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  • Julius Caesar
    Throughout the play, two soothsayers warn Julius Caesar to be aware of the senators who are conspiring to assassinate him on March 15th. In Act One, Scene 2, a soothsayer warns Julius Caesar to...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    Antony is portrayed as cunning and clever but also as loyal to Caesar. The first scene of act 3 is when Caesar is assassinated by the conspirators, who then learn that Antony has "fled to his...

    Asked by hamzahah4 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    "Diction" simply means the choice of words used by an author. Good choices of diction will use words appropriate to the context, or producing a certain effect. We'd normally need to identify what...

    Asked by jnqueen on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    In act 1, scene 2, the themes of love and loyalty both appear as Cassius initially inquires about Brutus's feelings toward Julius Caesar. Cassius begins to persuade Brutus to convey his true...

    Asked by laihueyling on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    In act 5, scene 3, Cassius receives word that Antony's troops have surrounded them and commands Titinius to find out whether the approaching soldiers are their allies or enemies. Cassius then asks...

    Asked by user5805402 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    Antony is diabolically clever in his speech to the crowd after Caesar's murder. After essentially promising that he will not oppose Brutus and the conspirators, he asks that he be allowed to speak....

    Asked by terrylovett97 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    As the leader of the audacious plot against Caesar, it is hard to call Cassius "fearful." He is a brave, if also conspiratorial and somewhat cynical, character. Perhaps one instance in the play...

    Asked by terrylovett97 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    That is indeed correct. Brutus is trying to justify engaging with the enemy at Philippi, as he believes that it is somehow fated to happen. But he is sorely deluded—just as he was when he allowed...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    In Act 2, Scene 4 of Julius Caesar, Portia dispatches Lucius, an errand-boy, to the Senate. At first, Lucius is confused because Portia doesn't give him a specific errand; she simply asks him to go...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    Cassius's motivations in killing Caesar are actually quite simplistic. To understand his motivations, it is important to look at two separate passages of the play. When Cassius lures Brutus into...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    To address this question it's necessary to look at the political background against which Shakespeare wrote Julius Caesar. Queen Elizabeth I had been on the throne for forty-one years. Under her...

    Asked by enotes on via web

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  • Julius Caesar
    In act 2, scene 2, Calpurnia, Caesar's wife, is plagued by nightmares. She has dark presentiments of doom, foreseeing the bloody murder of her husband. She repeatedly cries out the word "murder" in...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    Brutus undoubtedly made a huge mistake in allowing Cassius to talk him into the plot of assassinating Caesar. Cassius is motivated purely by thoughts of personal gain. Brutus, however, has a...

    Asked by nrkraye on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    It's Act III Scene II, and the conspirators have finally carried out their plan and brutally assassinated Julius Caesar. The late dictator was hugely popular among the common people of Rome. When...

    Asked by amonty54 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    Cassius is a very clever character. He knows that if he and his associates conspire against the popular and beloved Caesar, the Roman people will respond with rage and violence. However, Cassius...

    Asked by amagine on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    Cassius is a very devious and manipulative individual. He's committed to the conspiracy against Caesar but knows that it's important to have Brutus on board. Brutus has a genuine commitment to the...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    Calpurnia's dream is referenced in act 2, scene 2. It is a stormy night, full of bad omens. Calpurnia says she has never believed in omens, but she is alarmed that "horrid sights" have been...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    2 educator answers

  • Julius Caesar
    After Caesar made his way back to Rome after his triumph in several wars, some welcomed him as a champion, while others feared him for his achievements. Part of the Senate and some members of the...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    The most prominent leadership quality in Brutus is his fierce and selfless loyalty to his country. He is more loyal to the republic of Rome than to Caesar. It is for the good of Rome that he will...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    Brutus, known as the "noblest Roman of them all," is a popular politician and close friend of Julius Caesar. Throughout the play, Brutus is a conflicted, complex man who makes the difficult...

    Asked by enotes on via web

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  • Julius Caesar
    In the play, the main examples of betrayal stem from Cassius's betrayal of both Brutus and Caesar as well as Brutus's betrayal of Caesar himself. In Act 1 Scene II, Cassius betrays Caesar by...

    Asked by user5447916 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    In Act V, Cassius's tragic flaw is that he too readily accepts defeat. When his servant, Pindarus, informs Cassius that "Mark Antony is in your tents, my lord Fly, therefore, noble Cassius, fly far...

    Asked by user5447916 on via web

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  • Julius Caesar
    Shakespeare's rendition of Julius Caesar is arguably one of the most celebrated depictions of betrayal and one that has become firmly rooted in Western conceptualizations of loyalty. The play...

    Asked by user5447916 on via web

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  • Julius Caesar
    In light of Roman military ethics, it can be argued that Brutus was both courageous and honorable. We can also say that he was noble. Brutus was raised as a Stoic by his uncle, Cato the Younger,...

    Asked by user5447916 on via web

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  • Julius Caesar
    There are more differences than similarities between the characters of Brutus and Cassius. The two men are similar in being courageous warriors, distinguished Romans, and in both being opposed to...

