Lost in the Funhouse Questions and Answers

Lost in the Funhouse

John Barth might be using parody in Lost in the Funhouse for an innumerable number of reasons. Let's try and think through some of them. Remember, parody typically means to make fun or imitate a...

Latest answer posted July 1, 2020, 2:04 pm (UTC)

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Lost in the Funhouse

"Lost in the Funhouse" by John Barth contains a number of elements that are common to postmodern literature. Perhaps the most obvious is the way that the narrator remains self-aware throughout the...

Latest answer posted April 22, 2020, 6:09 am (UTC)

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Lost in the Funhouse

Barth's story is crammed with metafictional devices from the first paragraph on. These devices are a kind of running commentary on his writing technique and on the technique of others. In the midst...

Latest answer posted March 13, 2019, 6:08 pm (UTC)

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Lost in the Funhouse

In the Author's Note, John Barth tells us that Life in the Funhouse is "neither a collection nor a selection" of short fiction. Rather, it's a “series” of “items.” Indeed, part of the fun or humor...

Latest answer posted June 30, 2020, 6:45 pm (UTC)

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Lost in the Funhouse

2. "Night Sea Journey," an imaginative allegory typical of John Barth, is the interior monologue a spermatozoan swimming toward an ovum. In typical Barthian style, there is a nesting of ideas that...

Latest answer posted October 10, 2014, 10:49 pm (UTC)

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Lost in the Funhouse

In the title story, "Lost in the Funhouse," the funhouse serves as an analogy to the way the story is constructed. We have a narrator writing a story about a young boy named Ambrose. We don't know...

Latest answer posted April 9, 2014, 2:59 pm (UTC)

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Lost in the Funhouse

What makes us laugh? The following are elements that can create humor. Incongruity: Something is out of place or goes against our expectations. Surprise: Something happens unexpectedly, out of...

Latest answer posted July 2, 2020, 1:48 am (UTC)

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Lost in the Funhouse

John Barth depicts Ambrose as a character type only to some extent. In the story, Ambrose is portrayed as a loner; he is often ignored and relegated to the margins of family life. His older brother...

Latest answer posted May 8, 2017, 7:59 pm (UTC)

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Lost in the Funhouse

For Ambrose, sex is a methaphor for language. "Sex, in fact, is the ‘‘whole point . . . Of the entire funhouse!’’ Everywhere Ambrose hears the sound of sex, ‘‘The shluppish whisper,...

Latest answer posted October 11, 2007, 9:20 am (UTC)

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Lost in the Funhouse

Certainly the story is about Ambrose. But, the story's central project is the exploration of the process of writing and the compensations of imagination. The story's constant metafictional play...

Latest answer posted September 25, 2018, 6:23 pm (UTC)

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Lost in the Funhouse

In “Lost in the Funhouse,” John Barth employs a third-person narrator who usually, but not always, presents things from Ambrose’s perspective. By using this method, Barth challenges the reader to...

Latest answer posted August 24, 2021, 5:43 am (UTC)

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