Questions and Answers for Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre

There is nothing in the novel to suggest that the name has any significance beyond mere convenience. At the time, Jane explains her use of the alias by saying, "Anxious as ever to avoid discovery,...

Latest answer posted April 28, 2019 3:30 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

In the novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, the author shows us a man, Mr. Rochester, who has already had one tragic marriage and has a somewhat closed heart (symbolized by his lack of...

Latest answer posted February 24, 2010 5:28 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Bronte presents Jane as person guided by her principles, especially her sense of justice. From the earliest part of the novel, we see the young Jane as a person deeply upset by unfairness. She does...

Latest answer posted January 2, 2018 9:18 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

In Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë, Eliza and Georgiana Reed act as foils to the eponymous heroine. As is the case with their mother and brother as well, they are antagonists to the heroine and...

Latest answer posted June 4, 2019 9:30 am UTC

3 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Like everyone else, Jane cannot have complete control over the events of her life, but she can exert a fair measure of control over herself. That’s precisely what she does throughout the story that...

Latest answer posted July 10, 2020 11:02 am UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Helen and Jane become fast friends after they meet on the orphanage playground. Jane has no friends, and Helen is absorbed in her book and attracts the attention of the younger Jane. Helen is not...

Latest answer posted July 16, 2010 6:41 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre is a book full of secrets. Mrs. Rochester is without question the biggest one, but many characters have secrets, or are involved in deceptions of one sort or another. Here are some,...

Latest answer posted March 23, 2016 1:40 am UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

In Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre, one of my favorite passages alludes to Rochester's sense that there is indeed a supernatural quality to Jane that has drawn them together, even attached them. The...

Latest answer posted February 10, 2012 11:52 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Jane saves Mr. Rochester’s life by pouring water on him when he was on fire. Jane discovers that Mr. Rochester’s bed has been set on fire, so she pours water on him. The hiss of the quenched...

Latest answer posted May 28, 2013 7:14 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

A number of feminist scholars have seen elements of Charlotte Bronte's struggle to establish herself in a male-dominated literary world subtly woven into the text of Jane Eyre. Such speculations...

Latest answer posted January 18, 2019 9:36 am UTC

3 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Not unlike Charles Dickens, Charlotte Bronte exposes one of the social institutions of the age and its ill treatment of the orphaned. Her father, Patrick Bronte, was an Anglican minister and of a...

Latest answer posted June 30, 2012 1:31 am UTC

7 educator answers

Jane Eyre

In the book "Jane Eyre," Jane struggles with feelings of loneliness and inadequacy. All her life, she has been seen as plain and "less than" her family members and other children. This has caused...

Latest answer posted May 3, 2016 8:57 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Mrs. Fairfax acts as a kind of surrogate mother to Jane. She's a static character in that she doesn't really change throughout the story. But her role is nonetheless crucial as it provides a...

Latest answer posted January 24, 2019 7:05 am UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

While much emphasis has been placed—and rightly so—on the feminist aspects of Jane Eyre, at the end of the novel Charlotte Bronte hopes to draw reader attention back to her main theme. The main...

Latest answer posted February 4, 2018 12:50 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Jane meets Helen Burns on her first day at Lowood Institution, although she does not learn her name until the next day in class. Jane notices Helen when the girls are sent outside for a period of...

Latest answer posted September 10, 2008 2:56 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Bronte uses first-person narration to raise sympathy for Jane Eyre and to allow us access to her thoughts and emotions. The first-person narration lends an immediacy that allows us to identify...

Latest answer posted December 30, 2018 4:18 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

The full title of Charlotte Brontë’s novel is Jane Eyre, An Autobiography. When it was first published, it was edited by Currer Bell, which as we know now was one of Charlotte Brontë’s pen names....

Latest answer posted January 20, 2019 5:30 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Mrs. Reed has a couple of reasons for wishing to see Jane in chapter 21. Obviously, she wishes to ask for forgiveness and be reconciled to Jane because she does feel remorseful about her actions....

Latest answer posted May 23, 2019 4:39 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

First, you could start by defining the elements of Romanticism on which you plan to focus in your paper. Several aspects of Romanticism relevant to Jane Eyre include first, an emphasis on the...

Latest answer posted April 21, 2016 12:15 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Mr. Rochester's love is problematic through much of the novel. For example, he shows love for his illegitimate daughter Adele by caring for her, giving her gifts, and hiring her a governess in the...

Latest answer posted May 5, 2018 9:53 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

At Gateshead, Mrs. Reed always favors her own three children, Eliza, John, and Georgiania, over the poor relation Jane Eyre. John, especially, torments Jane many times a day, but Mrs. Reed pretends...

Latest answer posted September 18, 2018 3:18 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

In Brontë's Gothic romance, Jane Eyre, justice is a theme that runs throughout the story. Jane Eyre, an orphan, lives with her aunt, Mrs. Reed; she is taunted by her cousins, deceitfully blamed by...

Latest answer posted August 26, 2016 9:31 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

In chapter twenty-six of Jane Eyre, Jane and Mr. Rochester begin their first marriage ceremony. As the minister is performing the ceremony, a strange man bursts into the church and interrupts. He...

Latest answer posted November 25, 2015 8:56 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

There are several important reasons Jane inherits wealth prior to marrying Rochester in the novel "Jane Eyre." First and foremost, as the sole heir, she is able to disperse some of the wealth and...

Latest answer posted May 17, 2019 1:42 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Jane Eyre

The novel is both realist and romantic in that it closely depicts the hard, indeed squalid life of a lowly, orphaned servant girl in Victorian times, but also shows her marrying the love of her...

