Jane Eyre Questions and Answers

Jane Eyre

Charlotte Bronte, through her character Jane Eyre, shows a strong belief in the sanctity of a legal marriage. To Jane the marriage bond is not merely a convenience but a sacred trust. Therefore,...

Latest answer posted August 10, 2018 1:09 am UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

The tale of Jane Eyre is clearly one of self-discovery and maturation. Indeed, it is the story of a young woman's fight to claim independence and self-respect amid a society that prohibits her from...

Latest answer posted September 2, 2013 7:47 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Although it is clear that Jane does literally save Rochester's life in a physical way (he needs help now that he has suffered tremendous injuries), it is important to note that his true salvation...

Latest answer posted August 21, 2008 10:53 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

One of the principal ways in which belonging as a theme is presented in this powerful work of literature is the way that the relationship between Jane and Rochester develops throughout the novel. A...

Latest answer posted January 22, 2012 1:45 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

There's a lot going on in Jane Eyre which parallels the tropes of Gothic novels. One of the key features in Jane Eyre which strikes the reader as Gothic is its use of buildings and landscapes...

Latest answer posted February 18, 2019 2:59 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

In Charlotte Brontë's beloved gothic novel, most of the characters at some point lose their innocence. Their reaction to this loss of innocence tells us much about them as people. Jane, primarily,...

Latest answer posted May 2, 2018 8:32 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

I am not sure if it is fair to say that Jane's marriage to Rochester is anti-feminist because she becomes a caretaker for her husband. Of course, to discuss this, one would have to clearly define...

Latest answer posted February 4, 2018 2:46 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Jane does care for her cousin St. John, but more like a brother. She considers his proposal of marriage very seriously because it was not uncommon back in the 19th century for a girl to marry a...

Latest answer posted January 19, 2016 6:43 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre and Blanche Ingram share several similarities. Blanche does not have much money, as most of it must go to her brother: we learn from Mrs. Fairfax that "neither she nor her sister have...

Latest answer posted May 26, 2018 10:12 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

From the isolated and chilly reading topic of Jane at the very beginning of the novel, we receive many different impressions of how she is excluded and kept out in the cold and not allowed to...

Latest answer posted January 16, 2012 1:30 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

In Chapter Four of this novel we are presented with the character of Brocklehurst, and the overwhelming impression we receive of him, and in particular his "brand" of Christianity, is that he is a...

Latest answer posted October 24, 2010 10:06 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

The protagonist of Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte is Jane Eyre. In the novel, Jane begins as an unwanted and rather persecuted orphan who becomes a governess by being diligent in her studies (and...

Latest answer posted October 31, 2013 7:51 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

In chapter 10, Jane wonders about procuring employment outside of the Lowood school. She stays up late one night and tries to figure out how she could get a job without having a vast network of...

Latest answer posted October 13, 2018 6:46 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

The chapters you want to focus on are 33 and 35 to answer this question. Chapter 33 details how St. John one snowy night comes to Jane´s school house and tells her about her uncle dying and then...

Latest answer posted May 11, 2010 10:14 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre has two love interests in the novel, Mr. Rochester, whom she grows to love after serving as his daughter's governess, and St. John Rivers, a minister and her cousin who repeatedly asks...

Latest answer posted January 3, 2008 8:18 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Charlotte Bronte maintains a feeling of suspense throughout Jane Eyre by keeping the reader unsure how the story will end through a series of twists, turns, and unexplained happenings. According...

Latest answer posted October 1, 2017 9:59 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Near the end of Chapter II of Charlotte Brontë’s novel Jane Eyre, young Jane is locked in a room and, while there, imagines that she may see the ghost of Mr. Reed: I thought Mr. Reed’s spirit,...

Latest answer posted February 28, 2012 12:26 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Religion plays a strong and complex role in Jane Eyre. I will focus on two aspects of religion in the novel: deformations of Christianity as either hypocrisy or over-rigidity and true religious...

Latest answer posted September 5, 2019 7:30 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Without question, works of fiction are shaped by their times, and, of course, Jane Eyre is no exception. Set in the Victorian era, this novel reflects several political and social conditions, which...

Latest answer posted November 20, 2014 10:01 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

St. John Rivers, Jane Eyre's cousin, represents cold-blooded morality. He acts as a foil or opposite to Mr. Rochester, who represents a flawed and sometimes immoral passion that runs hot. St. John,...

Latest answer posted October 23, 2020 11:22 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

In literary terms, a foil is a character in a story who is markedly different from the protagonist. Foils are used in order to spotlight the characteristics of the principal character. In Jane...

Latest answer posted February 11, 2020 5:07 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

This is a woman's novel, and in it, women play a large variety of roles. Jane Eyre herself is the steady force throughout the novel; this her story, and it is told in her voice. As an everywoman...

Latest answer posted June 14, 2018 9:08 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Of course, it is largely a matter of personal preference, but on the whole, it seems reasonable to argue that Mr. Rochester is a sympathetic character. This is true largely for two reasons: First...

Latest answer posted October 23, 2020 11:20 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

In the seventeenth and eighteenth century there was both a philosophical and psychological debate about how the mind was formed and stocked with ideas. While some viewed a child's mind as a blank...

Latest answer posted July 11, 2010 10:29 am UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Jane’s first meeting with Rochester is ironic because when he is injured she offers to help, and she does not know that he is hew new employer. He is weak and she is strong, in this case. It’s...

