London Questions and Answers

London

In his poem "London," William Blake refers to the streets of London, and to the river, as being "charter'd." This could have several meanings: first of all, a chartered street is one that has been...

Latest answer posted February 22, 2021, 10:50 am (UTC)

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London

William Blake’s “London” presents a first person speaker remarking upon the misery of London life in a strongly emotional manner. This is an instance of the “spontaneous overflow of powerful...

Latest answer posted June 8, 2020, 2:05 am (UTC)

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London

In this short poem, Blake makes sweeping condemnations of repressive systems or institutions in a compressed way. This appears most strikingly in stanza four: Every blackning Church appalls, And...

Latest answer posted May 17, 2021, 1:03 pm (UTC)

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London

Romanticism, a literary movement that flourished in England from 1785 to 1830, had five primary characteristics. Romantic writers celebrated nature, imagination, the common man and childhood, the...

Latest answer posted May 26, 2018, 12:30 am (UTC)

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London

The rhythm, meter and rhyme scheme of this poem are almost deceptively straightforward. The poem comprises four stanzas, with the rhyme scheme: ABAB CDCD EFEF DGDG. There is some element of...

Latest answer posted February 11, 2021, 11:32 am (UTC)

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London

The tone of a poem is the emotion it communicates. The tone of Blake's poem is one of bleak and hopeless sadness at the distress he sees everywhere in London. Blake conveys this sadness at the...

Latest answer posted December 23, 2019, 2:25 pm (UTC)

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London

The "marriage hearse" appears in the last line of Blake's poem. The image is deeply ambiguous. First, it conflates two opposites. Marriage is associated with beginnings, procreation, and a kind of...

Latest answer posted June 20, 2021, 11:43 am (UTC)

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London

William Blake is playing with words with the term mark. He is using the word both as a verb and as a noun. To mark is to notice, but it can also refer to a physical mark, like a birthmark or the...

Latest answer posted June 22, 2021, 11:33 am (UTC)

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London

A more complete version of this quote is as follows: And the hapless Soldiers sigh Runs in blood down Palace walls. In general, the last line of the quote is saying that the "Palace," the...

Latest answer posted June 21, 2021, 11:20 am (UTC)

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London

The speaker says that he hears the "mind-forg'd manacles" in the cry of every man, every infant, every voice. This is our first clue that something figurative is going on here, as we would be much...

Latest answer posted June 22, 2021, 2:08 pm (UTC)

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London

William Blake published "London" in 1794 in his Songs of Experience. The French Revolution had taken place just five years earlier, and this caused lawmakers in England to pass new laws that would...

Latest answer posted June 22, 2021, 1:41 pm (UTC)

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London

How the youthful Harlots curse Blasts the new-born Infants tear And blights with plagues the Marriage hearse The meaning of these three lines seems to be this. If men consort with prostitutes...

Latest answer posted March 26, 2015, 12:15 am (UTC)

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London

We're not William Blake, of course. We can't say for sure what he's referring to when he uses the phrase "mind-forg'd manacles." However, if we look at the context of the phrase and the general...

Latest answer posted June 23, 2020, 5:47 pm (UTC)

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London

William Blake's poem, "London," presents a stark and bleak image of England's capital city. Dark and oppressive, the city is both the stage and the mechanism of indoctrination, crushing the spirit...

Latest answer posted August 18, 2015, 11:07 pm (UTC)

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London

William Blake's "London" presents the eponymous city of London as a dark, hopeless, miserable, and poverty-stricken place. The speaker references children, or "Infants," twice in the poem. He does...

Latest answer posted January 5, 2020, 10:47 am (UTC)

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London

His view of humanity in this poem is, to say the least, bleak and desperate. Blake seeks to provide a portrait of Londoners, particularly members of the lower-class, struggling to survive in the...

