Lord of the Flies Questions and Answers

Lord of the Flies

As the previous post points out, the hunts grow to be more and more evil as time goes on. But one of the important things that emerges, in terms of evil, is the real character of Roger and this is...

Latest answer posted April 25, 2010 8:23 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Lord of the Flies

To Ralph, fire represents all the he stands for as leader: survival and rescue. This is evident in Ralph's use of fire on top of the mountain with lots of green branches and a constant watchman in...

Latest answer posted October 30, 2007 1:06 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Lord of the Flies

The movie begins with the boys in an airplane. They were being evacuated and moved out of the area. During World War II, London was devastated. Buildings were destroyed, and it makes sense that...

Latest answer posted March 20, 2009 10:02 am UTC

1 educator answer

Lord of the Flies

At this point, Jack has been successful in finally and completely dividing the boys into two tribes, his and Ralph's. The boys are now forced to decide which side they will be on as Jack openly...

Latest answer posted March 23, 2011 10:09 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Lord of the Flies

In examing one's personal response to this novel one needs to identify the central theme that runs throughout this story. The central opposition in the novel is that between the forces of...

Latest answer posted June 9, 2009 3:55 am UTC

1 educator answer

Lord of the Flies

In "Lord of the Flies," when the conch is blown, the children hear it, and they go to where it is. The conch, then is a call for all to assemble, and it represents the order of the assembled...

Latest answer posted November 2, 2009 5:31 am UTC

2 educator answers

Lord of the Flies

At first, as "a spasm of terror set him shaking," Ralph cannot grasp "the fatal unreasoning knowlege that comes to him again." He wants believe that the hunters have just had an accident in their...

Latest answer posted August 14, 2011 12:52 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Lord of the Flies

Ralph and Piggy complement each other in terms of leadership but without the other, neither would be quite so effectual. Ralph, the natural leader has a "directness" in his manner that the...

Latest answer posted October 17, 2012 6:12 am UTC

1 educator answer

Lord of the Flies

Piggy is different because he has more maturity in the area of reason. All the other boys rush into things or follow their emotions, but Piggy sees things differently and thinks through things....

Latest answer posted October 29, 2007 10:56 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Lord of the Flies

They boys want to steal the fire from Ralph's tribe so that they can properly prepare a feast. The fire is, of course, started with the use of Piggy's glasses. So Jack, Maurice, and Roger sneak...

Latest answer posted March 1, 2008 6:21 am UTC

1 educator answer

Lord of the Flies

This is a great question. The whole book can be seen from the perspective of power. At first power was accorded to Ralph as he was a natural leader. The boys followed him to organize camp and to...

Latest answer posted October 21, 2012 1:23 am UTC

1 educator answer

Lord of the Flies

There are lots of examples in the first six chapters of the how the boys are living civilization behind. Here are a few to get you started. In Chapter 4, Jack and the hunters let the fire go out...

Latest answer posted April 16, 2010 6:50 am UTC

1 educator answer

Lord of the Flies

As you say, the best is something that has never really existed. It only came into being when one of the little boys talked about it and it only continues to "exist" because it is really the boys'...

Latest answer posted January 5, 2010 2:38 am UTC

1 educator answer

Lord of the Flies

Theme is the story’s moral or message. Since Lord of the Flies is allegorical, we need to look at what lesson the story is trying to teach us. The main lesson is that without external forces...

Latest answer posted January 13, 2013 7:39 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Lord of the Flies

The shell, in my reading, represents the arbitrary structures of power and authority. It is the symbol of power, but it is only a symbol. It was pulled out of the lagoon, like any stone might be,...

Latest answer posted June 19, 2012 6:39 pm UTC

4 educator answers

Lord of the Flies

In Reply to #2: You couldn't have said it better! Golding was basically shocked that the premise of civilization and polish that generally characterizes the British washed away with the rain in...

Latest answer posted July 28, 2008 6:03 am UTC

3 educator answers

Lord of the Flies

How does Piggy's usual ability to use reason and logic fail him when he insists Simon's death was an accident? What does Jack's perception of Simon's death say about his character? How does Ralph's...

