The Jilting of Granny Weatherall Questions and Answers

The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

The memory that was most painful to Granny was the day she was jilted by George "...since the day the wedding cake was not cut, but thrown out and wasted." Granny, Ellen, felt like the...

Latest answer posted July 17, 2008 3:21 am UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

You are right in identifying the subtlety of the title. The first jilting is of course easy to identify, as it refers to the jilting that Granny Weatherall suffered so long ago and which seems to...

Latest answer posted February 6, 2011 6:16 pm UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

Granny's physical circumstances are pretty plain: she's eighty years old, near death, and in bed at her daughter's house, drifting in and out of consciousness. Her mental state is a little more...

Latest answer posted June 21, 2019 12:55 pm UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

Granny Weatherall has been through a lot. Twenty years earlier, when she was sixty years-old, "she had felt very old, finished, and went around making farewell trips to see her children and...

Latest answer posted May 7, 2019 9:33 pm UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

While she is sick, Granny notes that she "isn't too old yet" to give advice to Lydia about her children. Her son Jimmy had continued to ask her for business advice. Granny indicates that Cornelia...

Latest answer posted April 5, 2013 4:46 pm UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

It is clear that Granny's possession of love letters to both George, the man who jilted her, and John, the man she eventually married and had children with, reflects her continued romantic feelings...

Latest answer posted March 1, 2012 2:02 pm UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

This is the first paragraph of the story:She flicked her wrist neatly out of Doctor Harry’s pudgy careful fingers and pulled the sheet up to her chin. The brat ought to be in knee breeches....

Latest answer posted September 8, 2008 6:31 am UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

The action of the story alternates between the bedroom where Granny Weatherall lies on her death-bed and the depths of her disturbed imagination. The two locations mirror one another: both are...

Latest answer posted November 29, 2018 8:18 am UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

Katherine Anne Porter allows the reader to share a dying woman’s thoughts in “The Jilting of Granny Weatherall.” Most of the story is told using the literary device of stream of consciousness. This...

Latest answer posted December 19, 2012 1:16 am UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

"The Jilting of Granny Weatherall" has a fairly interesting narrative point of view. The story is told from the third-person perspective. Readers get plenty of third-person pronouns, like "she," to...

Latest answer posted February 22, 2019 2:57 pm UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

You have asked lots of questions, so I have edited it down to one question focussing on the general narrative method adopted and how it affects the story. The stream of consciousness narrative...

Latest answer posted September 16, 2010 9:47 am UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

It could be said that, at the end of the story, Granny doesn't have any kind of understanding of any aspect of her condition. In regard to a religious understanding of her spiritual condition, the...

Latest answer posted March 22, 2019 6:35 pm UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

Yes, Ellen Weatherall has persevered through a great many difficult times. When she is sending Doctor Harry away at the beginning of the story, she talks about "pull[ing] through milk-leg and...

Latest answer posted November 30, 2019 1:41 pm UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

The man in the cart could be John, he had taken the reins before in her life and led her on a safe journey--their life together with their children. She recognized "him by his hands, driving...

Latest answer posted July 17, 2008 3:33 am UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

The ending of the story leaves the reader feeling the fear and loss that Granny is going through. The role of women in the south was limited and marriage was the ultimate sense of validation. To be...

Latest answer posted January 8, 2008 12:48 am UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

If we examine the last paragraph of this story, we can see that the author links the jilting of Granny Weatherall that she experienced in her younger days with a final, or ultimate "jilting" that...

Latest answer posted May 9, 2011 7:16 pm UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

In “The Jilting of Granny Weatherall,” Granny’s attitude toward her illness, the doctor, and Cornelia is one of pride and contempt. To understand Granny's contempt, the reader needs to understand...

Latest answer posted March 29, 2019 5:14 pm UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

Perhaps the greatest differences between Katherine Anne Porter's "The Jilting of Granny Weatherall" and a typical fairy tale are the plot structures, the main characters, and the denouements. PLOT...

Latest answer posted June 27, 2010 2:48 pm UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

I think Granny Weatherall dies very clearly in a state of resigned despair.  The ending of the story shows that she has been jilted twice.  The last paragraph states, "For a second...

Latest answer posted July 24, 2007 9:32 pm UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

Granny Weatherall is a bitter old woman (although still likeable in many ways) who is angry about being jilted by the love of her life at the altar before their wedding. He failed to show up and...

Latest answer posted September 27, 2008 9:13 am UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

Granny is a proud woman in the way she keeps her house and takes care of her children; she thinks her husband, John, would be proud to see how hard she had worked. However, the secret she harbors...

Latest answer posted July 16, 2008 5:51 pm UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

You have asked an excellent question that relates to the ending of the story, the symbolism of the light that Granny Weatherall blows out and also the importance of her jilting to her life and how...

Latest answer posted November 3, 2010 12:54 am UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

Whether or not she cares to admit it to herself, Granny Weatherall is reaching the end of her life as the story begins, and during the course of this story she spends time reminiscing about, among...

Latest answer posted February 8, 2021 4:05 pm UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

Hapsy, Lydia, and Jimmy are three of Granny Weatherall's children. Lydia lives "eighty miles" away, and often drives that distance "for advice when one of the children (jump) the...

Latest answer posted October 7, 2008 7:56 am UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

What's significant about the title is that Granny Weatherall's jilting has been the defining event of her whole adult life. Even as she lies on her deathbed, it's all she can think, dream, and...

