Questions and Answers for Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre

Jane's arrival at Thornfield Hall marks the end of her needing to rely on others for care and the beginning of her earning her own way. Initially, she must rely on the so-called "care" of her Aunt...

Latest answer posted January 18, 2011 5:03 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

When young Jane reacts to the testimony of Miss Temple on her behalf in Chapter 8 as she is unfairly accused of being a liar by narrating, I would not now have exchanged Lowood with all its...

Latest answer posted May 10, 2012 6:22 am UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

No, Jane did not feel welcomed in the home of her aunt and cousins. When the novel Jane Eyre began, Jane described how she dreaded coming home after a long walk because she felt inferior to her...

Latest answer posted December 21, 2015 7:46 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

This is a very interesting question to consider. I would argue that the chief archetype that links both of these excellent texts involves the archetype of the journey. However, in the case of these...

Latest answer posted July 24, 2011 10:14 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

It happens multiple times in the novel -- Jane's desire to be true to herself (her conscience, her friends, or her concept of self), but the world is arrayed against her. It begins in her...

Latest answer posted June 6, 2010 12:10 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

I will add two more: Miss Temple, who is a beacon to her students and worshiped by them, and St. John Rivers, Jane's cousin. St. John is clearly linked to St. John the Apostle, who wrote five books...

Latest answer posted April 16, 2008 1:59 am UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

In Chapter Four of this novel we are presented with the character of Brocklehurst, and the overwhelming impression we receive of him, and in particular his "brand" of Christianity, is that he is a...

Latest answer posted October 24, 2010 10:06 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

The best way to answer this question is to look at how Jane decides to resist her inner desires and follow Rochester to Europe and become his mistress. Clearly, this is one of the crucial decisions...

Latest answer posted June 10, 2011 9:06 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

The protagonist of Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte is Jane Eyre. In the novel, Jane begins as an unwanted and rather persecuted orphan who becomes a governess by being diligent in her studies (and...

Latest answer posted October 31, 2013 7:51 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

The quote refers to how Jane is molded and changed by all the suffering that she has endured throughout her life and by the suffering that she has observed inflicted on others. Early in the book,...

Latest answer posted June 27, 2020 11:35 am UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Of course, it is largely a matter of personal preference, but on the whole, it seems reasonable to argue that Mr. Rochester is a sympathetic character. This is true largely for two reasons: First...

Latest answer posted October 23, 2020 11:20 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

In chapter 10, Jane wonders about procuring employment outside of the Lowood school. She stays up late one night and tries to figure out how she could get a job without having a vast network of...

Latest answer posted October 13, 2018 6:46 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

In Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre, Chapter Nineteen has revolved around a house party at Thornfield where Miss Ingram, her mother and other members of the elite society (of which Rochester is a part)...

Latest answer posted March 5, 2012 7:22 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre has two love interests in the novel, Mr. Rochester, whom she grows to love after serving as his daughter's governess, and St. John Rivers, a minister and her cousin who repeatedly asks...

Latest answer posted January 3, 2008 8:18 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

While Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre is not traditionally (and singularly) considered a Gothic novel. It is, rather, a "trifecta" (triple) of sorts. The novel is Gothic (mysterious regarding...

Latest answer posted October 23, 2013 10:57 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

As part of the gothic genre, Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre is a narrative of darkness, shadows and eerie light. With imagery, Chapter 2 of this novel highlights the contrast between Jane's...

Latest answer posted May 1, 2011 2:54 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

This is a very interesting question, because, to my mind, no examination of St. John Rivers would be complete without also comparing him to his foil in the novel - Edward Rochester, therefore, if...

Latest answer posted September 14, 2010 8:44 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

This is a woman's novel, and in it, women play a large variety of roles. Jane Eyre herself is the steady force throughout the novel; this her story, and it is told in her voice. As an everywoman...

Latest answer posted June 14, 2018 9:08 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre is a more complex novel than many, and as such doesn't have a true antagonist. The story is set in several parts. At times, characters act as antagonists, while at other times, the main...

Latest answer posted May 8, 2019 6:43 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Mr. Brocklehurst is one of the villains of the novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë. He is the head of Lowood, a charity boarding school Jane attends, and a strict evangelical. He argues that...

Latest answer posted June 16, 2018 11:18 pm UTC

5 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Emily Bronte's Jane Eyre abounds with figurative language and various literary devices; therefore, there will be some examples provided here, but not all. Chapter XXXIV Metaphors (unstated...

Latest answer posted December 9, 2014 10:19 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

The short answer to this question would be that Jane Eyre is ultimately a Victorian novel. However, it features heavy traces of the romantic era in its imagery and plot devices. In particular,...

Latest answer posted October 22, 2020 11:28 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

In chapter 16 in Jane Eyre, the housekeeper, Mrs. Fairfax, informs Jane that Mr. Rochester has left Thornfield Hall to visit the home of the Eshtons, where he will meet with “fine, fashionable...

Latest answer posted April 30, 2019 8:04 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

In Chapter 17 of Jane Eyre, the guests of Mr. Rochester, the Ingrams, arrive at Thornfield. While Jane seeks seclusion from the aristocratic party, Mrs. Fairfax informs her that it is Mr....

Latest answer posted May 10, 2012 2:30 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

In those days, walking was a form of exercise and entertainment. Ten-year-old Jane is not fond of it, however, since many days it is very cold, and she does not like the cold. She walks with her...

