Questions and Answers for Linguistics

Linguistics

What are the properties of language?  

Humans are able to communicate with each other in ways that are unique to our species because of the properties of human language. Regardless of how different human language may sound across...

Latest answer posted November 23, 2020 12:23 pm UTC

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Linguistics

Write note on language as a system of systems.

We talk about language as a "system of systems" because it consists of interdependent systems that only become fully meaningful when combined. We cannot think of spoken language without phonology,...

Latest answer posted June 26, 2019 3:49 pm UTC

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Linguistics

What is the difference between active articulators and passive articulators?

In the context of phonetics, “to articulate” means “to produce speech sounds.” “Articulators” are the parts of the mouth, tongue, and throat that we use to articulate. Exactly which articulators...

Latest answer posted June 29, 2016 4:19 am UTC

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Linguistics

What are the types of assimilation in linguistics?

Speech is not a series of separate, individual fragments. Therefore, movement of our vocal organs is influenced by the sounds preceding and following the current sound being articulated....

Latest answer posted September 9, 2019 10:53 am UTC

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Linguistics

What is the difference between a mental and physical action verb?

Actions verbs can describes two different kinds of movement: that of the physical kind, which involves movement that can be seen; and that of the mental kind, which describes movement that cannot...

Latest answer posted October 20, 2017 9:25 pm UTC

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Linguistics

What is morphology? What are morphs, allomorphs and morphemes? What's the difference between them?

Morphology is a study of words. It basically deals with word formation, examines the relationship between words, and analyzes their constituent elements. Morpheme is the smallest unit of a word,...

Latest answer posted January 25, 2016 3:50 am UTC

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Linguistics

Is linguistics a science? Please explain with examples.

Linguistics is a science. It is the scientific study of language. The term "linguistics" was first used in the mid-nineteenth century. It is an extremely broad field which encompasses grammar,...

Latest answer posted August 17, 2019 11:51 am UTC

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Linguistics

Please explain conceptual meaning and give a few examples. Examples would be appreciated.

In the field of linguistics the study of semantics pertains to the analysis of the meaning of lexical items. Within semantics there exist 7 different types of understanding of the meaning of words....

Latest answer posted December 12, 2012 7:34 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Linguistics

What are the aims and functions of morphology?

Morphology is a Greek word. Morph means “shape” or “form,” and “ology” means study. With morphology, in the context of linguistics, a person studies the shape and form of words. One of the answers...

Latest answer posted September 22, 2020 1:19 pm UTC

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Linguistics

What is the difference between a word and a morpheme ?

A word in linguistics is the smallest content that can convey meaning. A word can always stand on its own and maintain its meaning. For example the word “historical” can stand alone and has the...

Latest answer posted January 5, 2015 11:52 pm UTC

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Linguistics

Can you explain "Language as a system of systems"?

The concept of language as a system of systems is from an article by the same title, "Language as a System of Systems," by Mulder and Hervey (1975). Their work is taken from the previous work of...

Latest answer posted October 29, 2012 4:01 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Linguistics

What is the difference between morphs  and allomorphs?

In morphology, morphemes are the smallest, indivisible units of a word that have lexical and grammatical meaning. Morphs and allomorphs are the phonological manifestation of a morpheme. A morph...

Latest answer posted November 23, 2018 8:26 am UTC

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Linguistics

Mention briefly the main process of word formation in the English language .Illustrate your answer with examples.

The English language uses many processes of word formation, so probably your question refers to the main processes, plural. These include compounding, blending and the related analogy, and...

Latest answer posted September 21, 2018 6:19 pm UTC

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Linguistics

What are bases, roots and stems in English language? Please explain with examples.

Bases, stems, and roots are the main components of words, just like cells, atoms, and protons are the main components of matter. In linguistics, the words "roots" is the core of the word. It is the...

Latest answer posted January 12, 2013 10:15 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Linguistics

How does culture influence language? What would be an example of this?

Although learning and using language is inherent to every culture culture, anthropologists have debated over its magnitude, since every person’s linguistic knowledge, capabilities, and usage vary...

Latest answer posted July 8, 2019 11:57 am UTC

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Linguistics

What is a tonic syllable? 

Intonation is the rise and fall of a speaker's voice while speaking a sentence. When a speaker's voice rises at the end of the sentence, for example, it often indicates a question is being asked....

Latest answer posted June 5, 2018 5:37 pm UTC

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Linguistics

What are the factors that made English a global language?

English has become a global language for a few different reasons. First, the British Empire visited, colonized, or began many of the populations over the world. Therefore, their language impacted...

Latest answer posted June 9, 2012 2:53 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Linguistics

What is the difference between First Language (L1) and Second Language (L2)?