    Asked by shaniahood23luv on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    Mark Antony was devoted to Julius Caesar. He loved him as if he were his own father. He disguises his feelings when he is meeting with the conspirators after the assassination, but when he is alone...

    Asked by kristalplex on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Othello
    You absolutely can compare Julius Caesar with Othello. The two plays are both tragedies, so they share many similarities. Both focus on tragic heroes (Brutus in Julius Caesar and Othello in...

    Asked by sweet-ely95 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    In Act 2 of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, we're introduced to some truly fantastical happenings that, according to Calphurnia, spell doom for Caesar. In Act 2, Scene 2, Calphurnia describes these...

    Asked by hommak12345 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    Cassius is a better judge of human character than Brutus, as the events in the play reveal. Brutus is an idealist. He has an honest, generous character and expects other men to be the same. When he...

    Asked by hommak12345 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    Calpurnia's dreams, which are described in Plutarch's "Life of Caesar," were probably the only valid warnings Caesar ever received. The other supernatural phenomena and omens, including the...

    Asked by user498785 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    I'm assuming the letter would be presented to Brutus before Caesar's assassination. You could mention that Brutus, as a man of the people, would act for the people, unlike Caesar, who only seems to...

    Asked by divashree001 on via web

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  • Julius Caesar
    Indirectly, yes, I do believe that Brutus is responsible for his own downfall in Julius Caesar. While it's Mark Antony who incites the Roman mob to turn against the conspirators, thus starting the...

    Asked by johnschnether2 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    Brutus' downfall is perhaps one of Shakespeare's most tragic, as it comes as a result of the qualities that also make Brutus most heroic: his deep sense of honor and nobility. Unlike the other...

    Asked by user6791292 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    Shakespeare's Julius Caesar is a depiction of the downfall first of Julius Caesar, and then of the conspirators who assassinated him, including Cassius and Brutus. Mark Antony, however, does not...

    Asked by user6791292 on via web

    2 educator answers

  • Julius Caesar
    Brutus was responsible for his own downfall because he was naïve and did not listen to advice. The main reason that Brutus was responsible for his own downfall was that he did not listen to...

    Asked by jeraldreagen on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    This is a great question. While Brutus is often considered the tragic hero of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, many readers and audiences of the play have insightfully noted that Brutus, for all his...

    Asked by vasdev07052001 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    The crowd mistakes Cinna the poet for Cinna the conspirator, which shows the Romans are whipped into a frenzy and not really paying attention to details at that point. There was a conspirator named...

    Asked by user3698970 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    Choice A is the correct answer: To ancient Romans, suicide was an honorable way to die if it helped one avoid defeat and humiliation. In Ancient Rome, suicide was considered an honorable...

    Asked by josephine913270 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    Aristotle said "A man doesn't become a hero until he can see the root of his own downfall." A tragic hero exercises flawed judgment (hamartia), caused by excessive pride or hubris, which causes his...

    Asked by kathygoeshere on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    Early in act 1, scene 2, of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, Cassius and Brutus express fear that Caesar will be made king, leading to the fall of the Roman Republic. They express their fear when, at...

    Asked by cassandrahiglesias on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    One of the main ways that Shakespeare creates sympathy for Cassius is that Brutus always ignores his advice. This leads to their destruction. When Cassius dies, Shakespeare creates sympathy for him...

    Asked by user8794416 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    There is an ominous and foreboding mood in Act II, Scene 2 of Julius Caesar. Certainly, the weather is ominous, as the thunder and lightning threaten in the heavens. Caesar himself observes, Nor...

    Asked by neymarchua on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    Readers have long noted that, despite the fact that the play is named after him, Julius Caesar is not really about Julius Caesar, and in fact focuses on the deeds of other characters. In that case,...

    Asked by enotes on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    Antony anticipates the crowd’s hostility when he tells the crowd that he did not come there to praise Caesar. Mark Antony speaks at Caesar’s funeral after Brutus. He has made the arrangement...

    Asked by obama254 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    The group of Roman lower-class citizens is ordered to disperse by the tribunes Flavius and Murellus because they are all out honoring Julius Caesar. The tribunes are members of the upper class and...

    Asked by user6284298 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    There was a lot of talking and restlessness in Shakespeare's theater before the play began, especially in the pit where the standees were often unruly. Shakespeare's opening scenes typically start...

    Asked by kidoznadroga on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    Caesar feels that no one should question his decisions, and he loses his role as leader when he is assassinated by a group of senators. Julius Caesar believed that since he was the ruler of Rome,...

    Asked by alby4444 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    Cicero is killed in Antony’s proscription. Cassius seeks out Brutus to join his conspiracy against Julius Caesar because he feels that his name will lend them legitimacy. Brutus takes the...

    Asked by daniellearaujo729 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    Antony was clearly the more effective speaker. It was his speech that drove the gathered crowd into a frenzy. At the end of his oration, the crowd had become enraged at what, he made them believe,...

    Asked by user4568977 on via web

    1 educator answer

  • Julius Caesar
    This would have to be a matter of opinion based on Shakespeare's characterizations of the three men, which were based on his reading of Plutarch's Lives of the Noble Greeks and Romans, written over...

    Asked by cristiannavas30 on via web

    1 educator answer

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