Questions and Answers for Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre

Mr. John Rivers recognizes a wisdom and maturity in Jane that surpasses her years; so in Chapter 32, he stops by Jane's cottage to take advantage of her listening ear. Jane knows that Rivers is...

Latest answer posted May 7, 2012 5:17 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

The most important imagery in Jane Eyre is gothic imagery. This is one of the classic Victorian Gothic stories! “Gothic” means dark and relating to supernatural elements. Gothic images do seem...

Latest answer posted October 12, 2011 2:06 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

The significance of reading and writing in Jane Eyre lies in the fact that her education allowed her to move up in Lowood and eventually get hired as a governess at Thornfield (where she meets...

Latest answer posted June 7, 2012 1:41 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Chapter seventeen is the part in the novel where Mr. Rochester is using Ms. Ingram to incite jealousy in Jane and to see if Jane loves him. He may have honestly been considering Ms. Ingram for a...

Latest answer posted December 4, 2015 9:46 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Since you are under time pressure, you might consider focusing on Jane Eyre's experiences at Lowood School, which is a harsh, unloving institution for orphan children like herself. Lowood School is...

Latest answer posted February 28, 2016 4:45 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

That's a tough one... without re-reading the book, I have some suggestions. Early on (like 2 or 3 pages in), Jane talks about a book she is reading. It is Thomas Bewick's "History of British...

Latest answer posted November 10, 2009 7:57 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

My glazed eye wandered over the dim and misty landscape...and now, only a few fields, almost as wild and unproductive as the heath from which they were scarcely reclaimed, lay between me and the...

Latest answer posted January 10, 2010 5:28 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Within the setting of Jane Eyre, the teaching profession was one which a woman entered as a means of supporting herself; therefore, it was not a vocation that upper class women entered unless they...

Latest answer posted November 3, 2015 11:10 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

There are many words one could use to describe Jane Eyre in the first chapter. Of the list provided, I would select "timid" or "intelligent." We know that Jane is timid and shy because of her...

Latest answer posted February 12, 2020 6:54 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

When writing a book review about any book, there are a lot of choices. Since this is not a new book, but a book that is a classic and has been well-read and well-loved, you have two choices:...

Latest answer posted October 25, 2011 2:39 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Throughout her life, Jane has been instructed in duty: at Lowood School, at Thornfield, and now while she lives with the Rivers family who have rescued her from starvation, a family who turns out...

Latest answer posted October 21, 2012 10:59 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre may be a straight-laced governess set in another century, but she is easy to empathize with. She had a difficult childhood and yet overcame that to became a moral and intelligent person....

Latest answer posted May 21, 2010 11:37 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

An example of a significant name in Jane Eyre is Jane’s name, which was carefully chosen to demonstrate her character. Jane Eyre’s name has significance both in terms of her first name and her last...

Latest answer posted May 28, 2013 5:28 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Even without knowing much (outside of books) about the historical position of governesses in society, I know it was an awkward position, at best. People who gave their children almost exclusively...

Latest answer posted August 30, 2010 4:16 pm UTC

4 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë is fairly typical of bigamy novels in using the death of the least sympathetic of the wives as a way of resolving the bigamy plot and providing a conventional happy...

Latest answer posted December 7, 2012 12:07 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

You'll find all the major characters in this great novel summarized and discussed in the "characters" section of the enote on it: http://www.enotes.com/eyre/27968 Greg

Latest answer posted February 16, 2007 9:47 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre is still limited by her gender because many scenes depict her as the physically weak and frail female who needs to be helped, controlled, or rescued by a man. In her interaction with...

Latest answer posted June 23, 2007 4:21 am UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre's character strives for self-awareness but does periodically become distracted, primarily by her tenuous but growing romantic relationship with Mr. Rochester. In chapter 16, Jane becomes...

Latest answer posted August 19, 2019 2:56 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

A psychoanalytical report on Jane Eyre when she was a child would no doubt have to focus on the way that she demonstrates considerable rage and strength when she is in her frenzy. Note the way in...

Latest answer posted October 17, 2013 7:11 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

When Mrs Fairfax shows Jane up to the third story of Thornfield Hall, Jane observes that many pieces of furniture are of older fashions, as if they had been removed to the third story once they...

Latest answer posted July 18, 2018 9:49 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre does seem to go from one genre to another. It is at times a coming of age novel, sometimes a romance, sometimes a Gothic novel. None of these categories are mutually exclusive though....

Latest answer posted December 6, 2012 6:33 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

The multi-layered presentation of gender and class as crucial factors affecting identity and status is a hallmark of Charlotte Brontë’s novel. Jane Eyre has become an enduring character in English...

Latest answer posted March 6, 2021 7:48 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

I would say Bronte was quite effective with her writing style in that she did not come right out and give away plot particulars, but rather allowed her readers to discover what was happening almost...

Latest answer posted January 5, 2008 3:38 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Gothic novels generally have certain characteristics that deal with the supernatural, vast and creepy settings, melodramatic characters and an elevated style of writing. What's interesting about...

Latest answer posted August 22, 2013 7:41 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

What is it that you mean precisely by the phrase "earth love"? There is certainly a very real and genuine friendship between these two characters. It is at Lowood that we see Jane as a character...

Latest answer posted March 2, 2012 12:52 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre has many characteristics that have endeared the novel to its readers. 1. Mystery-- Bronte uses the element of the supernatural to keep readers' interest. Is Thornfield really haunted,...

Latest answer posted June 26, 2012 1:19 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

I have altered your question as it seems to be somewhat confused. Also, if you are looking at religion, you need to think about the whole novel, not just the first chapters. Religion is a key theme...

Latest answer posted May 2, 2010 9:58 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Throughout the narrative Bronte's writing exhibits sympathy for displaced persons. First of all, the plight of the orphan is certainly one that Bronte and other social reformers held as a cause...

Latest answer posted December 18, 2011 6:09 am UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

In the second paragraph, the mood is suitably dark and sombre, matching the atrocious weather conditions. As the story begins, it's dark and wet in the vicinity of Gateshead Hall, which means that...

Latest answer posted September 19, 2019 7:48 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

There is much in Jane Eyre that speaks to gender roles in society. This quote, taken from Chapter Twelve, captures Jane's musings on the 'restraints' place on women by society: Women are...

Latest answer posted June 30, 2012 3:40 am UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

This event occurs in Chapter XV (p.13). In this scene Jane is the narrator/speaker, and she has heard a demoniac laugh from behind the wall. She then hears footsteps going up to the third story...

Latest answer posted January 4, 2018 2:51 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Charlotte Bronte's life was very similar to Jane's actually. They both grew up in a orphan-like situation. Charlotte's mother died when she was very young and her father was distant.Both...

Latest answer posted November 27, 2007 1:05 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Here's one from Eliza talking to Georgiana about her lack of independence: You had no right to be born; for you make no use of life. Instead of living for, in, and with yourself, as a reasonable...

Latest answer posted February 8, 2007 4:02 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

This conceit was used extensively in Victorian literature when the author wanted to use a proper noun, but not give details of person or place. Rather than creating something fictitious, the...

Latest answer posted November 27, 2008 12:27 pm UTC

1 educator answer

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