Typically, developing children acquire the language that is spoken and heard in their homes, making that their first language (or L1). In a home where only English is spoken and heard, English will...

Latest answer posted June 18, 2019 5:38 pm UTC

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Linguistics

What is the difference between microlinguistics and macrolinguistics, with definitions and examples?

Macrolinguistics and microlinguistics both involve the study and usage of language. While they are often interrelated concepts, they each approach the topic from a different level. Macrolinguistics...

Latest answer posted March 26, 2020 2:09 pm UTC

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Linguistics

What are the problems one faces in trying to define a speech community?

The basic problem with defining a speech community is that it is very hard to decide where such a community begins and ends. Scholars have a hard time defining speech communities because it is an...

Latest answer posted May 21, 2012 5:29 am UTC

1 educator answer

Linguistics

Problems In Defining A Speech Community

A speech community is a group that decides how language will be used. This community may be comprised of professionals familiar with language (linguistics, etymologies, etc.) that have a developed,...

Latest answer posted February 24, 2011 2:18 am UTC

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Linguistics

What are the implications of Stephen Krashen's Monitor model for the classroom?

Before I can tell you about the implications of linguist Stephen Krashen's monitor theory, I should probably tell you about his acquisition-learning theory. For Krashen, a person gains the ability...

Latest answer posted August 14, 2020 2:38 pm UTC

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Linguistics

Please define and explain and give examples for Diglossia. Diglossia (La diglossie)by Marie-Christine Hazaël-Massieux...

Diglossia is a linguistic term that is also used in sociology. Diglossia is the coexistence of language codes that are either (1) two varieties of one language or (2) two distinct languages....

Latest answer posted September 15, 2012 7:01 pm UTC

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Linguistics

Please describe completely the consonants of English.

It may be said that English consonants are phonemes that create meaning. Consider, for example, the change in meaning when the phoneme /m/ is switched with the phoneme /c/: {man} becomes {can} and...

Latest answer posted May 30, 2012 2:21 am UTC

1 educator answer

Linguistics

What is inflectional morphology and how does it differ from derivational morphology?

Morphology is an area of linguistics that focuses on words. The morpheme is the basic unit of morphology, and morphology is divided into two branches: inflectional and derivational. The other main...

Latest answer posted February 7, 2019 12:10 pm UTC

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Linguistics

Properties Of Language

Spoken or written verbal language (what we usually think of as "language"), besides such linguistic properties called "grammar" (tense, number, gender, etc.), shares the properties of all...

Latest answer posted June 20, 2016 9:01 pm UTC

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Linguistics

Langue And Parole

Ferdinand de Saussure is often cited as the founder of modern linguistics, and his work Cours de linguistique générale (1916; Course in General Linguistics, 1959) is a seminal work in the field. In...

Latest answer posted September 8, 2019 2:05 am UTC

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Linguistics

Cardinal Vowels

Cardinal vowels are a linguistic construction devised by Daniel Jones to organize a consistent vowel sound classification. The classification of vowel sounds in the cardinal organization is...

Latest answer posted March 11, 2011 12:31 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Linguistics

Discuss in detail Lamendella's Neurofunctional theory.

Lamendella's Neurofunctional theory of second language acquisition (1979) states that the acquisition of second and foreign languages is mainly the product of neural (brain-based) processes. In...

Latest answer posted October 23, 2012 5:01 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Linguistics

What is the criteria for classifying consonants?

There is one major difference used in describing the criteria for classifying consonants. To do so, one must examine the forming of both consonants and vowels. To form a vowel, the flow of air over...

Latest answer posted January 7, 2012 7:00 am UTC

1 educator answer

Linguistics

What are the differences between Phoneme, Phone and Allophone?

Speaking in phonetic terms, a phone is quite simply a speech sound. This can be absolutely any sound or gesture, and it is the broadest of these terms since its meaning does not hinge on whether or...

Latest answer posted April 7, 2019 8:08 pm UTC

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Linguistics

How or why is Universal Grammar gaining importance in the field of Linguistics?

Sophisticated brain research, like fMRI and the even more sophisticated positron emission tomography, have shown that early theories of distinctly hierarchical divisions of brain function areas,...

Latest answer posted July 5, 2012 9:12 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Linguistics

Why does language change? Give (minimum) five reasons.

Slang is a major contributor to changing languages. The word "cool" used to only refer to temperature but, thanks to youth culture, it now means that something is good. Slang words fall in and out...

Latest answer posted November 16, 2019 1:43 am UTC

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Linguistics

What is meant by "Signified" & "Signifier" in literature and linguistics?

These terms—“signifier” and “signified”-- used by Ferdinand de Saussure to discuss his theory of linguistics (actually a philosophy of epistemology—how we know things--differing from Plato’s),...