Latest answer posted March 15, 2012 3:27 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Well, of course we are approaching the end of the book here in chapter 36, and Jane has matured into a model young woman (some critics say that she was ALWAYS a mature and model young woman). I...

Latest answer posted June 26, 2015 4:16 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

In Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre, Chapter Nineteen has revolved around a house party at Thornfield where Miss Ingram, her mother and other members of the elite society (of which Rochester is a part)...

Latest answer posted March 5, 2012 7:22 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

In Chapter 17 of Jane Eyre, the guests of Mr. Rochester, the Ingrams, arrive at Thornfield. While Jane seeks seclusion from the aristocratic party, Mrs. Fairfax informs her that it is Mr....

Latest answer posted May 10, 2012 2:30 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

When Jane has the temerity to speak her mind in retaliation of her older cousin's violence, he attacks her. In her desperation to defend herself, she "received him in frantic sort," and, strictly...

Latest answer posted October 4, 2018 11:23 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

This is a very interesting question, because, to my mind, no examination of St. John Rivers would be complete without also comparing him to his foil in the novel - Edward Rochester, therefore, if...

Latest answer posted September 14, 2010 8:44 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Jane’s artwork is “typical” in the sense that her talent as an artist is an “accomplishment” polished young ladies are expected to have. When Bessie comes to visit her at Lowood, she exclaims over...

Latest answer posted April 30, 2016 12:53 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Mr. Lloyd was the local apothecary. He is called in after Mrs. Reed thrusts the terrified Jane Eyre back in the red room, where she fears seeing the ghost of Mr. Reed. Jane has a "species of fits"...

Latest answer posted June 23, 2019 5:42 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

In Chapter 21 Jane returns to Gateshead to see her dying aunt who has been asking for her. Interestingly this allows the reader ample evidence of how Jane's character has developed in the interim...

Latest answer posted May 10, 2010 6:46 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Which particular words are you refering to? I wonder if your question relates to the following lines of this chapter, which is of course a key moment in this brilliant novel, as Rochester finally...

Latest answer posted November 2, 2011 11:58 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

This is a very interesting question to consider. I would argue that the chief archetype that links both of these excellent texts involves the archetype of the journey. However, in the case of these...

Latest answer posted July 24, 2011 10:14 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

In the time when the Brontes pursued their writing, it was certainly thought 'unfeminine' for 'gentlewomen' to write books, and certainly all the more so if they were actually trying to earn a bit...

Latest answer posted January 20, 2010 11:25 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

There is a sense in which that in this novel, which is so dominated by its protagonist, the other characters only exist in terms of what they show about Jane's character. Throughout the novel one...

Latest answer posted May 30, 2011 8:03 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

In those days, walking was a form of exercise and entertainment. Ten-year-old Jane is not fond of it, however, since many days it is very cold, and she does not like the cold. She walks with her...

Latest answer posted February 10, 2013 10:38 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Charlotte Brontë was heavily influenced by the gothic romance tradition when she wrote Jane Eyre. Popularized in the late-eighteenth century and lingering into the early decades of the nineteenth,...

Latest answer posted December 15, 2020 7:10 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Fortunately, in spite of all we are led to believe from Jane's interview with Brocklehurst, Miss Maria Temple is of an entirely different disposition and character, as Jane herself discovers as she...

Latest answer posted February 21, 2011 7:36 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Jane's early life has constantly attempted to force her to acknowledge that she is nothing, has no power, and must simply accept what is grudgingly given to her. In addition, she is poor and is...

Latest answer posted January 13, 2018 9:33 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Literally, Bertha Mason is a very real impediment to Jane's marriage to Mr Rochester. Since he is still married to her, his marriage to Jane cannot progress as planned.As a metaphor, Bertha...

Latest answer posted June 4, 2008 11:43 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Jane gets the opportunity for some major payback on Mrs. Reed in chapter 4. Jane's aunt and her vile offspring have made the young girl's life an absolute misery ever since she arrived at...

Latest answer posted February 14, 2020 8:00 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

When Jane goes to Thornfield, she spends some time there before she actually means the man of the house. In chapter 11, Jane learns about the man of the house with these wry comments. “Yes,” she...

Latest answer posted May 4, 2012 5:42 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

The girl in the garden is Helen Burns, who Jane first sees reading a book. At first Jane feels an affinity for Helen because she is reading but she soon learns that Jane is much more an example of...

Latest answer posted December 13, 2008 10:44 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

The blind Rochester exclaims this near the end of the novel, when Jane returns to him. As he realizes, from the sound of her voice, that it is really her, he simply can't believe it. At first, he...

Latest answer posted August 18, 2018 11:30 am UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

The above quote is taken from Chapter 17 of Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre, and the pronoun of “she” refers to Blanche Ingram, a beautiful socialite from the old Victorian aristocracy who wants to...

Latest answer posted May 24, 2016 6:50 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

At the time of writing the learning of French (and other languages) was a prerequisite for any young lady of the middle class and up. Note how later on in the novel Jane Eyre begins to learn German...

Latest answer posted November 10, 2010 7:44 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Mr. Brocklehurst is one of the villains of the novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë. He is the head of Lowood, a charity boarding school Jane attends, and a strict evangelical. He argues that...

Latest answer posted June 16, 2018 11:18 pm UTC

5 educator answers

Jane Eyre

The suspense that builds in Jane Eyre is meant to create mystery and ambiguity around the setting of Thornfield Hall, Mr. Rochester's family home, which houses his mad wife, Bertha Mason, in a...

Latest answer posted March 14, 2018 1:50 am UTC

1 educator answer

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