Julie of the Wolves Questions and Answers

Julie of the Wolves

The attitudes that Julie (or Miyax) has toward nature encourage the use of personification, which means to endow concepts or inanimate objects with human characteristics. This is distinguished from...

Latest answer posted December 20, 2019, 1:31 am (UTC)

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Julie of the Wolves

In the novel Julie of the Woods, the title character, Julie, whose traditional name is Miyax, bounces back and forth between pursuing traditional and modern ways of life. When Miyax meets Atik and...

Latest answer posted September 30, 2019, 2:45 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Julie of the Wolves

As a character in part one ("Amaroq, the Wolf"), Julie exhibits the character traits of determination, patience, and brotherhood. First, Julie exhibits determination. Even though Julie is lost on...

Latest answer posted March 24, 2016, 11:58 am (UTC)

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Julie of the Wolves

An example of personification is when the wolves are anthropomorphized, giving human qualities to them. They become Julie's friends and companions on the harsh environment of the tundra. Amaroq,...

Latest answer posted June 20, 2007, 4:29 am (UTC)

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Julie of the Wolves

In Julie of the Wolves, the character known as both Miyax and Julie exhibits many strengths. She is an Alaskan Native girl (called Eskimo in the terminology of the time) who is fleeing an arranged...

Latest answer posted January 8, 2019, 3:30 am (UTC)

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Julie of the Wolves

The author describes Miyax's appearance directly four pages into the book. She says,"Miyax was a classic Eskimo beauty, small of bone and delicately wired with strong muscles. Her face was...

Latest answer posted March 13, 2008, 3:05 pm (UTC)

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Julie of the Wolves

Hmmm. I found one example of what might be considered onomatopeia in the phrase "A snowstorm of cotton-grass seeds blew past her face." As critic M.H. Abram notes, "there is no exact duplication...

Latest answer posted June 24, 2007, 4:29 am (UTC)

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Julie of the Wolves

When the wolves want to express their admiration and homage towards their leader, they bite him gently under the chin. To signal his approval in response to their expression of love, the leader...

Latest answer posted December 22, 2008, 3:29 am (UTC)

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Julie of the Wolves

Miyax has been staying in the woods with the wolves but she relalizes that the weather is getting worse and she needs to leave. She decides to find a village so that she can get some help from...

Latest answer posted August 13, 2009, 3:00 am (UTC)

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Julie of the Wolves

Miyax throws her i'noGo tied away because it makes her feel different from the more Americanized Eskimo girls. Miyax had lived with her father at seal camp when she was younger, and at the camp had...

Latest answer posted October 21, 2009, 5:54 am (UTC)

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Julie of the Wolves

Miyax has a name for each member of her "wolf family". She calls the patriarch and leader of the pack, a "regal black wolf", "Amaroq". Amaroq's mate, and the mother...

Latest answer posted January 4, 2009, 10:42 am (UTC)

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Julie of the Wolves

It's first important to mention the exact moment that Miyax is accepted into the tribe: when she pats the leader, Amaroq, under the chin because "as his eyes softened, ... Miyax was one of the...

Latest answer posted October 19, 2011, 1:07 am (UTC)

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Julie of the Wolves

In Julie of the Wolves, Miyax is a thirteen-year-old Eskimo girl who is desperately trying to survive in the wilderness with the help of a wolf pack that she actually manages to join. In the first...

Latest answer posted July 28, 2021, 6:09 pm (UTC)

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Julie of the Wolves

Tornait is Miyax's last tangible link to her Eskimo heritage in its unsullied form. When the bird dies, Miyax accepts that she has no choice but to accept that things are changing, and that she...

Latest answer posted October 21, 2009, 12:52 am (UTC)

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Julie of the Wolves

The book is written for young readers, and so has a simple style intended to be easily understood. Instead of using Realism or Naturalism in describing the wolves and nature, the author uses...

Latest answer posted December 31, 2012, 9:47 pm (UTC)

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Julie of the Wolves

In part 1 of Julie of the Wolves, Miyax gains access to food in three specific ways. Initially her hope is that she can befriend the wolf pack, be accepted as one of them, and reap the benefits of...

