The Lottery Questions and Answers

The Lottery

The townspeople have mixed reactions to the annual lottery. Some are genuinely excited about it—the children who don't know any better think it's an opportunity to play and talk together. Some of...

Latest answer posted March 21, 2020, 8:52 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

The Lottery

The primary reason the nondescript village continues to hold the violent lottery concerns their blind adherence to tradition. Old Man Warner symbolically represents the town's strict adherence to...

Latest answer posted February 3, 2021, 2:08 pm (UTC)

4 educator answers

The Lottery

Most people derive enormous benefits from living in a community. From communities, we gain so many of our most important values and traditions. They keep us grounded and greatly facilitate the...

Latest answer posted August 22, 2020, 11:10 am (UTC)

6 educator answers

The Lottery

The main conflict of the short story is Tessie Hutchinson versus her village, which subscribes to the brutal tradition of the lottery. Tessie Hutchinson believes that Mr. Summers did not give her...

Latest answer posted June 9, 2020, 7:14 pm (UTC)

4 educator answers

The Lottery

Written three years after World War II, Jackson's "The Lottery" can be read as satirizing the high levels of conformity that existed in American society. Wars demand a higher level of social...

Latest answer posted February 14, 2021, 11:10 am (UTC)

8 educator answers

The Lottery

The setting of Shirley Jackson's short story "The Lottery" takes place in a small, nondescript town located in rural America on the morning of June 27th. Jackson describes the weather on the day of...

Latest answer posted October 1, 2019, 3:47 pm (UTC)

6 educator answers

The Lottery

Determining the climax must be considered in terms of the conflict. The conflict is brought to its highest peak at the climax, after which the conflict is resolved. When reading this story for the...

Latest answer posted December 1, 2019, 1:14 pm (UTC)

4 educator answers

The Lottery

"The Lottery" is told from the point of view of a third-person omniscient narrator who stands "above" the action, observing the scene without being part of it. It is as if they are the cameraman,...

Latest answer posted August 22, 2020, 11:54 am (UTC)

5 educator answers

The Lottery

The lottery is conducted in the town square, where the entire community gathers to participate in the savage tradition. Mr. Summers is the lottery's officiant and begins the ceremony by calling...

Latest answer posted October 16, 2020, 12:43 pm (UTC)

5 educator answers

The Lottery

This is one lottery that you would NOT want to win. The premise of this chilling story is that every year, residents of a small fictional town in New England gather in their town square to take...

Latest answer posted May 3, 2020, 1:47 pm (UTC)

8 educator answers

The Lottery

In Shirley Jackson's short story "The Lottery," the nondescript rural town holds an annual ritual at the end of each June, where the community gathers in the village square to participate in the...

Latest answer posted November 8, 2019, 6:35 pm (UTC)

4 educator answers

The Lottery

Shirley Jackson's purpose in writing "The Lottery" has confused many readers. In 1948, when the story was first published, The New Yorker (where it was first printed) did not distinguish between...

Latest answer posted April 29, 2020, 7:06 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Lottery

In the beginning of "The Lottery," the author effectively lulls the reader into a false sense of tranquility. The first words used to describe the scene are "clear and sunny." She goes on to tell...

Latest answer posted February 8, 2020, 4:28 pm (UTC)

4 educator answers

The Lottery

Check out all those beautiful and calm adjectives in the opening paragraph. The day is clear and sunny. The grass is "richly green." People gather for a lottery and hope to be home for "noon...

Latest answer posted April 25, 2020, 2:44 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Lottery

“The Lottery” is as relevant today as it was when it was first published in 1948. The theme of society versus the individual is a perennial one, not least because so many people the world over feel...

Latest answer posted August 22, 2020, 11:24 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Lottery

The main conflict of this short story is character versus society because it is society that insists upon the continuation of the lottery as a tradition, and it is this tradition—upheld by...

Latest answer posted November 13, 2019, 12:40 pm (UTC)

4 educator answers

The Lottery

One bit of irony is Tessie Hutchinson's arrival to the lottery. Arriving a bit late, she jokes with Mrs. Delacroix, telling her that she "clean forgot what day it was." This indicates that the...

