The Jungle Questions and Answers

The Jungle

Upton Sinclair said, “I aimed at the public’s heart, and by accident I hit it in the stomach” in his 1906 novel The Jungle. Sinclair wrote The Jungle to draw attention to the cruel conditions of...

Latest answer posted September 6, 2020 3:27 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Jungle

Upton Sinclair’s book The Jungle changed the way Americans looked at the food industry. As a result of his book, Americans no longer trusted that the food industry had the best interests of...

Latest answer posted October 6, 2017 2:45 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Jungle

Upton Sinclair was a socialist who wrote The Jungle to raise sympathy for the plight of workers being exploited by the capitalist system in the late 19th and early 20th centuries in the United...

Latest answer posted April 10, 2016 4:16 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Jungle

The main theme as laid down in Sinclair’s The Jungle is capitalism. He strives to vividly showcase the negative implications of capitalism by painting the mirage that is the American dream in...

Latest answer posted March 19, 2015 4:42 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Jungle

Sinclair uses imagery, which is description using any of the five senses, to great effect to describe the nauseating filth of the meat-packing plant. In the quote below, he also uses the figurative...

Latest answer posted October 21, 2019 7:19 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Jungle

The title of Sinclair's novel is significant because it encapsulates his theme: that unfettered capitalism has created a "dog-eat-dog" world in which people prey on each other just as animals do in...

Latest answer posted April 8, 2018 11:57 am UTC

2 educator answers

The Jungle

Two titular characters of The Jungle—Ona and Jurgis—are introduced in these opening paragraphs. The two are attending their own wedding reception in the backroom of a saloon in Chicago. It is a...

Latest answer posted July 4, 2019 11:52 am UTC

3 educator answers

The Jungle

The first two sentences in the novel that speak specifically about selection for work in the stockyards are in the second paragraph of the book's second chapter: That was why he had been picked...

Latest answer posted September 2, 2019 12:49 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Jungle

Upton Sinclair, the author of The Jungle, was a well-known socialist. In The Jungle, Sinclair is reacting to the ideas of social darwinism or the idea that those who are successful in society are...

Latest answer posted February 18, 2009 4:57 am UTC

2 educator answers

The Jungle

The Jungle is—among other things—an indictment of the meatpacking industry in the first half of the twentieth century. During this time period, the meatpacking industry was violating all sorts of...

Latest answer posted October 11, 2019 1:50 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Jungle

Both Marti and Sinclair focus on an unjust hierarchy that exists in society in their time. Marti, in Our America, is speaking of America as the entire continent—North, Central and South—while...

Latest answer posted March 10, 2019 10:05 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Jungle

A trust is any group or organization that controls supplies or commodities of some sort. There are various trusts that work with conglomerates and organizations to control and maintain the...

Latest answer posted July 17, 2019 6:36 pm UTC

3 educator answers

The Jungle

There is much figurative language in this novel. At Ona and Jurgis's wedding, for example, Ona is described wearing clothes and decorations that symbolize her innocence and purity—especially...

Latest answer posted July 13, 2019 3:46 am UTC

2 educator answers

The Jungle

We know from the text that Ona is only fifteen as the novel opens on her wedding day. Jurgis is a little harder to piece together. He has only come recently to America, and spent 25 years in the...

Latest answer posted August 13, 2018 8:04 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Jungle

One of the most significant impacts of Sinclair's The Jungle was to raise questions about the potential dangers of capitalism. Indeed, the legislative impact of Sinclair's work can be seen in the...

Latest answer posted December 20, 2015 6:13 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Jungle

One of the strengths of the book is Upton Sinclair's passionate intensity about the need for workplace and housing reforms to give people at the bottom of the social ladder a fair chance to survive...

Latest answer posted September 13, 2018 2:40 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Jungle

The Jungle, by Upton Sinclair (not Sinclair Lewis), is a novel that was intended as an indictment of American capitalism, specifically the meat industry. Sinclair follows the story of immigrants...

Latest answer posted October 14, 2018 4:20 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Jungle

In one of the most famous—not to say, gut-wrenching—episodes in The Jungle Jurgis goes on a tour of a meat-packing plant, which is supposed to open the reader's eyes to the horrors of unregulated...

Latest answer posted October 27, 2018 7:05 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Jungle

Jurgis wants to marry Ona, but he is poor and after her father dies, Ona's family also ends up poor. Jurgis hears that life is good in America, for Ona's brother Jonas tells him that a friend has...

Latest answer posted May 5, 2016 1:02 am UTC

2 educator answers

The Jungle

Reform is a critical element in Sinclair's work. Emerging from the haze of Industrialization, Sinclair's work is designed to call to action reform on many levels. Naturally, the practices of food...

Latest answer posted December 4, 2009 9:32 am UTC

2 educator answers

The Jungle

Upton Sinclair's The Jungle, which was first serialized in a socialist newspaper, became an improbable best seller. Sinclair wrote this sentimental novel exposing the ruthless exploitation of...

Latest answer posted October 16, 2017 11:40 am UTC

2 educator answers

The Jungle

The main significance of The Jungle is that it changed the way many Americans came to regard the operation of the free market economy. Most people at that time took the existing system of...

Latest answer posted March 24, 2018 10:13 am UTC

3 educator answers

The Jungle

In Chapter 14, the author describes some of the swindles the industry used on spoiled meat in graphic detail. Generally speaking, it was the "custom" that "whenever meat was so...

Latest answer posted February 12, 2008 7:31 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Jungle

We learn that there were, all told, a dozen immigrants from Lithuania: There were twelve in all in the party, five adults and six children—and Ona, who was a little of both. These include...

Latest answer posted January 9, 2020 1:36 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Jungle

The Rudkis family faces a myriad of problems when they arrive in Chicago. They immigrate to the United States from a forest village in Lithuania under the assumption they can grow rich in the land...