Latest answer posted July 3, 2012 7:20 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Lord of the Flies

The “littlun’s" represent various stages of innocence. Innocence has multiple meanings which most certainly can apply to the "littluns," such as freedom from sin or moral wrong; simplicity; absence...

Latest answer posted February 12, 2012 3:28 am UTC

1 educator answer

Lord of the Flies

To me, the theme of this book is fairly clear -- Golding is saying that human beings are inherently evil. He is saying that people have a natural tendency to do evil that is stronger than their...

Latest answer posted February 23, 2010 10:19 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Lord of the Flies

In William Golding's "Lord of the Flies," Ralph has been made the leader because of his golden appearance and his leadership qualities, one of which is his rationality. Therefore, he insists...

Latest answer posted July 5, 2009 1:52 am UTC

1 educator answer

Lord of the Flies

It's been a while since I read this book, but I would venture a guess that this would be the parachutist. He came from up in the air, and air surrounds the boys--as does the war, even though they...

Latest answer posted November 3, 2007 8:57 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Lord of the Flies

In the following link, the entire book is online. I searched for the word "painted" and found that 17 times from the 4th chapter until the very end of the novel. It was never used before that...

Latest answer posted April 28, 2009 1:28 am UTC

1 educator answer

Lord of the Flies

There are lots of references to Biblical views on religion, for example the island as the Garden of Eden, but I am going to focus in my response on the character of Simon. It is important to...

Latest answer posted April 27, 2009 6:07 am UTC

1 educator answer

Lord of the Flies

I have to agree with the previous poster, particularly if you look at the way Simon, arguably the most insightful member of the group of boys, eventually figures out that the "beast" is actually...

Latest answer posted April 21, 2010 2:22 am UTC

2 educator answers

Lord of the Flies

Ralph calls a meeting of the boys in chapter 5 because he sees the situation, their society on the island, beginning to fall apart. Huts aren't getting built, boys are disregarding their duties to...

Latest answer posted January 25, 2009 8:31 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Lord of the Flies

In William Golding's novel Lord of the Flies, the boys are rescued by a British naval officer just before Ralph is to be killed. Because the boys are from a British school where children wear...

Latest answer posted March 3, 2012 9:45 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Lord of the Flies

From the beginning Ralph wants an order to their new "society," which is why he wants to use the conch. It symbolizes that order, giving anyone who holds it--and only those who hold it...

Latest answer posted November 12, 2007 8:02 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Lord of the Flies

At the very beginning of the novel, Golding reveals that the boys have crash-landed on the island, after traveling a long route to escape the dangers of war in their home in England. More than...

Latest answer posted January 12, 2013 5:10 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Lord of the Flies

I'll try to help as well. In Lord of the Flies, Piggy was an intelligent yet physically weak boy who was teased and mistreated for being different than the other boys. His death at the hands of...

Latest answer posted January 11, 2010 8:05 am UTC

1 educator answer

Lord of the Flies

Ok, your questions seems to be asking to explain the plot development for this particular conflict. If so, here is how it would go:Exposition: the boys become aware of something in the woods and...

Latest answer posted November 1, 2007 12:03 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Lord of the Flies

The title of the novel is a translation of a Hebrew word, “baal-zevuv. An English word derived from the Greek word is “Beelzebub,” which can mean any of the following: Satan, chief devil, an...

Latest answer posted October 11, 2008 5:19 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Lord of the Flies

Chapter 10 is the chapter immediately following the death of Simon at the hands of the boys. Jack maintains that what they killed was not Simon, but "the beast" who came to them...

Latest answer posted October 14, 2008 9:12 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Lord of the Flies

In many ways, I would argue that the evidence points somewhat to the contrary. Rather than finding ways to directly combat Jack's superior charisma and more direct leadership style, Ralph...

Latest answer posted May 6, 2010 10:11 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Lord of the Flies

This is a great request. Here are some ideas that will help you get started. First, you can argue that the island is like the Garden of Eden. Moreover, you have boys, who are relatively unspoiled...

Latest answer posted October 21, 2012 1:49 am UTC

1 educator answer

Lord of the Flies

I'll be willing to offer some help, but I'll leave it up to you to complete the assignment. One possible question might be "How did you choose leaders?", then have each of them respond by...

Latest answer posted July 27, 2011 5:03 am UTC

1 educator answer

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