Iliad Questions and Answers

Iliad

While Achilles is sulking in his tent, he angrily prays to Zeus for the destruction of the Achaeans—his own side! Zeus won't play ball, of course, because the gods' plan involves the Trojans being...

Latest answer posted October 23, 2018 6:35 am UTC

2 educator answers

Iliad

The Achaean army is on the beaches near the city of Troy. They are currently suffering an epidemic of a mysterious deadly disease. They assume they must have somehow angered Apollo, the god of...

Latest answer posted August 28, 2018 1:23 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Iliad

One of the previous answers mentioned that Achilles is a character of great physical strength and someone that perseveres through whatever difficult situation is thrown at him. These are heroic...

Latest answer posted January 4, 2018 5:27 pm UTC

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Iliad

The relationship that Helen and Paris share in the third book reflects a condition of alienation. While conventional wisdom would suggest that Helen would be zealous in support of Paris who is out...

Latest answer posted March 25, 2014 3:39 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Iliad

Homer's poem The Iliad is consistently described as an epic poem, but does it meet those criteria? An epic is typically a very long narrative piece that follows a single hero or group of heroes,...

Latest answer posted August 17, 2019 3:01 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Iliad

Odysseus is a prominent figure in the story about his journey home after the Trojan War, The Odyssey; however, he is merely a supporting character in the Iliad by Homer. When we do see him, he is...

Latest answer posted November 26, 2013 3:55 am UTC

1 educator answer

Iliad

The gods of the Homeric epics are anthropomorphic, which means, among other things, that they behave like human beings. Given this behavior, they also choose sides and play favorites like human...

Latest answer posted July 6, 2013 6:55 pm UTC

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Iliad

Achilles is a fascinating character to explore in depth precisely because he has so many characteristics that point towards differing interpretations of his character. On the one hand, he possesses...

Latest answer posted February 22, 2013 7:17 am UTC

1 educator answer

Iliad

Pride is ultimately what's behind the wrath of Achilles, which forms the basis of much of the poem's action. Achilles is angry because Agamemnon appropriated his sex slave in order to appease the...

Latest answer posted June 14, 2019 8:20 am UTC

2 educator answers

Iliad

I think that the previous thoughts are very strong. I would add my own take on Achilles. The first word I would use to describe him is "arete," which is Greek for unparalleled excellence. Usually...

Latest answer posted April 25, 2010 8:04 am UTC

2 educator answers

Iliad

Achilles's shield depicts all the modes of life. Love, death, war, peace, farming and festivals, sieges and battles—everything is represented on the shield, which Achilles both uses to protect...

Latest answer posted March 8, 2018 3:14 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Iliad

Homer's world is very different than our world. This might be an obvious statement, but it is a necessary point to make. In Homer's world, certain characteristics were valued like courage, honor,...

Latest answer posted December 2, 2009 12:34 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Iliad

In Homer's Iliad, Patroclus is the best friend of Achilles, who is the mightiest of the Greek warriors at Troy. In Iliad 1, Achilles becomes angry at Agamemnon for taking away his female war prize,...

Latest answer posted November 12, 2011 12:41 am UTC

1 educator answer

Iliad

Justice in Homer is of a fairly primitive variety, based on customs of retribution and recompense. Response to what is seen as injustice can result in a demand for immediate compensation, as in the...

Latest answer posted September 2, 2017 6:59 pm UTC

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Iliad

After sacking a Trojan-allied town, Agamemnon and Achilles, as is customary, help themselves to the spoils of war. Both men capture beautiful young women as war booty: Achilles takes Briseis, while...

Latest answer posted January 31, 2021 10:59 am UTC

1 educator answer

Iliad

The gods and goddesses in The Iliad act out of self-interest and sometimes pettiness, which makes them very much like mortal humans. With a few exceptions such as Zeus, the deities take sides in...

Latest answer posted October 23, 2018 10:32 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Iliad

The theme of man's mortality is introduced immediately into the poem in its opening lines: Rage--Goddess, sing the rage of Peleus son Achilles, murderous, doomed, that cost the Achaceans'...

Latest answer posted March 28, 2011 2:48 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Iliad

To compare the Iliad and the Odyssey is to see immediately that the former poem presents one very difficult problem for the poet. The Odyssey has inbuilt variety. Odysseus is constantly traveling...

Latest answer posted December 17, 2019 7:14 am UTC

3 educator answers

Iliad

Achilles is a fascinating character to consider by the 21st century standards of what constitutes a hero. He is clearly presented as something of a superhero with amazing strength and as somebody...

Latest answer posted February 22, 2013 7:08 am UTC

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Iliad

The rage of Achilles is a central theme in the Iliad. Homer begins the story by asking the muse to tell him the story--not of the Trojan War--but of Achilles' rage. Rage - Goddess, sing the rage...

Latest answer posted September 13, 2016 9:32 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Iliad

Achilles and Hector are both the greatest warriors of their respective camps, the Greeks and the Trojans. When it comes to their personalities, they could not be more different. Achilles is quick...

Latest answer posted September 14, 2020 11:43 am UTC

4 educator answers

Iliad

This is such a great question! To understand Hector’s motivations for being a great warrior in Homer’s Iliad you might look closer at understanding the culture of the times, and what it meant for...

