Jane Eyre Questions and Answers

Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre is nothing more than a burden in the eyes of the cruel Mrs. Reed. The orphaned Jane is the niece of the late Mr. Reed. At his urging, Mrs. Reed grudgingly agrees to takes her in and then...

Latest answer posted October 23, 2020 2:13 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

There are several examples of Jane's strong and determined character n the novel. One is that she doesn't become consumed by anger and rebellion despite her appalling experiences in the household...

Latest answer posted January 20, 2013 11:18 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Jane's early life has constantly attempted to force her to acknowledge that she is nothing, has no power, and must simply accept what is grudgingly given to her. In addition, she is poor and is...

Latest answer posted January 13, 2018 9:33 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Bullying is presented in this novel as a character flaw. The way to overcome it is by being a person of character and internal strength. The most obvious example of bullying occurs when Jane is...

Latest answer posted September 21, 2007 6:10 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

The Red Room is a sad memory from Jane’s childhood. It is symbolic of anger and pain. It was Jane’s original prison. When she finds out that Rochester cannot marry her because he is still...

Latest answer posted March 15, 2012 12:52 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Jane is able to forgive Mrs. Reed because of her own maturity, grace, and self-awareness. As an adult, Jane can clearly see the moral failings of her relatives and understands why they treated her...

Latest answer posted October 23, 2020 11:31 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Mr. Brocklehurst believes that the poor girls in the orphanage must be taught to endure privation for the betterment of their souls. He wants to "render them hardy, patient,...

Latest answer posted October 3, 2007 2:28 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

For much of the novel, motherhood is extremely important because of the absence of a mother in Jane’s life. Given her status as an orphan, she lacks both parents, but her lack of a mother is shown...

Latest answer posted January 21, 2020 11:18 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

This is a very interesting question, because, to my mind, no examination of St. John Rivers would be complete without also comparing him to his foil in the novel - Edward Rochester, therefore, if...

Latest answer posted September 14, 2010 8:44 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Jane's unclear social position drives her internal conflict, as well as much of the novel's external conflict. Orphaned as a young girl, Jane begins the novel in a precarious social position. She...

Latest answer posted July 22, 2009 5:15 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Characters in Jane Eyre portray a wide range of religious sensibilities. At the Lowood School, Helen Burns is a good Christian who genuinely lives out her faith. She is forgiving, caring, and kind,...

Latest answer posted October 10, 2018 7:09 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

In Chapter Eight of Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre, the reader first hears of Jane's progress in her studies at Lowood Institution: Already I had made visible progress: that very morning I had...

Latest answer posted February 13, 2012 7:22 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

An example of a symbol in Jane Eyre is fire, which represents rebirth. Fire has many meanings in literature. It can often symbolize rebirth, such as a phoenix rising from the ashes. In this case,...

Latest answer posted May 30, 2013 10:14 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

The function of the setting of Thornfield Hall in Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre is to establish the repressive but opulent setting in which Edward Rochester resides, and where Jane will work as a...

Latest answer posted November 29, 2014 1:06 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Jane gets the opportunity for some major payback on Mrs. Reed in chapter 4. Jane's aunt and her vile offspring have made the young girl's life an absolute misery ever since she arrived at...

Latest answer posted February 14, 2020 8:00 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

In Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre, Chapter Twelve, the narrator (Jane) begins by describing her inner ear, and the stories her imagination hears in the absence of action—in the constant presence of a...

Latest answer posted October 26, 2011 1:08 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Despite the tendency of most stage and film adaptations to set Jane Eyre in the 1840s, the period of its composition and publication, the text itself suggests a pre-Victorian setting. To be sure,...

Latest answer posted September 18, 2020 11:51 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Jane and Pip are from similarly poor and deprived backgrounds, and they are both orphans who experience a harsh upbringing, but they have different personalities, especially when it comes to...

Latest answer posted January 14, 2013 9:05 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Rich in imagery, Chapter 23 of Jane Eyre finds Jane in the garden of an evening delighting in the beautiful jewels of color as the sun sets in a "furnace flame at one point on the hill peak" when...

Latest answer posted November 8, 2011 2:52 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

In Chapter 17 of Jane Eyre, the guests of Mr. Rochester, the Ingrams, arrive at Thornfield. While Jane seeks seclusion from the aristocratic party, Mrs. Fairfax informs her that it is Mr....

Latest answer posted May 10, 2012 2:30 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre is a novel of proto-feminism, which most certainly asserts a woman’s, especially, right to choose her own destiny. This is a claim for individualism in a society (Victorian England)...

Latest answer posted January 30, 2012 12:08 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Well, I think the "means more than it says" part applies to most of the book. Part of what makes Jane Eyre so interesting is how Jane develops as a character over time, and how the reader's...

Latest answer posted March 11, 2016 12:59 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Victorians loved comparing women to birds. To the typical Victorian sentimentality, a woman was like a bird. She was beautiful and delicate. She needed to be taken care of, because on her own...

Latest answer posted October 12, 2011 2:24 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

No, Jane does not think that she is inferior to Mr. Rochester. Jane is an educated woman who is subjected to a caste system of society, but that does not make her less capable in any way to stand...

Latest answer posted April 23, 2013 5:06 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

When her horrible aunt, Mrs. Reed, determines to send Jane away to school, Jane leaves to attend Lowood, under the administration of Mr. Brocklehurst. Mrs. Reed believes that Jane is a wicked...

