The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock Questions and Answers

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

In "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock," these lines occur twice, each time as a separate stanza: In the room the women come and go Talking of Michelangelo. The literal meaning of these lines is...

Latest answer posted December 23, 2020, 10:53 am (UTC)

3 educator answers

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

Prufrock has led a pretty unfulfilling life, to say the least. He wants to lead a heroic life, but in reality, he's much too nervous, shy, and neurotic to do so. Each time he ventures out into...

Latest answer posted January 23, 2021, 11:21 am (UTC)

4 educator answers

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

As it is presented in "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock," to eat a peach is to take a risk, seize an opportunity, or live life to the full. The eponymous speaker asks toward the end of the poem,...

Latest answer posted September 7, 2020, 11:53 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

As in Eliot's The Waste Land, the modern city in “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” is a surreal place. The title character is isolated from the city in which he lives and from which he feels...

Latest answer posted September 6, 2020, 2:49 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

This statement evokes careful precision: Prufrock rations his life in slight doses, not allowing himself joy or excesses. It speaks to monotonous repetition, particularly in the context of the...

Latest answer posted December 12, 2016, 9:26 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

In the poem, the speaker, J. Alfred Prufrock, seems to be describing his desire to ask the woman he's with if she can love him, if she does love him. He points out all of his shortcomings—his...

Latest answer posted March 17, 2021, 10:45 am (UTC)

3 educator answers

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

The epigraph to “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” comes from Dante's Inferno, a work of literature that had particular resonance for T. S. Eliot throughout his life. The words are spoken by...

Latest answer posted September 7, 2020, 11:32 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

The cat offers a vivid, appealing, and highly appropriate metaphor for the fog in T. S. Eliot's “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock.” The job of a metaphor is to describe something unknown in...

Latest answer posted April 29, 2021, 12:52 am (UTC)

3 educator answers

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

J. Alfred Prufrock asks "Do I dare eat a peach?" because he is nervous about doing anything at all, even something so apparently innocuous as eating a piece of fruit. However, the peach symbolizes...

Latest answer posted September 6, 2020, 11:20 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

“The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock,” explores many complex and important ideas, but I think it would be especially interesting to discuss the theme of love, given the poem’s title. Additionally,...

Latest answer posted March 18, 2020, 8:10 am (UTC)

4 educator answers

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

As the terms imply, "ordinary speech" is the everyday language that you or I might use as we go about our daily lives. "Elevated language" sounds poetic because it uses literary devices such as...

Latest answer posted November 14, 2018, 6:25 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

Eliot's "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" is extremely complex. I'll show you one small section that seems to indicate Prufrock is getting old or is old. In the final section of the poem, the...

Latest answer posted July 7, 2010, 2:54 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

"The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" is certainly no traditional love song, but that is why the poem is so unique. It is a love song as only its titular speaker could create: neurotic, awkward,...

Latest answer posted July 11, 2020, 12:05 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

You might find it helpful, when considering this question, to ask yourself the following question: Does a life that is measured out by "coffee spoons" seem to be a life that has been exciting and...

Latest answer posted May 16, 2011, 2:26 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

Although the speaker in this poem does not identify himself by name, it is fair to assume that he is the titular J. Alfred Prufrock. Prufrock, a middle-aged man wracked by his own chronic...

Latest answer posted October 25, 2018, 11:43 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

Throughout the course of this poem, Prufrock reveals, through the stream-of-consciousness style of writing, all of his insecurities and fears about himself and his life. He cares greatly for a...

Latest answer posted April 7, 2010, 2:01 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

We might describe the tone of Eliot's well-known poem as "bitterly impassive." Opening the poem with a faux-romantic invitation to explore the contemporary imagination, Eliot compares this little...

Latest answer posted January 25, 2015, 5:28 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

The epigraph at the beginning of T. S. Eliot’s poem “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” is relevant to the rest of the poem in various ways, including the following: The epigraph comes from...

Latest answer posted September 7, 2011, 3:27 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

The "you" in this poem is ambiguous. It could be another person Prufrock is speaking to with whom he is going to the party. He could be talking to himself. He could even be inviting the reader to...

Latest answer posted April 4, 2019, 9:21 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

The six line epigraph from Dante's Inferno translates as: If I thought that my reply were given to anyone who might return to the world, this flame would stand forever still; but since never from...

Latest answer posted July 26, 2018, 10:04 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

Stream-of-consciousness writing usually involves the narrator speaking of whatever comes into their head, without any predictable or planned structure or topic. It is as if you set your thoughts...

Latest answer posted April 20, 2011, 3:57 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

Lines 15–25 of T. S. Eliot's “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” contain a delightful metaphor that compares the yellow fog and smoke of a large city to a cat. The poet begins by asserting that...

Latest answer posted May 24, 2021, 2:14 pm (UTC)

4 educator answers

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

In T. S. Eliot's poem "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock," it is the indecisive nature of the protagonist, Prufrock himself, which takes centerstage. Prufrock is the speaker in the poem, which is...

Latest answer posted December 6, 2019, 4:42 pm (UTC)

4 educator answers

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

In a word: Perplexing. Women appear in several places in the poem, both directly and indirectly. He notes that In the room the women come and go Talking of Michelangelo. In context, the women in...

Latest answer posted July 31, 2019, 8:29 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

There is no concrete answer to the question of what the name Prufrock means, nor is there any clear idea of where T. S. Eliot got the name from. The author himself said that he had no recollection...

