Jane Eyre Questions and Answers

Jane Eyre

"Reader, I married him." This famous line encapsulates the ending of Jane Eyre as a culmination of all the many tribulations the character has endured. In Rochester she finds her equal and her...

Latest answer posted March 31, 2015 3:47 am UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

In those days, walking was a form of exercise and entertainment. Ten-year-old Jane is not fond of it, however, since many days it is very cold, and she does not like the cold. She walks with her...

Latest answer posted February 10, 2013 10:38 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

What makes Jane so throughly modern is that she lives life on her own terms and no one else's. She has a very strict moral code, and she follows that code to the letter, come what may. Although she...

Latest answer posted March 15, 2019 6:15 am UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Rudeness is familiar to Jane; kindness is not. Ironically, people can be more comfortable with negative situations if there is a familiarity to them. And, although she is not the equal of Mr....

Latest answer posted June 30, 2012 1:12 am UTC

5 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Charlotte Bronte knew full well the implications of placing the initial proposal of marriage of Rochester to Jane on Midsummer's Eve (June 20th.) The festival of Midsummer was related to...

Latest answer posted January 8, 2009 12:30 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

The major episodes involving psychic interventions and telepathy come in other chapters of Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre. There is, however, one suggestive passage in Chapter 10. Once Miss Temple...

Latest answer posted March 5, 2012 6:25 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

A thesis statement is used in argumentative essays to present the author’s perspective on a central component of the literary work. An effective statement for a novel is one that pertains to the...

Latest answer posted December 23, 2019 2:14 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

What I find most admirable about Jane is similar to what accessteacher says. I find her adherence to principle in the face of great pressure to be inspiring and uplifting. When the man she loves,...

Latest answer posted August 30, 2010 4:24 pm UTC

5 educator answers

Jane Eyre

The development of the title character in Chapters XI-XIV of Charlotte Brontë’s novel Jane Eyre is mainly a development from uncertainty and nervousness to self-assurance and confidence. When we...

Latest answer posted March 3, 2012 6:17 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Fortunately, in spite of all we are led to believe from Jane's interview with Brocklehurst, Miss Maria Temple is of an entirely different disposition and character, as Jane herself discovers as she...

Latest answer posted February 21, 2011 7:36 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Dictionary.com defines coincidence as: a striking occurrence of two or more events at one time apparently by mere chance: Our meeting in Venice was pure coincidence.Coincidence can be just that in...

Latest answer posted July 29, 2008 4:53 am UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

A gothic heroine is one who often "aims to socialize and educate its female readers and is usually morally conservative." Those qualities certainly define Jane. She is an educated woman who did...

Latest answer posted January 18, 2009 11:24 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

This reference comes at the very end of Chapter Twenty, where Mr. Rochester is talking to Jane after she has been tending to Mr. Mason who has been bitten by the yet-undiscovered Bertha. After yet...

Latest answer posted December 3, 2009 6:06 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

In Charlotte Brontë's novel, Jane Eyre, Jane leaves Mr. Rochester, and she refuses to return, saying that perhaps they will meet again one day in heaven. 'One instant, Jane. Give one glance to my...

Latest answer posted February 9, 2011 11:58 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

In Chapter 18 of Jane Eyre, Mr. Mason arrives from the West Indies. Jane notes that Rochester is upset upon hearing that Mason is visiting. She also learns that Rochester spent time in the West...

Latest answer posted May 12, 2016 3:16 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Bertha Mason is Mr. Rochester’s secret first wife whom he confines to the attic in Thornfield Hall. Bertha is responsible for the eerie noises that Jane hears at night. She occasionally escapes her...

Latest answer posted October 23, 2020 1:56 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre has these thoughts as she reenters Thornfield after an early evening walk. On this walk to mail a letter, she had encountered a strange man who had been thrown from his horse, sprained...

Latest answer posted February 27, 2021 11:15 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

There are several qualities that make the Reeds regard Jane as an outsider. First, she is an orphan, and Mrs. Reed seems to consider giving her a warm place to sleep and some food as though she...

Latest answer posted December 29, 2009 5:47 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

From the beginning of Jane Eyre's relationship with Helen Burns, Jane is struck by Helen's seeming detachment from her immediate circumstances. This detachment is associated with her particular...

Latest answer posted July 5, 2019 6:21 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Throughout Jane Eyre, Bronte shows Jane as a person who stands up actively for what she thinks is right. For instance, early in the novel, Jane, as the poor relation, defends herself against Mrs....

Latest answer posted May 12, 2018 2:21 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

The girl in the garden is Helen Burns, who Jane first sees reading a book. At first Jane feels an affinity for Helen because she is reading but she soon learns that Jane is much more an example of...

Latest answer posted December 13, 2008 10:44 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

It happens multiple times in the novel -- Jane's desire to be true to herself (her conscience, her friends, or her concept of self), but the world is arrayed against her. It begins in her...

Latest answer posted June 6, 2010 12:10 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Brontë uses setting masterfully at the beginning of the novel to quickly show the reader Jane's emotional and mental state. Two important themes of the novel are shown right in the first scene:...

Latest answer posted December 29, 2009 11:51 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

This question really depends on what you mean by 'independence'.Literal independence comes for Jane when she is able to escape her step mother by applying to be a nanny. She is able to leave the...

Latest answer posted October 28, 2008 6:44 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

It is important to remember that this excellent novel is an example of a bildungsroman: a novel of education, where the central character develops and matures and is shaped by the experiences they...