Latest answer posted December 5, 2012 6:19 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

The suspense in Jane Eyre is the mystery that surrounds Thornfield. For the duration of her stay, Jane hears a strange laughter coming from the supposedly abandoned wing of the manor. She suspects...

Latest answer posted December 22, 2008 11:52 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

The answer to this question can be found in Chapter Thirty-Six, when Jane leaves Moor House, which had been a sanctuary for her, to return to Thornfield Hall and a very uncertain future, knowing...

Latest answer posted July 6, 2011 9:41 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

As the Byronic anti-hero, Mr. Rochester acts as a foil to Jane Eyre. For instance, in his unscrupulous attempt to defy moral law and the mores of his society, he accentuates Jane clear sense of...

Latest answer posted July 26, 2010 4:43 am UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

As in other Victorian novels, marriage, both as an institution and an ideal, come under close scrutiny in Jane Eyre. Marriage with Rochester is Jane's goal and eventual fate. Not only is she...

Latest answer posted November 24, 2013 4:39 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre is an orphan. Her mother married a poor clergyman, which displeased her father, who cut her out of his will. When Jane was very young, her father was visiting the poor in an industrial...

Latest answer posted November 19, 2018 7:22 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

With tone as the writer's attitude toward the readers and toward the subject of the literary work, in Jane Eyre there is a sympathetic tone used in the descriptions of Jane's plights and her search...

Latest answer posted August 1, 2012 3:44 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

It is vitally important to realise that the book that Jane is reading in this first chapter of this incredible novel is not just chosen at random to fill space in the page. No, it is a carefully...

Latest answer posted January 11, 2011 6:46 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Mrs. Reed promised her late husband, Mr. Reed, that she would support Jane after his death. While Mrs. Reed spoils her children John, Georgiana, and Eliza, she does not feel any connection to Jane....

Latest answer posted May 25, 2019 11:28 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

In the opening passages of Chapter 1 of Jane Eyre, the reader learns that Jane considers herself inferior to the Reed children: ...I never liked long walks, especially on chilly afternoons:...

Latest answer posted August 18, 2011 7:10 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Well, of course we are approaching the end of the book here in chapter 36, and Jane has matured into a model young woman (some critics say that she was ALWAYS a mature and model young woman). I...

Latest answer posted June 26, 2015 4:16 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Jane and Rochester are introduced to one another in an unconventional fashion. Jane encounters Rochester on the road and does not know who he is, though he does learn that she is to be the new...

Latest answer posted January 19, 2020 6:49 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre is treated poorly because of her position in the family. She is an unwelcome child that her aunt feels bound to care for. Her aunt is blind to the faults of her own children and often...

Latest answer posted September 19, 2011 11:50 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

With the symbolic motif of fire and ice prevailing throughout Charlotte Bronte's narrative of Jane Eyre's struggle for independence in a Victorian society, her conflicts between passion and...

Latest answer posted November 13, 2011 4:47 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

To answer this question, take a look at Chapter 35. In this chapter, Jane is seriously reconsidering a potential marriage to St. John (whom she earlier refused). As the house falls into silence,...

Latest answer posted August 21, 2017 8:38 am UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Chapter XI records Jane's first impressions of Thornfield's geography and interior. Though it has a medieval feeling, she meets with with great hope and feels at home. These positive feelings are...

Latest answer posted November 4, 2013 9:15 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Bronte uses juxtaposition to prove a point or make a comparison between characters. For example, Helen and Jane are juxtaposed in Chapter six: I could not comprehend this doctrine of endurance;...

Latest answer posted April 4, 2016 9:55 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

In Charlotte' Brontë's Jane Eyre, the significant event that occurs in Chapter 23 is that Edward Rochester declares his love for Jane and asks her to marry him, even though they are from completely...

Latest answer posted February 10, 2012 1:01 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

A major point Bronte makes about family in Jane Eyre is that people who are biologically related to one another—who are "family"—can be toxic to one another. Jane Eyre experiences that through her...

Latest answer posted September 1, 2019 2:13 am UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

In chapter 14 of Jane Eyre, Jane meets with her employer, Mr. Rochester, in a very intimate meeting. Despite being her superior, Mr. Rochester is very chatty with her, and their conversation...

Latest answer posted May 23, 2019 6:27 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

In Gothic literature, the weather is often used to convey the feelings and emotions of its character, in a technique called 'pathetic fallacy.' Using the weather in this way is also useful in...

Latest answer posted January 15, 2016 1:35 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Charlotte Bronte, through her character Jane Eyre, shows a strong belief in the sanctity of a legal marriage. To Jane the marriage bond is not merely a convenience but a sacred trust. Therefore,...

Latest answer posted August 10, 2018 1:09 am UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre struggled with an internal conflict through much of the story. After some time at Thornfield Hall as Adele's governess, Jane began to have romantic feelings toward Mr. Rochester, her...

Latest answer posted January 13, 2016 7:00 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

This is a great question, and of course this quote shows how Rochester has managed to "read" Jane's character and understands her in a way that few other characters in the novel have been able to...

Latest answer posted December 16, 2010 6:01 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

You might like to consider what happens at the end of this chapter and how the lightning bolt is used to foreshadow the very unpleasant discovery of Rochester's first wife. Let us remember that it...

Latest answer posted November 2, 2011 11:52 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

There are two ways Jane feels trapped at Thornfield. First, in a famous passage, Jane thinks about how quiet and stifling her life as a governess is. Mr. Rochester has not yet arrived, and Jane is...

Latest answer posted September 10, 2018 6:52 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Showing 51-100 of 583