Latest answer posted March 20, 2020, 6:27 pm (UTC)

5 educator answers

The Lottery

Jackson's work examines the issues such as human cruelty, social sanctioning of violence, as well as marginalization leading to victimization. These themes encompass specific traditions,...

Latest answer posted July 16, 2013, 12:45 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Lottery

Every year, the citizens of the little village in Shirley Jackson's short story "The Lottery" hold a lottery. Each head of the family draws a slip of paper. Each member of the family with a mark on...

Latest answer posted August 21, 2020, 2:03 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Lottery

In Shirley Jackson's short story "The Lottery," she creates tension and builds suspense by foreshadowing the horrific nature of the annual ritual as the reader anxiously anticipates the grim...

Latest answer posted December 28, 2020, 2:09 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Lottery

The theme, or central idea, of "The Lottery" is the need to examine the traditions we follow and to abandon or radically modify those that are harmful. We shouldn't stick to a tradition, the story...

Latest answer posted November 11, 2019, 2:29 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

The Lottery

In "The Lottery," Jackson says that the black box represents tradition, hence the villagers' reluctance to replace it, despite its shabbiness. The box also implicitly symbolizes death. This...

Latest answer posted February 15, 2020, 8:27 am (UTC)

5 educator answers

The Lottery

Shirley Jackson's attitude towards the brutal, uncivilized tradition of the lottery in the small New England village is incriminating and negative. In the short story, Jackson depicts the citizens...

Latest answer posted January 19, 2018, 1:06 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Lottery

The lottery could really represent any tradition or practice that now seems outdated, meaningless, or even inhumane. The story conveys just how important it is to keep evaluating traditions for...

Latest answer posted October 3, 2017, 11:53 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Lottery

We could also describe this as situational irony. Irony occurs when a discrepancy exists between what we expect and what actually happens, and situational irony occurs when events arise that defy...

Latest answer posted April 13, 2018, 11:27 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Lottery

Shirley Jackson intentionally leaves the original purpose of the lottery a mystery. It is important to the story that none of the characters should know why or when it started and what was its...

Latest answer posted September 16, 2015, 4:18 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Lottery

The townspeople in "The Lottery" are depicted as being entirely unremarkable: types and stereotypes one might find in any small town in America. Mr. Summers and Old Man Warner are the two clearest...

Latest answer posted April 12, 2020, 8:28 am (UTC)

3 educator answers

The Lottery

This saying is evidence of the superstition that underlies the lottery. The lottery derives from outmoded ideas that a human sacrifice appeases the gods and leads to a bountiful harvest. Even...

Latest answer posted July 26, 2018, 11:40 pm (UTC)

4 educator answers

The Lottery

"The Lottery" is written from a third-person point of view with limited scope. This objective perspective allows the reader to experience the lottery as it is happening, which allows suspense to...

Latest answer posted November 21, 2019, 2:59 pm (UTC)

6 educator answers

The Lottery

A good summary of any literary work will enable someone who has not read the story to get the gist of what happens just by reading your summary. A summary of "The Lottery" would need to include...

Latest answer posted November 8, 2020, 10:49 am (UTC)

5 educator answers

The Lottery

Mrs. Hutchinson did nothing wrong, nor was she accused of wrongdoing. Her death was not a punishment for a crime. It was a ritual sacrifice: the community believed, even though the story takes...

Latest answer posted July 15, 2019, 12:37 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

The Lottery

From her first appearance in the story, Tessie is shown to be a charismatic character. She shows up late to the lottery, but her absence doesn't go unnoticed. When she finally arrives, the crowd is...

Latest answer posted August 24, 2016, 2:31 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Lottery

Bentham, a name mentioned only once in the story, is almost certainly an allusion to Jeremy Bentham, founder of the theory of utilitarianism. Utilitarianism argues that happiness is derived from...