Latest answer posted May 12, 2016, 9:13 am (UTC)

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London

Romanticism is characterized by the glorification of nature, the celebration of the individual, and the emphasis on imagination and emotion. So, with "London" we don't see those themes overtly. But...

Latest answer posted April 5, 2016, 3:30 pm (UTC)

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London

Blake's poem is part of his collection called Songs of Innocence and of Experience. While often thought of as children's poems, their larger purpose is to articulate Blake's vision of reality, in...

Latest answer posted June 19, 2021, 12:58 pm (UTC)

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London

In the context of the whole poem, "blackning" appears to have just as much of a figurative meaning as it does a literal one, and both are connected to the chimney sweepers referenced in the...

Latest answer posted June 21, 2021, 11:58 am (UTC)

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London

William Blake's poem "London" shows how this city, the supposed center of culture, actually embodies the wasted potential of humanity. In the first stanza, the speaker notes that the streets and...

Latest answer posted July 20, 2012, 1:39 pm (UTC)

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London

In his poem about London, William Blake cries out against privilege, rank, wealth, church and establishment on behalf of the poor, the destitute and the enslaved. I think you are definitely on the...

Latest answer posted February 20, 2010, 8:17 pm (UTC)

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London

Blake's "London" present a bleak portrait of life in the capital city. The speaker notes marks of "weakness" and unhappiness in "every" face he sees as he walks the city's streets. His London is...

Latest answer posted June 20, 2021, 11:20 am (UTC)

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London

Both William Blake and William Wordsworth were first-generation Romantic poets who wrote during the French Revolution. This war caused upheaval in other parts of Europe and in Britain from 1789 to...

Latest answer posted August 12, 2018, 5:51 pm (UTC)

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London

Blake's "London" was featured in his collection Songs of Experience, a collection that was a response to his earlier collection entitled Songs of Innocence. As Songs of Experience in general...

Latest answer posted June 21, 2021, 12:27 pm (UTC)

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London

Blake, in "London," describes what he sees when he walks through the streets of London just before the turn of the nineteenth century. For context, this was while the French Revolution was...

Latest answer posted May 17, 2018, 2:14 am (UTC)

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London

I wander thro' each charter'd street, Near where the charter'd Thames does flow. And mark in every face I meet Marks of weakness, marks of woe. In every cry of every Man,In every Infants cry of...

Latest answer posted December 12, 2014, 6:43 pm (UTC)

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London

The first two lines of "London" feature repetition, a literary device Blake uses several times in this poem. The word "charter’d," meaning "mapped," is repeated, showing that the city is mapped out...

Latest answer posted July 26, 2016, 4:52 pm (UTC)

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London

This is the stanza: In every cry of every Man, In every Infants cry of fear, In every voice: in every ban, The mind-forg'd manacles I hear-- Blake is saying the world he is describing, one of...

Latest answer posted February 4, 2019, 10:07 pm (UTC)

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London

In general, a dramatic monologue is a poem in which a speaker communicates with someone other than the reader. As the term dramatic implies, the address has some theatricality or spectacle. For...

Latest answer posted June 21, 2021, 2:08 pm (UTC)

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London

In this poem, the speaker walks through London at the end of the eighteenth century and describes to the reader what he sees and hears. In the second stanza of the poem, the speaker remarks that he...

Latest answer posted June 20, 2021, 11:18 am (UTC)

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London

In “London,” William Blake laments the ubiquitous despair of late–eighteenth-century London. Ravaged by the impersonal effects of the Industrial Revolution (mechanization, rapid economic growth at...

Latest answer posted June 22, 2021, 9:36 pm (UTC)

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London

The speaker of the poem "London" shows his anger at the city of London, which represents English civilization, by focusing his attention on its negative features. The people he sees walking in the...

Latest answer posted June 19, 2021, 11:39 am (UTC)

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London

William Blake props up the state and the church as symbols of power in his poem "London." The poem depicts misery in many forms in the city of London, from orphaned children crying out to...