Latest answer posted November 17, 2019 1:50 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Jungle

Upton Sinclair wrote his seminal work, The Jungle, with the intent of highlighting class oppression and worker exploitation in the early Progressive Era. He set his story in Chicago's infamous...

Latest answer posted March 5, 2020 4:28 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Jungle

In his poem "The Hollow Men," T. S. Eliot writes, Between the idea And the reality...Falls the shadow Such is the case for the two Lithuanian families who come to America seeking opportunities...

Latest answer posted September 24, 2015 3:07 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Jungle

Sinclair's work had profound effects on both American society, as well as implications throughout the world. Writing at the zenith of American Industrialization, Sinclair depicts a fictional work...

Latest answer posted September 8, 2009 8:15 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Jungle

In the first 21 chapters of "The Jungle", Jurgis goes through more trauma than any person should ever have to deal with. He and his family move to Chicago thinking that they will live a...

Latest answer posted January 4, 2009 7:11 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Jungle

Certainly, I think that the exploitation of workers and the atmosphere in which workers like Jurgis toil resembles a "jungle." There is little sense of justice or fairness in this setting....

Latest answer posted August 23, 2010 7:45 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Jungle

Essentially, the promise that America held for immigrants like Jurgis and Ona was the reason they decide to come to "the land of opportunity." Jurgis and Ona recognize that their life in rural...

Latest answer posted March 28, 2013 12:48 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Jungle

Ironically, the author, Upton Sinclair, wanted his audience to turn to socialism as a cure for the problems he outlined in his novel. He had written about how dead rats were ground into sausage...

Latest answer posted January 10, 2009 2:45 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Jungle

In the opening of his novel, Sinclair uses a kind of ironic but sympathetic tone to suggest that the marriage between Ona and Jurgis will, despite their happiness on their wedding day, lead to...

Latest answer posted July 22, 2018 2:03 am UTC

2 educator answers

The Jungle

Packingtown is presented as the logical extension of the title that Sinclair gives to this book. It is a dog-eat-dog place, where only the fittest survive the poverty and want that characterises...

Latest answer posted March 20, 2012 3:31 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Jungle

I think that Sinclair does a great job in exploring how unchecked capitalism can lead to a sense of personal destruction and create a system where the people who are supposed to benefit from it...

Latest answer posted August 24, 2010 6:48 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Jungle

In writing The Jungle, Upton Sinclair intended to call attention to the inequalities of capitalism, especially the exploitation of workers, most of whom were European immigrants in the early...

Latest answer posted February 25, 2021 7:17 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Jungle

The title of Upton Sinclair’s novel The Jungle is appropriate to the book in a number of ways, including the following: Just as many works set in jungles involve visitors from other lands, so the...

Latest answer posted February 14, 2012 9:58 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Jungle

In The Jungle by Upton Sinclair, the wedding scene opens the novel and serves a few important functions in regard to starting the narrative. Firstly, it displays the growing "Americanization" of...

Latest answer posted March 5, 2019 5:51 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Jungle

Then as now, Chicago was a huge, sprawling metropolis. As the largest city in the Midwest, it attracted migrant workers from all over the world, as well as African-Americans from the Deep South...

Latest answer posted March 7, 2019 9:41 am UTC

2 educator answers

The Jungle

Part of the reason why Jurgis believes in the positive nature of work is that he genuinely believes in the American Dream. An essential part of this conception is the idea of the opportunity...

Latest answer posted October 19, 2009 9:53 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Jungle

Sinclair demonstrates the evils of capitalism through various descriptions which address the fundamental idea that the ideal of capitalism is one in which people end up treating others as means to...

Latest answer posted January 22, 2012 6:55 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Jungle

It is important to remember that although "The Jungle" is a novel, Upton Sinclair was a "muckraker". This form of journalism founded during the progressive movement in the...

Latest answer posted August 6, 2008 1:12 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Jungle

I think he certainly made an impression on people. His point was that greed is rampant in a capitalistic society. Businesses will do anything to make a buck, and no one cares about anyone else....

Latest answer posted July 27, 2011 3:53 am UTC

4 educator answers

The Jungle

It relates to the workplace and environment all the characters work in. In the early sections of the book, it's life in Packingtown. Although there is hope when the Lithunia family coms to...

Latest answer posted April 30, 2009 1:44 pm UTC

2 educator answers

The Jungle

Upton Sinclair makes a heart-rending case for ameliorating the suffering and exploitation of immigrants in early twentieth-century Chicago, but the verdict of history is that his argument for...

Latest answer posted April 4, 2018 12:46 am UTC

3 educator answers

The Jungle

The author accomplishes two purposes in going into detail about the wedding recounted in the first chapter. First of all, he uses the occasion to introduce and develop the personalities of the...

Latest answer posted September 17, 2008 6:55 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Jungle

In looking at figurative language in any work, the critical element is finding examples of text that means more than what is on the page. Sinclair is deliberate in his attempts when writing The...

Latest answer posted August 1, 2014 4:38 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Jungle

Upton Sinclair's The Jungle aimed to draw attention to the exploitation and suffering inflicted on the American working class. However, with that being said, the novel's most enduring legacy lay in...

Latest answer posted February 18, 2021 12:20 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Jungle

Sinclair would posit that there are several reasons why health care and other social reform initiatives are so challenging in the domain of Chicago during industrialization. The providing of...

Latest answer posted January 3, 2011 9:55 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Jungle

Unfortunately, the portrayal of the horrible conditions for workers plus the disgusting descriptions of the meat were absolutely accurate. Sinclair published the first edition of his book on his...

Latest answer posted March 23, 2012 8:32 am UTC

1 educator answer

Showing 1-50 of 107