James Kirkup Questions and Answers

James Kirkup

The central message of the poem is that war is a mistaken notion because all people on earth are connected through their common humanity. The poet describes a number of similarities that we share...

Latest answer posted August 3, 2017, 12:40 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

James Kirkup

In "No Men are Foreign," James Kirkup urges us to put aside what he sees as our superficial differences and recognize that we are all ultimately part of one human race. We all share the same earth;...

Latest answer posted November 14, 2018, 8:44 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

James Kirkup

The literal meaning of "uniform" denotes that each country involved in war must identify itself as belonging to that country so as not to kill or harm its own people. Yet, in the wearing of their...

Latest answer posted July 8, 2010, 3:11 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

James Kirkup

In the poem "No Men Are Foreign," the poet, James Kirkup, emphasizes that people are alike, no matter their nationality. In stanza one, the poet tells us that "no men are strange, no countries...

Latest answer posted November 28, 2018, 2:32 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

James Kirkup

Erich Maria Remarque's All Quiet on the Western Front, a novel about a young man's horrors in World War I, expresses much the same sentiment as Kirkup who writes, "eyes like ours that wake or...

Latest answer posted March 30, 2011, 1:42 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

James Kirkup

Kirkup's 1966 poem "No Men are Foreign" focuses on the commonalities between all people. The poem's speaker states of foreigners: They, too, aware of sun and air and water,Are fed by peaceful...

Latest answer posted October 17, 2019, 12:34 pm (UTC)

4 educator answers

James Kirkup

The poem has nine stanzas and is written in free verse. It details a visit to Hiroshima as it moves forward after the devastation of the atomic bomb. The narrator firstly sees a town ‘like any...

Latest answer posted January 29, 2012, 3:55 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

James Kirkup

The essence of Kirkup's poem is that in attacking others deemed foreign, we end up attacking our own and deny the basic element that makes us human. The challenge here is that there might be some...

Latest answer posted July 17, 2010, 8:25 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

James Kirkup

The poem actually consists of just one stanza, comprising twenty lines. The first line of the poem—"Remember, no men are strange, no countries foreign"—conveys its disarmingly simple message:...

Latest answer posted September 26, 2018, 6:40 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

James Kirkup

Because James Kirkup was an English poet, his work is not grounded in Hinduism or Buddhism, but the point of view he is espousing here is somewhat close to Ahimsa, in that he is arguing that since...

Latest answer posted July 10, 2015, 4:34 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

James Kirkup

Kirkup wishes to make the assertion that there is a transcendental life force that unifies us. Waging war is something that is fundamentally against this spirit. Examine the lines in the poem and...

Latest answer posted July 17, 2010, 8:34 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

James Kirkup

This poem is about all men being brothers -- that all people are essentially the same. First stanza: All people are the same beneath their uniforms/clothes. All walk on the same kind of land and...

Latest answer posted November 13, 2009, 11:43 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

James Kirkup

In James Kirkup's poem "No Men Are Foreign" he writes that "attacking other humans is attacking our brothers." So, while he does not specifically refer to anyone directly, his statement implies...

Latest answer posted July 8, 2010, 2:12 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

James Kirkup

What a poem for the ages! Today, as American soldiers fight in a foreign land, the acceptance of this poem's message might stop that war and prevent other occurrences. After surviving World...

Latest answer posted July 22, 2012, 6:58 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

James Kirkup

When I read this poem I'm reminded of John Donne's "Meditation XVII." The world is interconnected in more ways than it ever has been before. We can see and hear and do business across the world...

Latest answer posted August 31, 2010, 2:13 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

James Kirkup

In reading the poem, I think that there is a definite stress to seek to eliminate the idea of boundaries that divide and set one individual or group of individuals against another. I would suggest...

Latest answer posted July 30, 2010, 4:04 am (UTC)

6 educator answers

James Kirkup

The fundamental issue here is whether or not one accepts the collective identity that Kirkup is advocating in his poem. If one does buy it, then yes, there is an emotional component to all people....

Latest answer posted July 17, 2010, 8:15 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

James Kirkup

I think that more detail would have to be given in terms of what exact guidelines are being sought to align answers. If it's the general principles of the poem, I would say that understanding the...

Latest answer posted September 5, 2010, 1:20 am (UTC)

1 educator answer