Latest answer posted June 21, 2021, 11:44 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

London

The lines you ask about in Blake's "London" follow: In every cry of every Man, In every Infant's cry of fear, In every voice, in every ban [public pronouncement, announcement of marriage], The...

Latest answer posted July 8, 2010, 5:11 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

London

The imagery in "London" is largely visual or auditory. This means that it conveys sensory information that one can either imagine seeing or hearing, respectively. In the second stanza, the speaker...

Latest answer posted June 20, 2021, 1:35 pm (UTC)

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London

The poem is a bitter indictment of the structures that create injustice. By naming the poem after the city and identifying the river as the Thames, he leaves no doubt that he wants the reader to...

Latest answer posted December 30, 2018, 8:48 pm (UTC)

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London

Blake presents suffering as pretty universal, at least in the city of London in this era. He implies that there is a clear sense of hopelessness that is experienced by every adult and even by every...

Latest answer posted June 19, 2021, 5:12 pm (UTC)

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London

The human suffering and despair that William Blake discusses in his poem “London” unfortunately still exist in the 21st century. Sights and sounds Blake describes parallel social problems we face...

Latest answer posted February 2, 2020, 2:39 am (UTC)

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London

In this poem, Blake criticizes religious and governmental authority. He mentions the "Harlot's curse" in the final stanza. This refers to the spread of syphilis as a venereal disease in London at...

Latest answer posted May 10, 2016, 1:06 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

London

Blake's poem "London" (1794) is perhaps his strongest condemnation of British urban society at the end of the 18thC. Because Blake was born and lived in London his entire life, he saw firsthand the...

Latest answer posted May 29, 2012, 4:13 pm (UTC)

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London

In "London," Blake is railing against what he sees as the oppressiveness of modern life. The streets of the city are "charter'd," meaning that they have been mapped. Like all other aspects of...

Latest answer posted May 14, 2018, 6:44 am (UTC)

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London

In the poem "London," the speaker says that as he walks through the city of London, he sees "in every face ... Marks of weakness, marks of woe," and hears, in "every voice," the clinking of...

Latest answer posted April 30, 2021, 7:14 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

London

There are three strong images in "London." All of them are nearly surrealistic, like scenes painted by Salvador Dali. How the Chimney-sweeper's cryEvery black'ning church appals Chimney-sweepers...

Latest answer posted January 26, 2016, 7:52 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

London

While it is possible that the poem could be about other cities, at the time of writing (1794, contained in Blake's collection Songs of Experience), London was one of the largest cities in the...

Latest answer posted February 21, 2016, 1:25 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

London

Blake's poem "London" is the antithesis of his earlier poems in "Songs of Innocence." In the earlier poems, innocent children frolic,nature is in bloom, and people are happy and loving. It is a...

Latest answer posted October 28, 2010, 11:05 am (UTC)

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London

William Blake's poem "London" follows a simple structure that allows the violence and misery of the imagery to be digested more easily. It singsong meter and rhythm and the brevity of the lines...

Latest answer posted June 22, 2021, 11:26 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

London

While both "Ozymandias" and "London" contain critiques on power, these critiques are shaped from radically different angles. Blake's focus is derived first and foremost from the perspective of the...

Latest answer posted May 27, 2021, 12:07 am (UTC)

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London

I'm going to identify three elements of style and literary devices that Blake uses in the poem, defining each, showing you evidence of each in the poem, and then analyzing its significance in the...

Latest answer posted October 24, 2015, 11:42 am (UTC)

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London

A city, company, university, or other entity is "charter'd" (chartered) when it is owned, with certain groups having rights or privileges in it. A "charter" is a paper or contract outlining the...

Latest answer posted June 19, 2021, 12:00 pm (UTC)

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London

"London," by William Blake is a Romantic poem. This is not to say that it focuses on a loving or "romantic" relationships between people who feel affection or lust for one another, but, rather,...

Latest answer posted June 19, 2021, 5:26 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

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