Questions and Answers for Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre

The pathetic fallacy occurs when the weather or outward scene reflects the inner emotional state of a character. At the beginning of the novel, Jane's inner misery and repressed wildness are...

Latest answer posted January 11, 2021 11:07 am UTC

3 educator answers

Jane Eyre

The ending, in which Jane and Rochester marry, is happy, if bittersweet. It is bittersweet because Rochester has been disabled by the Thornfield fire, losing a hand and his eyesight. He is no...

Latest answer posted August 28, 2018 2:49 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre is a dense book, and the previous educator was correct to point to the themes of class structure, the voice of women in life and literature, and more. Yet perhaps the main theme, the...

Latest answer posted November 16, 2017 5:05 am UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Jane first meets Mr. Rochester as she walking in the dusk on a cold January day to mail a letter in Hay for Mrs. Fairfax. She sees a large dog, hears the thunder of a horse going by, and then hears...

Latest answer posted May 6, 2019 5:21 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

It seems erroneous to say that Jane's internal conflict about her relationship with Rochester is the central conflict of the story because she doesn't really seem to feel very conflicted about it....

Latest answer posted September 9, 2017 11:53 am UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

There is a great deal of bird imagery used in Charlotte Brontë's novel, Jane Eyre. When Jane arrives as a governess at Thornfield, she is much like a bird: nervous and shy, caged in that she can...

Latest answer posted April 3, 2011 5:02 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

There are actually quite a few similarities. Jane was an orphan, and like her, Charlotte grew up without a mother (she died when Charlotte was five). Both Jane and Charlotte were sent away to...

Latest answer posted November 20, 2007 2:36 am UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Charlotte Brontë was heavily influenced by the gothic romance tradition when she wrote Jane Eyre. Popularized in the late-eighteenth century and lingering into the early decades of the nineteenth,...

Latest answer posted December 15, 2020 7:10 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Jane and Mr. Rochester's relationship is based on intelligent equality at first. Mr. Rochester is intrigued with Jane's honesty to his questions which prompts him to inquire more into the way she...

Latest answer posted March 7, 2013 6:51 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

This quote truly characterizes Jane Eyre; she demonstrates throughout the narrative of Charlotte Bronte's novel that she is a "free human being with an independent will." Having been orphaned in...

Latest answer posted March 15, 2017 5:58 am UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre is being raised by her Aunt Reed, after the death of her parents. Jane's mother's brother was Mr. Reed, who had died in the red room. Her Aunt had made a death bed promise to her dying...

Latest answer posted March 1, 2015 4:31 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

In the opening chapter of Bronte's narrative, when little Jane Eyre is not allowed to sit with her cousins near Mrs. Reed because she has not yet acquired the proper social disposition, Jane...

Latest answer posted December 28, 2011 4:43 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Charlotte Brontë's novel Jane Eyre makes use of the literary device sometimes known as the "pathetic fallacy" of projecting human emotions onto inanimate phenomena such as the weather. In...

Latest answer posted May 24, 2015 6:12 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

I would argue that the main idea behind the story is that love conquers all. Throughout the course of the story, Jane experiences all manner of setbacks, most of which would defeat the hardiest...

Latest answer posted July 16, 2019 7:34 am UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

In the novel Jane Eyre, Helen Burns is one of the girls Jane meets at Lowood Orphan Asylum. She becomes Jane's only friend, and is made an example when she is insubordinate by the standards of Miss...

Latest answer posted February 7, 2019 1:15 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

When we are asked about the "Victorian elements" of Jane Eyre, we're being asked to describe the primary themes that seem to have a lot to do with the Victorian era. The Victorian age is called...

Latest answer posted August 3, 2020 12:59 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Jane comes into her own as a person at Lowood, despite the horrific conditions of the school. For the first time, she is in a place where she is not made out to be a burden. Jane is given the...

Latest answer posted November 7, 2018 9:29 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

From an early age, the orphaned Jane is forced to fend for herself and become independent. She is disliked by her aunt Reed, sent off to a charity school, and enters adult life with no fortune or...

Latest answer posted June 1, 2019 11:17 am UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Mr. Rochester and St. John Rivers are literary foils. Simply put, this means that they are characters who offer a contrast to each other. And the contrasts between the two men really couldn't be...

Latest answer posted October 19, 2017 8:49 am UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

St. John wants Jane to marry him, move to India and become a missionary with him. He believes she would make a good missionary wife because of her character and commitment. He has observed what a...

Latest answer posted April 11, 2010 6:08 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre is a Bildungsroman, a coming of age story, because it begins with Jane as a young girl and follows her as she deals with the trials and tribulations of growing into a young woman. Part of...

Latest answer posted March 30, 2012 3:57 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Here is a description that Jane Eyre gives of Thornfield in Chapter 11: "All these relics gave to the third story of Thornfield Hall the aspect of a home of the past: a shrine of memory. I liked...

Latest answer posted October 18, 2016 3:41 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

This is a good question. First, you should note that the major expression of Romanticism in the English novel was called the "Gothic" novel, and thus when we talk about Romantic qualities in the...

Latest answer posted January 17, 2017 10:41 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Irony occurs when situations turn out the opposite way than one might expect or when words mean the opposite of what was intended. There are small and large examples of irony throughout Jane Eyre....

Latest answer posted January 31, 2021 11:20 am UTC

3 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Jane also notices that Thornfield is three stories high and of considerable size, befitting the house of a gentleman. She describes it as "picturesque" with "battlements round the...

Latest answer posted June 20, 2007 7:16 am UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

In perhaps the most famous sentence in the novel, Brontë begins her final chapter with these simple four words: "Reader, I married him." Up until this point, we have been on a stormy, dramatic ride...

