Logic Questions and Answers

Logic

In logic, a counterexample is simply an example that proves the conclusion made in a statement to be false. In the statement you have provided, the hypothesis is "if an animal has four legs" and...

Latest answer posted December 15, 2011, 1:40 am (UTC)

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Logic

There is no error in sentence three. The last sentence is only true, if sentences one and two are true. To put it another way, if sentence three happened, then it was the logical outcome of the...

Latest answer posted June 20, 2013, 2:01 am (UTC)

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Logic

Logical thinking is the ability for a person to make calculations, reasoned arguments, and operations which can be applied to a number of practices and phenomena in everyday experience. The...

Latest answer posted September 25, 2012, 9:06 pm (UTC)

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Logic

The main problem with trying to compare "fact" and "inference" is that it is an odd pairing. Logicians or communication theorists distinguish between "premises" and "inferences", where a premise is...

Latest answer posted August 1, 2012, 12:36 am (UTC)

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Logic

Deductive reasoning involves going from a general idea to a more specific idea. Scientific experiments, for example, often involve deductive reasoning. In this type of reasoning, one starts with a...

Latest answer posted May 25, 2016, 1:20 pm (UTC)

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Logic

Inductive reasoning is connected to the idea of leading because, in inductive reasoning, observations lead to conclusions. When we use inductive reasoning, we take facts that we have observed and...

Latest answer posted April 26, 2012, 6:56 pm (UTC)

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Logic

The most likely answer is that this is an example of A, an ad hominem attack. This is because the argument does not offer any proof of what it is saying. It just denounces the characteristics of...

Latest answer posted November 25, 2015, 4:40 am (UTC)

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Logic

How about "...as Australia is to New Zealand", because a smaller but still substantial island, a near neighbor in a "galaxy" of island nations in a specific section of a very large body of...

Latest answer posted February 24, 2012, 10:45 am (UTC)

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Logic

Chains of logic or reasoning can have two types of problems. they can be materially incorrect (have the facts wrong) or they can be logically invalid (the conclusions do not follow from the...

Latest answer posted April 4, 2012, 7:34 pm (UTC)

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Logic

Logical arguments generally take the form of an "if-then" statement or a series of such arguments. These statements have a clause that typically begins with the word "if" and a second clause that...

Latest answer posted December 15, 2011, 1:35 am (UTC)

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Logic

You got an A in physics when you bought a new car-the car caused your A. This is an example of Post hoc, ergo propter. This logical fallacy makes the assumption that because Event B follows Event...

Latest answer posted June 17, 2012, 3:19 pm (UTC)

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Logic

An inductive argument is one that starts with one specific case and tries to generalize from there. This is in contrast to a deductive argument in which a person starts with a general rule and...

Latest answer posted March 13, 2012, 8:12 am (UTC)

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Logic

This argument is valid. The fact that it is valid, however, does not necessarily mean that it is true. A syllogism (which this argument is) is valid when its conclusion must be true if both...

Latest answer posted March 7, 2016, 3:05 am (UTC)

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Logic

Decision-making, a complex mental process involving many elements—the gathering of data, the weighing of the legitimacy and validity of the information, determining if more information is needed,...

Latest answer posted May 11, 2012, 8:16 pm (UTC)

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Logic

This is a variant on what is normally framed as the paradox of the village barber who shaves all men who do not shave themselves. The paradox has historically been used as an argument for the...

Latest answer posted May 14, 2012, 4:37 am (UTC)

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Logic

Logic can do very little for us in this debate. This is because most of the major issues in this debate have to do with things that cannot be proven right or wrong through logic. This debate...

Latest answer posted August 17, 2012, 1:24 am (UTC)

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Logic

When one asks whether statements in the form "he said X" are facts or inferences, one is actually asking about two different statements, one being a claim that someone said a certain thing and the...

Latest answer posted August 1, 2012, 12:47 am (UTC)

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Logic

First, one should avoid logical fallacies in any argument or defense of a stance. When analyzing literature, the first important logical decision is to separate fact from fiction, to remind...

Latest answer posted February 5, 2016, 8:19 pm (UTC)

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Logic

Although the Greeks, as people today, used deductive reasoning informally in many different ways to apply general principles to specific circumstances, the more technical treatments of deductive...

Latest answer posted September 20, 2012, 2:31 am (UTC)

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Logic

These two avenues to logical conclusions differ in specific ways. Deductive (de: from; ductive: drawn) gets to a conclusion by moving from known data to new data: inductive (in: toward; ductive:...