Latest answer posted August 12, 2018, 8:11 pm (UTC)

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Julie of the Wolves

Readers can get a solid physical description of Miyax in paragraph 8 of chapter 1. Much of this paragraph contains direct characterization, where the narrator gives us specific details about Miyax....

Latest answer posted May 8, 2019, 3:26 pm (UTC)

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Julie of the Wolves

There are two Kapugens in the story, one human and one animal. The first of them is Miyax' father, Kapugen. Miyax loves her father, with whom she lives at seal camp for many years in between the...

Latest answer posted November 21, 2009, 1:37 am (UTC)

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Julie of the Wolves

By far the main character in this story is the girl the book is named for. She is called Julie (her white people name) or Miyax (her native name). The only other real human character in my mind is...

Latest answer posted April 20, 2010, 2:09 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Julie of the Wolves

Although I am not sure what kind of quote you are looking for, I will give you a few that relate directly to one of the central themes in the book - Miyax's search for her cultural identity. Since...

Latest answer posted February 27, 2009, 1:29 am (UTC)

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Julie of the Wolves

As we learn right at the start of Julie of the Wolves Miyax is lost. Not only that, but she's hungry and has been without food for "many sleeps" on the North Slope of Alaska. Miyax never believed...

Latest answer posted August 25, 2021, 1:34 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Julie of the Wolves

Actually, Julie does not use what you refer to as an "uno," but she uses a "woman's knife" that is specifically referred to as a "ulo." This ulo is one of the items Julie makes sure to take from...

Latest answer posted March 22, 2016, 9:48 am (UTC)

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Julie of the Wolves

According to the story, Miyax wants to get a job on the North Star, once she gets to Point Hope. Basically, the North Star is a ship that brings supplies from the United States to cities in the...

Latest answer posted February 5, 2019, 9:13 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Julie of the Wolves

The part of the plot that you are asking about is in part one of Jean Craighead George's story. At this point in the book, Julie is referred to by her Eskimo name, Miyax. She is completely lost,...

Latest answer posted May 1, 2016, 12:20 am (UTC)

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Julie of the Wolves

In short, Miyax is "alone and lost" because she has run away from her mentally ill husband, Daniel, in a desperate attempt to travel to her pen pal, Amy, in San Francisco. Unfortunately, Miyax...

Latest answer posted March 22, 2016, 9:59 am (UTC)

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Julie of the Wolves

Miyax associates golden brown with memories of her father, as that was the color of his simple little house. She also thinks fondly back to the days of the Bladder Festival, an annual seal hunting...

Latest answer posted June 7, 2019, 7:52 am (UTC)

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Julie of the Wolves

The wolves killed caribou by closing in on them. At one point in the story, Miyax states, “They’re chasing the weakest… It’s just like Kapugen said- wolves take the old and sick.” During a...

Latest answer posted March 30, 2016, 6:03 pm (UTC)

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Julie of the Wolves

When the old Eskimo hunters would talk about someone being wealthy, they were not referring to how much money the person had or how many things. They were talking about wealth in a more spiritual...

Latest answer posted April 12, 2010, 10:14 am (UTC)

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Julie of the Wolves

Miyax, also known as Julie, never does get to San Francisco. Early on in the story, Miyax pledges to run away from Alaska and from her "terrifying husband" to what she imagines will be the haven of...

Latest answer posted January 23, 2020, 6:00 pm (UTC)

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Julie of the Wolves

Miyax loses her navigation skills in the tundra because "the barren slope stretches for three hundred miles...no roads cross it...the view in every direction is exactly the same". It is...

Latest answer posted December 27, 2008, 3:04 pm (UTC)

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Julie of the Wolves

I would like to clear up point of view for you. First person point of view is when a character in the story is telling it, so the reader sees events from the narrator's point of view only.Third...

Latest answer posted June 18, 2007, 6:00 am (UTC)

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Julie of the Wolves

This question could be referring to several different parts of the book, but I think that it is likely asking about the opening events in part one of the book. Miyax is afraid because she is lost...

Latest answer posted May 27, 2016, 2:05 pm (UTC)

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Julie of the Wolves

This is not really a fair question because Julie is still technically a child throughout the entire book. In fact, Julie is forced into an arranged marriage once she turns thirteen and experiences...

