now

In A. E. Housman’s poem “Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now,” the narrator is 20 years old at the time of narration. There is no earlier age given. There are three numbers mentioned in this poem,...

Latest answer posted December 23, 2015, 4:39 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now

The poem does not actually say the cherry tree is lovelier in one season than in another. It says it is the loveliest "of trees," that is, lovelier than the other trees. However, the poem is...

Latest answer posted May 7, 2016, 8:15 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now

The speaker in the poem is very clear that of his seventy expected years of life, he has only fifty left in which to see the cherry bough in bloom. This would make him twenty years old as he is...

Latest answer posted July 9, 2021, 3:24 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now

This poem is about the beauties of nature, represented by the cherry tree, and how the poet feels he has really not enough time to appreciate this beauty, because, like all living things, he is...

Latest answer posted June 14, 2013, 9:17 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now

It means, basically, that life is short and you will soon die so have fun and enjoy your life while you can. In this poem, Housman is talking about how it seems like life is really short. The...

Latest answer posted October 26, 2010, 12:58 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now

The philosophy underlying A. E. Housman's deceptively simple poem might be summed up as "carpe diem," or seize the day. The poem, narrated by a 20-year-old, dwells on how fleeting or ephemeral life...

Latest answer posted September 4, 2016, 7:00 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now

Housman, as throughout the poems of "A Shropshire Lad," sees life as fleeting and therefore to be enjoyed when one can do so, before it's too late. The view expressed is that of a young man who...

Latest answer posted March 18, 2019, 3:04 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now

In Housman's poem, nature is presented as lovely. The speaker wanders through the woodlands in early spring and is enchanted by sight of blossoming cherry boughs. Every bit of imagery he uses to...

Latest answer posted July 28, 2019, 12:40 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now

The speaker says that "fifty springs are little room" to watch "things in bloom" in spring. The "things" he talks about in particular are the cherry trees, which burst into blossom in early...

Latest answer posted August 3, 2021, 11:26 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now

"A Shropshire Lad 2: Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now" is a poem by A.E. Housman. Housman was both a poet and a classical scholar. Many of his poems, including "Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry...

Latest answer posted August 1, 2019, 12:30 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now

Cherry trees have white flowers when they bloom in the springtime. This is why places like Washington, DC celebrate Cherry Blossom Festivals in the springtime. If allowed to mature, the flowers are...

Latest answer posted January 15, 2012, 10:44 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now

In A. E. Housman's poem "Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now," there are many things that we can glean about the speaker from the three short stanzas provided. To begin with, there is factual...

Latest answer posted June 18, 2021, 9:35 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now

The title of the poem says it all: the speaker finds the cherry tree to be the loveliest of trees. What he finds particularly lovely about the cherry tree is how it looks in wintertime, when its...

Latest answer posted September 26, 2019, 5:40 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now

Both poems are typical of Housman's work, brief and lyrical, with simple diction and a clear message. "When I Was One-and-Twenty" is more pessimistic in tone, commenting on the pain of unrequited...

Latest answer posted November 24, 2020, 10:07 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now

Easter is a Christian festival which celebrates the resurrection of Christ following his crucifixion. In the poem, "Loveliest of trees, the cherry now," the cherry tree enhances the glory of Easter...

Latest answer posted August 3, 2019, 7:11 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now

If you mean "by what means" is time portrayed, it is portrayed by the image of the trees and their flowers. If you are asking what time is portrayed as, it is portrayed as something that is...

Latest answer posted October 26, 2010, 1:01 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now

Much of the techniques Houseman uses in the poem concerns his playing with imagery. The opening stanza depicts a tree in full bloom with language that illuminates this such as, "the cherry" hung...

Latest answer posted August 21, 2009, 9:34 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now

I'm thinking you are referring to A.E Housman's short, but oh so sweet poem, The Loveliest of Trees, as I'm not familiar with a poem entitled "Loveliest Trees" by Eliot. And, as you have not yet...

Latest answer posted June 30, 2010, 12:32 am (UTC)

1 educator answer