Latest answer posted December 16, 2019 6:28 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

There are certainly Gothic elements throughout the novel, from beginning to end. Consider the rather imposing and frightening homes in which Jane spends time. How about the ideas of a mystery in...

Latest answer posted August 30, 2010 4:32 pm UTC

4 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Blanche Ingram is a character foil that helps to shine light on the heart of who Jane Eyre is, simply because Jane never goes out of her way to explain herself to the reader. This is the first big...

Latest answer posted February 11, 2020 8:15 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Jane Eyre

This passage in Jane Eyre evokes the theme of Jane’s independence, and, by extension, her feminism. Specifically, Jane’s sense of self-reliance and view that status does not come from age, gender...

Latest answer posted June 23, 2020 12:37 pm UTC

6 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Mr. Rochester actually has numerous pet names for Jane; he calls her "malicious elf," "child," "sprite," "provoking puppet," "witch," "skylark," and various other names depending on the mood he's...

Latest answer posted October 23, 2020 12:40 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

The horse-chestnut tree symbolizes the relationship between Jane and Mr. Rochester. Jane goes for a walk in the orchard, down to the horse-chestnut tree. She is momentarily at peace: Here one...

Latest answer posted January 1, 2019 11:36 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre is both the title of a novel by Charlotte Bronte and the name of that novel's protagonist. From her earliest days, Jane Eyre's life is fraught with tragedy. Jane is an orphan who lived...

Latest answer posted June 25, 2016 3:37 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Jane and Bertha and often read as doubles of each other—that is, Bertha is in some ways a prefiguration of what Jane is or will become if she accepts Rochester's illicit proposal. On the face of...

Latest answer posted December 24, 2019 2:02 pm UTC

4 educator answers

Jane Eyre

With Jane Eyre as narrator of her novel, Charlotte Bronte gives voice to her concerns about the treatment of children as well as her perception--much like that of her contemporary, Charles...

Latest answer posted December 30, 2009 3:49 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Ferndean is where Jane and Rochester start their new life together as husband and wife. They find the happiness there that eluded them at Thornfield, the burning of which represents the end of...

Latest answer posted September 30, 2019 1:30 am UTC

4 educator answers

Jane Eyre

In a literary work, mood is kindled in the reader by means of setting, theme, diction, and tone. These elements generate emotional responses in readers and thereby establish the emotional...

Latest answer posted March 26, 2017 2:25 am UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Gateshead is the grand house where Jane lives in the beginning of the novel as a poor dependent with her Aunt Reed and three cousins, Georgiana, Eliza, and John. Her aunt is incapable of loving her...

Latest answer posted December 7, 2017 11:01 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

In Charlotte Brontë’s famous novel Jane Eyre, Jane is around nineteen years old and Mr. Rochester is described as being between thirty-five and forty years old. When Jane first encounters him, she...

Latest answer posted October 23, 2020 1:16 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Your question is a little confused and also seems to ask more than one question. Whilst you are right to identify that certain locations in the novel seem to have symbolic significance, the names...

Latest answer posted April 25, 2010 6:58 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Bronte addresses various types of education in Jane Eyre, arguing that one’s complete education is critical to fulfillment in life. However, that education goes beyond books. For Jane, education...

Latest answer posted August 19, 2019 3:19 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

I think there are many similarities between Jane Eyre and Mr. Rochester. In a way, both characters are trapped in their lives. Jane is held to a certain role because of her social standing and...

Latest answer posted February 14, 2012 11:11 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre can be considered a feminist novel, or perhaps more accurately, a protofeminist novel. Works that were written before the twentieth century with strong female protagonists fall into this...

Latest answer posted September 11, 2017 9:18 pm UTC

4 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Not unlike Charles Dickens, Charlotte Bronte exposes one of the social institutions of the age and its ill treatment of the orphaned. Her father, Patrick Bronte, was an Anglican minister and of a...

Latest answer posted June 30, 2012 1:31 am UTC

7 educator answers

Jane Eyre

In the novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, the author shows us a man, Mr. Rochester, who has already had one tragic marriage and has a somewhat closed heart (symbolized by his lack of...

Latest answer posted February 24, 2010 5:28 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

When Jane Eyre is hired to work as a governess at Thornfield Hall, she is initially happy with the position, as it will put her seventy miles closer to London than the Lowood School. As she...

Latest answer posted February 27, 2020 12:51 pm UTC

4 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Jane was locked up in the red room as a punishment for striking John Reed, her degenerate young master. She did not deserve this treatment, because John started the confrontation by mercilessly...

Latest answer posted September 10, 2008 2:32 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Helen and Jane become fast friends after they meet on the orphanage playground. Jane has no friends, and Helen is absorbed in her book and attracts the attention of the younger Jane. Helen is not...

Latest answer posted July 16, 2010 6:41 am UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre is a book full of secrets. Mrs. Rochester is without question the biggest one, but many characters have secrets, or are involved in deceptions of one sort or another. Here are some,...

Latest answer posted March 23, 2016 1:40 am UTC

2 educator answers

Jane Eyre

Ironically, the charades reveal more about Mr. Rochester's relationships with Blanche Ingram and with Jane than reality does. A careful and attentive observer, Jane watches in Chapter 18 as Mr....

Latest answer posted October 30, 2015 4:42 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Jane Eyre

Helen Burns models forgiveness in Jane Eyre and tries to teach the angry young Jane to be more forgiving. When Jane is outraged that Miss Scatcherd unfairly flogs Helen, Helen is forbearing, saying...

Latest answer posted February 25, 2019 2:57 pm UTC

2 educator answers

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