Latest answer posted April 20, 2012 8:31 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Linguistics

What are the functions of morphology in linguistics?

Morphology is the branch of linguistics that studies the formation and components of words. Words are built of morphemes, which are the smallest units of language that have meaning. Some morphemes...

Latest answer posted October 13, 2020 6:06 pm UTC

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Linguistics

What is the difference between linguistic determinism and linguistic relativity? I know that they are both part of...

The main difference between the concepts is the amount of flexibility that each conveys about human abilities. As the term suggests, “linguistic determinism” indicates that certain features within...

Latest answer posted March 18, 2020 5:40 pm UTC

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Linguistics

What is Modern English?  

The English language is divided into three historical versions, each of which is significantly different from the other to the point that it is considered its own language. The first recorded use...

Latest answer posted June 17, 2019 6:05 am UTC

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Linguistics

Discuss the relationship of Linguistics and ELT.

ELT stands for English Language Teaching. The teaching of English can be for it to be used as a second language, foreign language, international language, or for specific purposes. In the field of...

Latest answer posted October 31, 2012 11:07 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Linguistics

Discuss the variable competence model as proposed by Rod Ellis.

The Variable Competence Model proposed by Rod Ellis (1984) is divided into two categories: the process of language and the product of language. According to Ellis, the process of language is more...

Latest answer posted October 22, 2012 11:05 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Linguistics

Distinguish among phonology, syntax, and semantics, providing an example for each.

Phonology, syntax, and semantics are three important areas of study in linguistics. Phonology is all about the sounds of a language. Remember the lyrics of that old song, “You say to-mā-to; I say...

Latest answer posted July 6, 2020 2:57 pm UTC

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Linguistics

Why are some morphemes are called '' Lexical morphemes''?

Let us first explain what a morpheme actually is. A morpheme is a representative unit of grammar that cannot be broken down into smaller meaningful parts. A morpheme is to language what an atom is...

Latest answer posted November 5, 2012 11:32 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Linguistics

What is the difference between Structuralism and Functionalism in linguistics?

Structuralism refers to the idea that the components of a thing must be understood in order to fully comprehend the entirety of the thing. As this applies to linguistics, it suggests that...

Latest answer posted August 8, 2019 11:50 pm UTC

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Linguistics

Can you explain briefly the etymology of word pedantic/pedantical?

The etymology of these words (pedantic and pedantical) is a little confusing because of the forms in which they entered English from Old French. PEDANTICAL: The original form from which pedantical...

Latest answer posted March 20, 2013 11:35 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Linguistics

What are the advantages and disadvantages of studying a language synchronically rather than diachronically?  

Traditionally, all linguistic study was diachronic: all language study focused on language's change over time. For example, a predominant question asked in diachronic study is how did Old English...

Latest answer posted March 15, 2012 3:25 am UTC

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Linguistics

Explain the notion of "grammatical variation."

The idea of grammatical variation in linguistics is the idea that there can be differences in grammatical usage across populations of speakers of a given language. In other words, different people...

Latest answer posted January 9, 2012 11:28 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Linguistics

Is linguistic a science?

Linguistics is defined as "the scientific study of human language." It is not an exact science, but it could be considered a form of scientific study in a way. Linguists look at language...

Latest answer posted October 7, 2011 3:59 am UTC

1 educator answer

Linguistics

Explain the terms langue and parole given by Ferdinand de Saussure using an example.

The concept of Langue (language) and Parole (speech) was given by the Swiss linguist Ferdinand de Saussure. These terms appeared first in the book “A Course In General Linguistics” (Cours de...

Latest answer posted September 29, 2016 7:30 am UTC

1 educator answer

Linguistics

How do the unitary system and separate systems hypotheses influence bilingual language acquisition in children?

The unitary and separate systems hypotheses are two different theories about the way language is acquired by children in a bilingual household. Naturally, children who grow up hearing two languages...

Latest answer posted May 8, 2019 2:21 pm UTC

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Linguistics

What is communicative competence? Discuss its various components give more points about the topics if possible

Dell Hymes, in the year 1966, introduced the concept of Communicative competence, which in simple terms, is nothing but the potential of a language user/learner to communicate effectively or in the...

Latest answer posted September 27, 2012 5:35 am UTC

1 educator answer

Linguistics

In this context is "imagination" and " "frost" an abstract noun or concrete noun? "He wanted to be a poet by next...

In order to answer this question, it is essential to define what an abstract noun is. An abstract noun is a noun that cannot be sensed with your five senses. To make it more concrete, you cannot...

Latest answer posted December 11, 2011 4:44 am UTC

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