Latest answer posted March 22, 2021, 10:49 am (UTC)

3 educator answers

The Lottery

The point of view of a story can be identified by considering who is telling the story. Is it a person who is part of the narrative? Is it the protagonist of the story, telling the events of the...

Latest answer posted February 5, 2021, 11:38 am (UTC)

3 educator answers

The Lottery

Near the end of "The Lottery," Bill Hutchinson draws the slip with the black spot in the first round, which means that someone in his family will be stoned to death. This immediately begins to...

Latest answer posted March 24, 2016, 10:46 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Lottery

Shirley Jackson’s short story “The Lottery” was first published by The New Yorker in 1948. The magazine received an unprecedented response when it ran the short story, including many negative...

Latest answer posted August 26, 2020, 6:55 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Lottery

The famous short story "The Lottery" by Shirley Jackson begins deceptively. The author describes a beautiful day, warm and sunny, with blossoming flowers and rich green grass. Villagers gather in...

Latest answer posted April 15, 2020, 12:29 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Lottery

The 1948 short story, "The Lottery," exposes the secrets of a tight-knit society whose otherwise normal facade hides a barbaric practice that has been kept alive for generations, only because...

Latest answer posted September 1, 2017, 9:25 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

The Lottery

The shocking ending of the story is made all the more effective by Jackson's presentation of this small New England village as the epitome of normality. The story takes place on a beautiful...

Latest answer posted January 26, 2020, 7:45 am (UTC)

4 educator answers

The Lottery

In short, a long time. The continuation of the lottery is dependent on its acceptance as tradition, and this sense of tradition is well ingrained in the minds of the townspeople. The lottery has...

Latest answer posted April 6, 2020, 10:39 pm (UTC)

4 educator answers

The Lottery

There are several indications throughout the story that the ritual of the lottery has been going on for a very long time. For example, we are told that the black box, from which the names of the...

Latest answer posted February 7, 2020, 3:27 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Lottery

Here are a few examples of irony in "The Lottery": The title of the story, "The Lottery," is ironic. The word 'lottery' has a positive connotation and implies the people playing want to win. A...

Latest answer posted November 11, 2019, 9:58 pm (UTC)

6 educator answers

The Lottery

In "The Lottery," Tessie's final scream is both horrifying and ironic. After receiving the "winning" drawing that marks her as this year's sacrificial victim, she cries out that what is about to...

Latest answer posted October 10, 2019, 9:35 pm (UTC)

4 educator answers

The Lottery

When writing "The Lottery" Jackson's use of "common people" and lack of specificity in time period, location, etc is purposeful. She wanted the themes in the text to resonate and be timeless. If...

Latest answer posted February 4, 2016, 10:14 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Lottery

The central conflict, or problem, in "The Lottery" is that the people blindly accept the traditions of their ancestors without questioning whether those practices are necessary in their own...

Latest answer posted April 15, 2020, 4:10 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Lottery

Shirley Jackson examines the dangers of blindly following traditions and rituals throughout her short story "The Lottery." While Jackson is not suggesting that all traditions and rituals are...

Latest answer posted March 3, 2019, 5:18 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

The Lottery

At the beginning of "The Lottery," the mood is light. People are excited to gather together in town to play a lottery organized by Mr. Summers, who organizes all their town events. The weather is...

Latest answer posted October 17, 2019, 4:35 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

The Lottery

One thing that Jackson is saying about people in general is that behavior that is not examined in light "clear and sunny, with the fresh warmth of a full-summer day," is dehumanizing of self as...

Latest answer posted September 22, 2011, 6:31 pm (UTC)

6 educator answers

The Lottery

It is a bucolic setting of sunshine, rich green grass, and blossoming flowers that lies in contrast to an atmosphere of uneasiness in "The Lottery." This mood is generated through Shirley Jackson's...

Latest answer posted September 30, 2017, 2:58 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

The Lottery

One major difference that changes the story is that Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery,” originally published in 1948 in The New Yorker, doesn’t focus on one main character. It’s an overview of the...

Latest answer posted October 26, 2017, 5:54 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

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