Latest answer posted March 23, 2016, 9:24 am (UTC)

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Julie of the Wolves

The answer to this question can be found in part 3 of the book. Miyax is out hunting for food, and she is hoping to snare a rabbit. She follows a rabbit trail until it terminates at the "roost." It...

Latest answer posted May 3, 2019, 9:19 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

Julie of the Wolves

I don't think we are given any reason to distrust Kapugen's reasoning to his daughter. From what we see of their relationship, and the obvious pleasure that Miyax takes in her life and in the close...

Latest answer posted December 29, 2011, 8:47 pm (UTC)

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Julie of the Wolves

Miyax knows from lessons she learned from her father that "time in the Arctic (is) the rhythm of life". She measures the days and nights according to what she knows about the Arctic...

Latest answer posted January 2, 2009, 1:46 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Julie of the Wolves

Miyax is trying to get to San Francisco because she essentially feels that she has nowhere else to go. Her own life situation has become unbearable, but she has received a friendly letter from a...

Latest answer posted January 9, 2010, 1:53 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Julie of the Wolves

That is a super cool part of the book. Me, personally, I would be terrified by hanging out with a bunch of wolves. Miyax, though, is completely calm around the wolves. She is calm because she...

Latest answer posted May 2, 2016, 1:16 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Julie of the Wolves

This is an interesting and tough question. Readers are told throughout the story that it took a certain number of days for something to happen or that it had been a certain number of days since...

Latest answer posted April 7, 2019, 8:46 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Julie of the Wolves

The simple answer to your question is that Miyax's father, Kapugen, lives in the town of Kangik at the end of the novel. The longer answer to your question involves Kapugen's history with his...

Latest answer posted March 22, 2016, 10:23 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Julie of the Wolves

There is one very simple explanation as to how Julie survives in the challenging environment of the Alaskan tundra: she uses the "old ways" of the Eskimo to overcome fear. Fear becomes easy for...

Latest answer posted March 24, 2016, 11:39 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Julie of the Wolves

In the more remote places in Alaska, such as in Mekoryuk where Julie lived with her Aunt Martha, there was no high school. Eskimo children of wealthy families were sent to the mainland for further...

Latest answer posted December 14, 2009, 11:48 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Julie of the Wolves

Miyax's most life threatening predicament is survival. She decided to run away from home and head toward San Francisco to meet her pen pal. Unfortunately Miyax became hopelessly lost. She is way...

Latest answer posted August 22, 2015, 2:14 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Julie of the Wolves

The town of Kangik is introduced to Julie/Miyax after her adventures with the wolves when she is approached by a citizen from the town and told that her father, Kapugen, who is described as "the...

Latest answer posted March 23, 2016, 10:02 am (UTC)

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Julie of the Wolves

Kapugen is Miyax's father, and he taught her a great deal about wolves. There is not a single location to look for this answer in the story, because Miyax is constantly being reminded of things...

Latest answer posted May 20, 2020, 9:48 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Julie of the Wolves

You can understand the difference in the songs that Julie sings by re-reading the what happens in the paragraphs that precede the song. The songs are easy to find in the book, as they are set off...

Latest answer posted December 4, 2019, 7:01 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Julie of the Wolves

To find the answer to this, all you have to do is look in the book. It's in the first chapter, page 8 in my copy. This is where Miyax's physical appearance is being described to us. The author...

Latest answer posted May 4, 2010, 10:23 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Julie of the Wolves

The young adult novel Julie of the Wolves tells the story of Julie/Miyax, a teenage Inuit (“Eskimo”) girl. The author, Jean Craighead George, refers to the protagonist by the Inuit name “Miyax”...

Latest answer posted January 16, 2020, 2:19 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

Julie of the Wolves

The answer to this can be found very early in the book. It is on page 26 in my copy. The reason is that if she does not do this, she could easily die. The reason that she could die is that (she...

Latest answer posted May 7, 2010, 10:14 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

Julie of the Wolves

The wolves seem to single out the weakest of the caribou for their kill. Instinctively, they seem to know that a reasonabley healthy caribou can outrun them, but if the wolves can just manage to...

Latest answer posted November 16, 2009, 7:11 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

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