Latest answer posted September 6, 2020, 11:45 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

Poor Prufrock—all he wants is a woman to love, but he can't muster up the courage to talk one! He's too stuck in his head, self-conscious, and awkward, and he overthinks everything. The repetition...

Latest answer posted February 21, 2020, 1:09 am (UTC)

3 educator answers

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

"The Lovesong of J. Alfred Prufrock," by T.S. Eliot, is considered a dramatic monologue. Some call the poem the "first Modernist poem." The poem is described as a "drama of literary anguish," and...

Latest answer posted April 27, 2011, 1:28 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

The protagonist of T. S. Eliot's "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" is a middle-aged man, socially awkward and somewhat shy, who is attracted to younger, beautiful women. He is very conventional...

Latest answer posted September 16, 2017, 1:49 am (UTC)

3 educator answers

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

The poem "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" by T. S. Eliot is the inner monologue of an isolated, lonely, aging, unhappy city gentleman. He goes to parties dressed in fine clothing but is afraid...

Latest answer posted December 11, 2019, 2:17 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

I have heard the mermaids singing each to each I do not think they will sing to me. Prufrock is an intelligent and well-educated man, but he suffers from a paralyzing lack of self-esteem. His...

Latest answer posted January 19, 2018, 12:55 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

One of the universal messages communicated in the poem is the idea of individual insignificance. Prufrock is a timid man who knows he is no one important in the grand scheme of life. He has "seen...

Latest answer posted April 15, 2019, 11:00 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

The guidelines of this website allow for one question a day; I rather suspect that you are sneaking in more than that. I suggest keeping to the guidelines, and submitting the second question that...

Latest answer posted April 21, 2009, 12:27 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

The loneliness of the narrator helps to underscore the loneliness portrayed in the description of the city scenes. The narrator is unsure and isolated, feeling like a bug "pinned and...

Latest answer posted April 28, 2008, 10:36 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

Prufrock lacks self-confidence. He believes that he is going to be judged harshly by others if he ventures out into society, and he imagines that they will talk about "how his hair is growing thin"...

Latest answer posted September 6, 2020, 12:53 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

"The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" is a dramatic monologue that occurs in the thoughts of the title character. Over the course of his reflections about his date (whether they take place in real...

Latest answer posted August 26, 2019, 12:09 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

At one point in "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock," Prufrock claims he should have been born as a crab or some other crustacean : I should have been a pair of ragged clawsScuttling across the...

Latest answer posted September 7, 2020, 11:53 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

J. Alfred Prufrock is afraid of a number things, perhaps most of all aging and death. Despite his repetition of the phrase "there will be time" five times in the poem, he admits that he is afraid...

Latest answer posted September 6, 2020, 11:22 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

Physically, Prufrock is described to have thin limbs and hair with a bald spot. His appearance is neat: My morning coat, my collar mounting firmly to the chin, My necktie rich and modest, but...

Latest answer posted December 14, 2016, 7:57 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

There is a slight inconsistency in T. S. Eliot's portrayal of J. Alfred Prufrock, to which Ezra Pound objected. Throughout most of the poem, it is clear what kind of man he is: timid, cautious,...

Latest answer posted September 7, 2020, 11:14 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

Starting with the first part of your question, let’s take a look at how the women are portrayed, where Prufrock encounters them, and what they say to him. In line 5 of “The Love Song of J. Alfred...

Latest answer posted January 29, 2020, 7:00 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

J. Alfred Prufrock has several problems that can be identified and discussed. His first problem might be described as a lack of energy or emotion. He compares an evening to “a patient etherized...

Latest answer posted September 7, 2020, 12:27 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

Eliot alludes to Dante's Inferno, Dante's account of his journey through Hell under the guidance of the spirit of the poet Virgil, in order to highlight the banality of Prufrock's frustration and...

Latest answer posted May 26, 2009, 2:41 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

Prufrock's main concern is that he is frittering his life away with meaningless activities while longing to do better things. He worries about the contrast between the sordid everyday world he...

Latest answer posted November 6, 2018, 3:23 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

This is one of those all too brief moments in the poem when Prufrock seems on the brink of seizing the day and abandoning himself to his carnal desires. In the quoted line above, Eliot alludes to a...

Latest answer posted July 19, 2019, 4:50 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

Stream-of-consciousness was a style of writing that matured in the early twentieth century to counteract what writers like Virginia Woolf or T.S. Eliot believed was too much emphasis on external...

Latest answer posted November 22, 2017, 12:12 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

Prufrock, the protagonist of this poem, has convinced himself that he is not a person meant to play the main role even in his own life — he is not "Prince Hamlet," but instead an "attendant lord,"...

Latest answer posted December 31, 2018, 10:21 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

All of what has been said in previous answers is correct; however, noting the stream-of-consciousness form used in this poem, the line must be taken as Prufrock's internal aside, a thought he has...

Latest answer posted July 3, 2007, 3:48 am (UTC)

4 educator answers

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

The speaker does not compare the sunset to "a patient etherised upon a table," but says: Let us go then, you and I,When the evening is spread out against the skyLike a patient etherized upon a...

Latest answer posted May 16, 2013, 10:31 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

The character in Hamlet who best fits the description Prufrock gives of himself in T. S. Eliot's poem is Polonius. It is hard to see how it could be any other character. Polonius is: "an easy tool...

Latest answer posted March 7, 2012, 2:34 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

The “overwhelming question” that Prufrock points to is never explicitly formulated. However, the question invites certain inferences and can be discussed at two different levels. First, the...

Latest answer posted September 6, 2020, 11:52 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

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