Latest answer posted January 18, 2019 7:14 am UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

Your question is interesting because it seems to imply that Granny Weatherall has actually managed to process and deal with her feelings of hurt and rejection about being jilted in her youth....

Latest answer posted July 10, 2011 7:58 pm UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

I think it's interesting to note that the stories were written within one year of each other: "A Rose for Emily" was written in 1929, and "The Jilting of Granny Weatherall" was written in 1930....

Latest answer posted November 10, 2018 11:40 pm UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

Granny Weatherall does not want to die. She tells her doctor to leave her alone and go tend to the sick people. Her life is slipping away as she drifts in and out of consciousness. Granny’s...

Latest answer posted January 20, 2013 9:52 pm UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

I think one element about Granny Weatherall's character that comes across incredibly strongly is her independence and inner-strength. Part of the reason why she is so cantankerous in her near-death...

Latest answer posted December 3, 2010 6:30 pm UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

Granny might have a few different reasons for treating her daughter, Cornelia, with hostility. The main one seems to be that Cornelia is taking care of Granny when the old woman would rather be...

Latest answer posted May 23, 2016 3:15 pm UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

The last line of the story depicts Granny's death, "She stretched herself with a deep breath and blew out the light." Granny is a woman, who even as she is dying, denies that she is dying. She has...

Latest answer posted October 14, 2009 8:07 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

See my answer to your question in the Question and Answer section. I think the author intentionally left some things vague. My grandmother was a Cherokee who left that culture to marry my white...

Latest answer posted January 31, 2008 6:00 pm UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

This is a rather novel way of approaching this excellent short story. Let us remember that the five stages of death as presented by Kubbler Ross are, in order: denial, anger, bargaining,...

Latest answer posted September 23, 2011 7:57 pm UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

Granny finds the doctor unnecessary and disrespectful, thinking, "The brat ought to be in knee breeches." When he tells her to be "a good girl," Granny is offended: "That's no way to speak to a...

Latest answer posted September 17, 2010 5:03 pm UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

Good question. The answer depends on when you are asking. By that I mean, in the very first lines of the story she is dismissive. She flatly says, “Get along now. Take your schoolbooks and go....

Latest answer posted February 20, 2007 12:45 am UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

As Granny fades in and out of consciousness, the lines between the present and the past, reality and memory are blurred. For this reason, Granny's recognition of the presence of the priest, Father...

Latest answer posted January 28, 2016 4:37 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

Isn't that a tough one? I actually came back to this question several times before deciding sure, I'll take a swing at it. I would say that line has two meanings. First, it is meant to be a cranky...

Latest answer posted March 16, 2007 12:03 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

The answer is d: Granny hallucinates and thinks that Hapsy, who is dead, has come into the room, but it is actually Lydia, who enters. In the fifth paragraph from the last, beginning with "Light...

Latest answer posted April 26, 2016 11:41 pm UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

If you read everything in terms of being entertained, you might consider this idea. There are other reasons to read other than personal enjoyment, although it is always great to enjoy personally...

Latest answer posted March 26, 2009 11:39 am UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

Overall, Granny Weatherall tries to prove through her self-analysis that her life was never wasted, and this is a direct denial of a life very seldom contemplated internally. Going back in the...

Latest answer posted February 15, 2010 12:58 am UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

"The Jilting of Granny Weatherall" and "Young Goodman Brown" are antithetical, exact opposites, in all points but two. Katerine Ann Porter writes Granny Weatherall as a complaint against anonymity,...

Latest answer posted December 30, 2009 4:16 am UTC

1 educator answer

The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

The story begins with Alice receiving some lessons from her older sister in the yard of their home. She is bored by the lessons and starts to daydream. She suddenly spots a white rabbit wearing...

Latest answer posted June 8, 2013 5:58 pm UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

I would not characterize "Granny Weatherall" as crazy. That is a very broad term that can be interpreted many ways. :-) Her mind is actually sharp until the very end! She reflects on...

Latest answer posted March 14, 2008 12:09 am UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

In the very first paragraph, Granny Weatherall grows quite irritated with Doctor Harry—a man who is evidently many years her junior—because he treats her with condescension despite her advanced...

Latest answer posted August 16, 2018 10:47 pm UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

The story remains true to the themes of uncertainty and disjointedness in both form and content. In terms of format, the narrative of "The Jilting of Granny Weatherall" follows the stream of...

Latest answer posted April 24, 2015 3:57 pm UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

Granny Weatherall's name seems to carry some meaning as well. She's survived more than one terrible illness, being jilted at the altar, and raising her children alone after her husband, John, died...

Latest answer posted June 23, 2018 12:32 am UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

The narrator of this story is a third-person omniscient narrator who can see into the mind of Granny Weatherall. The reader is privy to her innermost thoughts as she is on her deathbed. Because...

Latest answer posted October 14, 2008 11:03 am UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

In the end of the story we realize that Granny Weatherall had NOT achieved the spiritual redemption that she attempted to obtain by asking God for a sign to "another life". This, however, was...

Latest answer posted July 19, 2010 12:36 pm UTC

1 educator answer

The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

That depends entirely on perspective, but the stream of consciousness technique is often used to penetrate deeper inside the psyche of the character in order for the reader to determine the extent...

Latest answer posted September 14, 2010 11:34 pm UTC

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The Jilting of Granny Weatherall

Granny suffered the cruel disgrace of being left at the altar unwed for the rest of her life. She married after and was happy but she wanted a sense of eternal justice in the hereafter. While...

Latest answer posted January 29, 2009 1:14 am UTC

1 educator answer

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