Latest answer posted April 4, 2011 8:17 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

In Chapter 23, Jane is overcome with grief, believing she must leave Thornfield. Jane can no longer bear the intense love she has for Mr. Rochester, thinking that Blanche Ingram is to be his bride....

Latest answer posted June 11, 2019 2:44 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Charlotte Bronte wrote Jane Eyre in 1847 at the end of the Romantic period in English Literature. Because women were not encouraged to write, Bronte published her book under the pseudonym, Currer...

Latest answer posted November 8, 2012 1:35 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

In the beginning of the novel, Jane mentions the long walks the Reed family goes on. She emphasizes that she doesn’t enjoy these walks because they are cold and remind her of her “physical...

Latest answer posted May 5, 2019 5:02 am UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Religion is a key theme in this novel and in particular Bronte's attitudes towards evangelicalism, and we have a significant number of examples of this in the text, in particular the Christianity...

Latest answer posted September 5, 2010 9:13 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

At the time of writing the learning of French (and other languages) was a prerequisite for any young lady of the middle class and up. Note how later on in the novel Jane Eyre begins to learn German...

Latest answer posted November 10, 2010 7:44 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

In Charlotte Brontë's classic novel Jane Eyre, the titular character Jane eventually runs away from Mr. Rochester after she finds out that he is already married to a woman named Bertha and has been...

Latest answer posted March 21, 2018 4:06 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre is often regarded as one of the earliest major feminist novels because it gives voice and opportunity to a woman in the patriarchal society of the Victorian Era. In...

Latest answer posted May 9, 2016 6:57 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

As a child, Jane is alone a great deal, but she enjoys her solitude. In Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre, Jane likes to be alone as she notes at the story's beginning, while she is reading on the...

Latest answer posted June 2, 2013 2:22 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Right from the outset, Lowood is described as a sparse place, where there are no luxuries and few opportunities for happiness. It is a place where “plain fare, simple attire, [and] unsophisticated...

Latest answer posted March 16, 2021 11:36 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

While the ending of Jane Eyre is a little too contrived, is this contrivance not typical of Victorian novels? Certainly, Dickens's use of dopplegangers and coincidences as well as his excessive...

Latest answer posted December 28, 2011 5:01 am UTC

3 educator answers

Jane Eyre

In chapter 18, a fortune-teller arrives. Mr. Rochester is not present (and we later find out that he has disguised himself as the fortune-teller). A footman approaches and whispers to Mr. Eshton...

Latest answer posted July 4, 2018 1:29 am UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

There are many "minor" characters in Jane Eyre that affect Jane's development from the angry girl we meet at the beginning of the novel to the confident, strong-willed woman she becomes by the end....

Latest answer posted January 26, 2016 1:56 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Bronte's novel is broken up into three main parts: Jane's childhood tribulations, her work as a governess, and her life as a rural teacher. If you look at the novel that way, you can surely find...

Latest answer posted October 23, 2013 7:25 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Your question suggests that Jane had a clear idea of what she was expecting when she was sent to Lowood. Actually, the text indicates she had no such idea and that she went to Lowood without any...

Latest answer posted March 1, 2012 2:43 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

The only problem with your idea at present is the way in which Jane's journeys at times clearly take her away from her goal of finding a family and being loved. For example, take her flight from...

Latest answer posted November 6, 2013 6:37 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

The passage in Jane Eyre that surrounds the phrase “I did not like re-entering Thornfield” appears after Jane has been at Thornfield as a governess in the employment of Mr. Rochester for several...

Latest answer posted January 30, 2021 6:15 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

As could be expected, Jane Eyre does not accept the fact that Mr. Rochester is a married man very easily. Her whole life up until meeting Mr. Rochester has been one where she has not experienced...

Latest answer posted June 23, 2007 4:09 am UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

What a great comparison! A knee jerk reaction would be to say, "Not very much!" Helen and Mrs. Reed are very different sorts of people, after all. Helen, one is tempted to say, is a kind of emblem...

Latest answer posted April 2, 2016 1:31 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre herself is an important expression of the feminist voice in the novel, and so is Rochester's wife, Bertha. From being locked in the Red Room to exiled at the miserable Lowood School, Jane...

Latest answer posted August 23, 2018 11:23 am UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Rochester obviously lacks a certain sense of social decorum. Here he is, in his own driveway, having fallen from his horse and been rescued by his new employee, and he doesn't even bother to...

Latest answer posted December 9, 2008 9:12 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Jane and Rochester argue about giving in to temptation in chapter 14. That might sound boring, but Chapter 14 of Jane Eyre is a perfect example of 19th century flirting. They are just getting to...

Latest answer posted October 13, 2011 12:42 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Jane truly loves Rochester, and has loved him since she worked for him at Thornfield. She couldn't marry him while he was still married to Bertha, though. Also, she had reservations about marrying...

Latest answer posted March 25, 2009 10:34 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

What more is there than love? She had everything else offered to her--friendship, marriage, companionship--yet she doesn't settle permanently with any one of them. Instead, she's not content...

Latest answer posted July 19, 2010 12:58 pm UTC

4 educator answers

Jane Eyre

There are several similarities between the main characters of Jane Eyre and The Turn of the Screw, the most obvious being their job. Jane Eyre and the nameless woman in The Turn of the Screw are...

Latest answer posted March 31, 2016 10:31 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

In Charlotte Brontë’s novel Jane Eyre, Jane at one point describes her first evening at Thornfield. Having traveled a long journey to get there and feeling very tired, Jane is pleased to find that...

Latest answer posted February 18, 2012 10:50 am UTC

1 educator answer

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