Latest answer posted July 26, 2019 10:39 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

The orphaned Jane Eyre, brought to the home of her uncle John Reed, has only been tolerated during her stay by Mrs. Reed because of her husband's insistence. On his deathbed, he made his wife...

Latest answer posted November 12, 2011 9:25 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

The blind Rochester exclaims this near the end of the novel, when Jane returns to him. As he realizes, from the sound of her voice, that it is really her, he simply can't believe it. At first, he...

Latest answer posted August 18, 2018 11:30 am UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Without question, works of fiction are shaped by their times, and, of course, Jane Eyre is no exception. Set in the Victorian era, this novel reflects several political and social conditions, which...

Latest answer posted November 20, 2014 10:01 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

The above quote is taken from Chapter 17 of Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre, and the pronoun of “she” refers to Blanche Ingram, a beautiful socialite from the old Victorian aristocracy who wants to...

Latest answer posted May 24, 2016 6:50 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Mr. Brocklehurst is one of the villains of the novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë. He is the head of Lowood, a charity boarding school Jane attends, and a strict evangelical. He argues that...

Latest answer posted June 16, 2018 11:18 pm UTC

5 educator answers

Jane Eyre

One of the things that Jane learns is that you can't always rely on people just because they're members of your family. When Jane is sent to live with her rich aunt and cousins at Gateshead, she's...

Latest answer posted January 7, 2019 12:13 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

This novel doesn't have a particularly complex plot structure. It is autobiographical in the sense that it is told in first person and follows Jane's life from her youth to her happy marriage and...

Latest answer posted July 9, 2010 1:47 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

There are many ways in which this novel could be viewed as being romantic. First and foremost, Jane is a character who lives a kind of Cinderella existence, moving from rags to riches in a way that...

Latest answer posted September 9, 2013 5:14 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

In Chapter Four of this novel we are presented with the character of Brocklehurst, and the overwhelming impression we receive of him, and in particular his "brand" of Christianity, is that he is a...

Latest answer posted October 24, 2010 10:06 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre is born into privilege, but is placed in an orphanage as a child. She gains an education at the orphanage and once she reaches an age when she can leave the orphanage, she is hired as a...

Latest answer posted February 25, 2015 8:11 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

In chapter 16 in Jane Eyre, the housekeeper, Mrs. Fairfax, informs Jane that Mr. Rochester has left Thornfield Hall to visit the home of the Eshtons, where he will meet with “fine, fashionable...

Latest answer posted April 30, 2019 8:04 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre journeys from childhood to maturity through attending Lowood school. She is sent to the charity boarding school after she responds with an outburst of violence to the repeated bullying...

Latest answer posted January 23, 2018 11:59 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Lowood School is not a happy place for children and especially not for Jane Eyre, thanks to her aunt warning the manager, Mr. Brocklehurst, that Jane is not to be trusted. It is an asylum for...

Latest answer posted February 29, 2020 12:24 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Remember when this part of the novel occurs: Jane has just gone through the traumatic revelation of finding out that Mr. Rochester is already married, and thus is unable to marry her true love. She...

Latest answer posted May 11, 2010 11:04 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

The suspense that builds in Jane Eyre is meant to create mystery and ambiguity around the setting of Thornfield Hall, Mr. Rochester's family home, which houses his mad wife, Bertha Mason, in a...

Latest answer posted March 14, 2018 1:50 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Mr. Rochester feels like he has been dealt an unfair hand in life because he was duped into a marriage with a lunatic. Back then, divorce just wasn't socially or religiously acceptable. He felt...

Latest answer posted February 13, 2013 5:59 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

In the era in which Jane Eyre takes place - the early nineteenth century, education existed according to social status. Boys and girls were taught separately and subjects differed between genders;...

Latest answer posted May 28, 2013 5:52 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

After Jane is confined in the red room of the Reed house, she senses the recurring memory of the trauma she experienced whenever her individual self-expression or independence is challenged or...

Latest answer posted June 9, 2016 2:18 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

I see that previous answers have focused on Jane Eyre, but the question leaves open the possibility for the songs to be applied to Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe. An advantage to this question...

Latest answer posted July 7, 2019 7:55 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Jane wants to escape many things throughout her life, beginning with her aunt and cousins, who she lives with at Gateshead Hall. Her parents are dead, and her aunt and cousins treat her terribly....

Latest answer posted January 20, 2019 4:10 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Mr. Rochester sardonically accepts that, as a youth, he was a victim of "a cruel hoax". He was duped into marrying the beautiful Bertha Mason, whose relatives hid from him the fact that...

Latest answer posted December 12, 2008 1:40 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

The best way to understand Jane is to recognize her plight. The novel opens with her living with her Aunt Reed who neglects her and her cousins who abuse her. She has no champion but herself upon...

Latest answer posted December 3, 2013 5:27 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

In Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre, Jane must confront two situations that will affect her residence at Lowood. First, Miss Temple—Jane's friend and mentor—marries and moves away. Her departure makes...

Latest answer posted October 24, 2011 3:49 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

This is an interesting assignment, and can be used not only to show knowledge of crucial chapters in Jane Eyre but also of the period as a whole. First, you need to invent a fictional occasion for...

Latest answer posted March 12, 2012 5:15 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë is a complex novel which embodies the characteristics of many types of novels, and of course it is still read today because it has something important to say. While it...

Latest answer posted December 17, 2013 5:04 pm UTC

1 educator answer

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