Latest answer posted June 20, 2013, 1:53 am (UTC)

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Logic

Because logic deals not with facts per se, but relationships among propositions, it cannot be used to analyze simple assertions. For example, if you state "the moon is made of green cheese", you...

Latest answer posted August 17, 2012, 2:12 am (UTC)

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Logic

There are two aspects to determining whether an argument is correct. The first is called "material truth" and the second "logical validity". A statement is materially true if it corresponds with...

Latest answer posted August 17, 2012, 2:06 am (UTC)

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Logic

Logic is the process of reasoning from a known or given to a concluding truth; it is closely aligned with rhetoric, in that an argument usually is designed to convince or to sway by means of...

Latest answer posted March 16, 2013, 4:04 pm (UTC)

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Logic

There are several premises in this logical progression which could alter it in a very profound manner. There are two premises which stick out to me as being needed for this logical...

Latest answer posted September 16, 2015, 12:53 pm (UTC)

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Logic

Human reasoning works two ways, one by induction and one by deduction. Induction starts from particulars and moves to general claims and deduction starts with general principles and moves to...

Latest answer posted September 24, 2012, 1:00 am (UTC)

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Logic

The human mind builds “structures” to make sense of the information coming in though the senses. One of these is the idea of dimensions, space locators to describe or otherwise deal with the...

Latest answer posted July 17, 2013, 9:29 pm (UTC)

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Logic

The main limitation of formal logic is that it applies to matters which are either true or false, and which can be known, at least in theory, with some degree of certainty. These are not, however,...

Latest answer posted May 1, 2012, 5:21 am (UTC)

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Logic

The main part of this debate that cannot be decided by logical analysis is the part about what is and is not desirable. We can logically discuss the extent to which prayer in school would violate...

Latest answer posted March 7, 2012, 1:42 am (UTC)

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Logic

In philosophy, the term "modal" is often used to refer to modal logic. Traditional syllogistic logic focused, for the most part, on things which were certain and happened all of the time. This is...

Latest answer posted November 8, 2012, 11:49 pm (UTC)

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Logic

The Greek Philosophers did a good job of classifying and clarifying the way we use our brains. Logic is, etymologically, connected with how we use words (logos), and fallacies (falsehoods) can be...

Latest answer posted March 7, 2012, 2:55 am (UTC)

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Logic

Truth in argument has two components, material truth or accuracy (correspondence with some external state of affairs) and formal validity (correct logical relationships among parts of an argument)....

Latest answer posted May 10, 2012, 9:18 pm (UTC)

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Logic

Logical thinking is just one of the capabilities of the human mind. John Keats as part of his explanation of Romantic poetry, coined the phrase "negative capabilities" to describe the mind's...

Latest answer posted October 31, 2012, 3:37 pm (UTC)

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Logic

Imagine the statement: "I think that a racoon got into my neighbor's garbage last night." Assume I am making the statement based on the spilled garbage on her driveway, my knowledge of the behavior...

Latest answer posted October 10, 2012, 6:15 pm (UTC)

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Logic

Symbolic logic typically makes use of the lower case letters p, q, r, s, and t to represent statements. Various symbols are then used to related these symbols or statements. We want to translate a...

Latest answer posted October 17, 2013, 12:16 pm (UTC)

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Logic

To understand the answer to this, you must first understand the difference between enthymeme and syllogism. One is the full form of a categorical proposition argument while the other is a shortened...

Latest answer posted February 10, 2013, 12:02 am (UTC)

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Logic

An enthymeme is a curtailed or truncated syllogism the major or minor term of which is implied, therefore omitted. The enthymeme [has] either the major or minor premise ... left implied. (Silva...

Latest answer posted February 9, 2013, 11:15 pm (UTC)

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Logic

A deductive argument is one that takes general concepts and relates them to a specific case. For example, we know that all human beings are mammals. We know that I am a human being. Therefore,...

Latest answer posted September 28, 2012, 11:03 pm (UTC)

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Logic

In order to write arguments in the forms of modus ponens and modus tollens, it's important to understand the formal differences between the modes. The modus ponens "affirms by affirming". In other...

Latest answer posted September 9, 2012, 10:08 am (UTC)

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Logic

Inductive argument, in which you make conclusions based on some observations and then “induce” the results of other facts, is a logical tool used by science every day. The problems with your...

Latest answer posted June 4, 2012, 5:52 pm (UTC)

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Logic

A deductive argument is one that starts with general premises and moves to specific conclusion. It is generally formed by positing that something true of a class must be true of all individuals...

Latest answer posted March 13, 2012, 8:20 am (UTC)

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