Latest answer posted February 10, 2013 10:38 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

There are several examples of Jane's strong and determined character n the novel. One is that she doesn't become consumed by anger and rebellion despite her appalling experiences in the household...

Latest answer posted January 20, 2013 11:18 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

The chapters you want to focus on are 33 and 35 to answer this question. Chapter 33 details how St. John one snowy night comes to Jane´s school house and tells her about her uncle dying and then...

Latest answer posted May 11, 2010 10:14 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

As an unloved, unwanted orphan, Jane's very much one of society's outcasts. Things don't get any better when she goes to stay at Gateshead Hall with her aunt and cousins. Jane's aunt—the thoroughly...

Latest answer posted September 26, 2018 8:22 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Deprivation of physical and emotional needs is a formula for disaster in the human psyche. Mr. Brocklehurst's sadistic treatment of the girls serves only to destroy any self-worth in the...

Latest answer posted November 7, 2010 1:42 am UTC

3 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Charlotte Bronte maintains a feeling of suspense throughout Jane Eyre by keeping the reader unsure how the story will end through a series of twists, turns, and unexplained happenings. According...

Latest answer posted October 1, 2017 9:59 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

No, Jane does not think that she is inferior to Mr. Rochester. Jane is an educated woman who is subjected to a caste system of society, but that does not make her less capable in any way to stand...

Latest answer posted April 23, 2013 5:06 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

As could be expected, Jane Eyre does not accept the fact that Mr. Rochester is a married man very easily. Her whole life up until meeting Mr. Rochester has been one where she has not experienced...

Latest answer posted June 23, 2007 4:09 am UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

In Charlotte Brontë's beloved gothic novel, most of the characters at some point lose their innocence. Their reaction to this loss of innocence tells us much about them as people. Jane, primarily,...

Latest answer posted May 2, 2018 8:32 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Literally, Bertha Mason is a very real impediment to Jane's marriage to Mr Rochester. Since he is still married to her, his marriage to Jane cannot progress as planned.As a metaphor, Bertha...

Latest answer posted June 4, 2008 11:43 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Jane's unclear social position drives her internal conflict, as well as much of the novel's external conflict. Orphaned as a young girl, Jane begins the novel in a precarious social position. She...

Latest answer posted July 22, 2009 5:15 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

One of the things that Jane learns is that you can't always rely on people just because they're members of your family. When Jane is sent to live with her rich aunt and cousins at Gateshead, she's...

Latest answer posted January 7, 2019 12:13 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

At the time of writing the learning of French (and other languages) was a prerequisite for any young lady of the middle class and up. Note how later on in the novel Jane Eyre begins to learn German...

Latest answer posted November 10, 2010 7:44 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

In literary terms, a foil is a character in a story who is markedly different from the protagonist. Foils are used in order to spotlight the characteristics of the principal character. In Jane...

Latest answer posted February 11, 2020 5:07 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë is a complex novel which embodies the characteristics of many types of novels, and of course it is still read today because it has something important to say. While it...

Latest answer posted December 17, 2013 5:04 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Lowood School is not a happy place for children and especially not for Jane Eyre, thanks to her aunt warning the manager, Mr. Brocklehurst, that Jane is not to be trusted. It is an asylum for...

Latest answer posted February 29, 2020 12:24 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Jane's early life has constantly attempted to force her to acknowledge that she is nothing, has no power, and must simply accept what is grudgingly given to her. In addition, she is poor and is...

Latest answer posted January 13, 2018 9:33 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Miss Temple has a lasting effect on the girls because she genuinely cares about them and shares their trials. Mr. Brocklehurst, on the other hand, is a hypocrite who lives well while lecturing the...

Latest answer posted April 30, 2016 5:54 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Jane’s first meeting with Rochester is ironic because when he is injured she offers to help, and she does not know that he is hew new employer. He is weak and she is strong, in this case. It’s...

Latest answer posted March 15, 2012 3:27 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Whereas it is a frightened, insecure child who battles the cruel repression of self that is presented in the beginning of Jane Eyre, it is a young lady with a sense of self and assuredness that...

Latest answer posted January 17, 2013 8:18 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

When Jane goes to Thornfield, she spends some time there before she actually means the man of the house. In chapter 11, Jane learns about the man of the house with these wry comments. “Yes,” she...

Latest answer posted May 4, 2012 5:42 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

In Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë, the character of Jane Eyre stands in for the author in a certain way and the portrait of Jane is intended to be laudatory. Looking at it from a more objective...

Latest answer posted May 27, 2012 8:19 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

In Chapter Eight of Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre, the reader first hears of Jane's progress in her studies at Lowood Institution: Already I had made visible progress: that very morning I had...

Latest answer posted February 13, 2012 7:22 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

The above quote is taken from Chapter 17 of Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre, and the pronoun of “she” refers to Blanche Ingram, a beautiful socialite from the old Victorian aristocracy who wants to...

Latest answer posted May 24, 2016 6:50 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

In Chapter 18 of Jane Eyre, Jane has observed the party of aristocrats who are staying at Thornfield, and assessed their personalities, especially that of Blanche Ingram, daughter of the Dowager...

Latest answer posted June 1, 2013 9:22 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

In Charlotte Brontë's novel, Jane Eyre, Jane leaves Mr. Rochester, and she refuses to return, saying that perhaps they will meet again one day in heaven. 'One instant, Jane. Give one glance to my...

Latest answer posted February 9, 2011 11:58 am UTC

1 educator answer

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