Latest answer posted February 26, 2019 7:31 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Iliad

The rivalry between Achilles and Agamemnon in Homer's Iliad has two causes, one indirect and one direct. The indirect cause has to do with the agonistic nature of oral traditional society, in...

Latest answer posted August 21, 2015 8:41 am UTC

1 educator answer

Iliad

The Iliad can be understood on one level as an extended meditation on war. The moral message is that the courage to fight is what gives a man's life worth, but that war itself is a tragic...

Latest answer posted January 22, 2021 1:12 pm UTC

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Iliad

As the previous answer notes, The Iliad contains much more than just the wrath of Achilles, including the stories of individual Greek warrior-kings--Agamemnon, Menelaus, Nestor, Odysseus, Diomedes,...

Latest answer posted February 21, 2016 3:30 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Iliad

The Iliad and The Epic of Gilgamesh both belong to a conversation on ancient literature and, to varying degrees, to a conversation on myth narratives. Yet one is more fully "mythological" than the...

Latest answer posted September 23, 2017 8:02 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Iliad

In book 6, Hector is about to leave for battle with the Greeks. He is saying goodbye to his wife and says the following prayer over his infant son, Astyanax: Then he took his darling child, kissed...

Latest answer posted July 2, 2019 12:57 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Iliad

To offer supplications to a god is to pray to them and ask for favors. The Trojan women are terrified and turning to Athena, the goddess of wisdom, for protection against the invading Greeks. In...

Latest answer posted September 8, 2020 11:38 am UTC

4 educator answers

Iliad

This question is interesting, because it seems to focus alone on the positive achievements of Achilles, which is slightly difficult, as he is a character who throughout this text is associated with...

Latest answer posted March 4, 2013 6:43 am UTC

1 educator answer

Iliad

Homer's Iliad takes as its setting the shore near the "high-walled" city of Troy (also known as Ilion). The epic opens at the Greek encampment on that shore ("the shore by the tumbling, crashing...

Latest answer posted November 24, 2011 11:47 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Iliad

Both Achilles and Oedipus are brave leaders who suffer from the tragic flaw of pride. In both cases, this flaw endangers their country. Achilles, a great warrior, gets angry and refuses to fight...

Latest answer posted July 24, 2018 7:56 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Iliad

The envoys are sent to Achilles in Book 9 of The Iliad on behalf of King Agamemnon, in the hope that they will be able to persuade Achilles to return and continue fighting. At this point in the...

Latest answer posted September 26, 2017 10:48 am UTC

2 educator answers

Iliad

Like so much of the story of the Iliad, the war between the Greeks and the Trojans has causes on two levels -- that of men and that of the gods. "The Iliad begins with the topic of wrath. Homer...

Latest answer posted July 5, 2015 6:23 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Iliad

This is a great question. One of the most interesting points about Homer's Iliad is how infrequent Helen is mentioned. In fact, Helen appears only six times in the epic, and four of these times are...

Latest answer posted December 29, 2011 9:02 am UTC

1 educator answer

Iliad

Patroclus is a very close friend to Achilles. Their relationship plays a critical role in shaping how The Iliad plays out. In the beginning of this epic poem, Achilles falls into a dispute with...

Latest answer posted June 15, 2019 2:05 am UTC

3 educator answers

Iliad

I think that there is a very interesting dynamic between Hector and Helen. Both of them represent opposite ends of the source of action. Helen's presence in the drama is the result of Paris'...

Latest answer posted December 27, 2010 6:16 am UTC

1 educator answer

Iliad

In Book 16 of the Iliad, Achilles prays that two things will return safely from battle: his dear friend Patroclus and the Greek ships. Zeus decides he will only grant one of these requests. As the...

Latest answer posted September 10, 2018 5:55 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Iliad

The Mahabharata and the Ramayana are both much longer than the Iliad. The Mahabharata, the longer of the two, is approximately twenty times the length of Homer's epic. Moreover, while it seems...

Latest answer posted December 31, 2019 3:19 am UTC

1 educator answer

Iliad

Respect and disrespect are major themes in Homer's Iliad. The reason for Achilles' wrath is due to the disrespect shown to him by Agamemnon in Iliad I. When Agamemnon forces Achilles to hand over...

Latest answer posted July 6, 2013 7:20 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Iliad

Hector and Achilles are both great warriors. They both fight hard and long for the glory of their nation. They both rally their troops to battle and play a key role in the war. Of course, Hector...

Latest answer posted October 17, 2011 6:57 am UTC

1 educator answer

Iliad

The greatest warrior in Homer's The Iliad is Achilles, and he has many character flaws that lead to his tragic death. At birth, Achilles was dipped in the River Styx which should have made him...

Latest answer posted September 18, 2010 8:20 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Iliad

When Achilles feels himself insulted by Agamemnon over the allocation of the war prize, he is ambivalent about whether he should kill Agamemnon or restrain his rage: Grief came upon the son of...

Latest answer posted August 9, 2012 5:38 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Iliad

In the Iliad, Zeus is conspiring with Achilles and helping the Trojans, essentially trying to aid in the destruction of the Greeks. Early in the poem, Achilles prays to his mother, asking her to...

Latest answer posted July 16, 2019 7:58 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Iliad

The most famous description of Hector's death occurs in Book 22 of Homer's Iliad. In this book, Achilles, having reconciled his quarrel with Agamemnon, returns to the fighting and is intent on...

Latest answer posted November 11, 2011 2:19 am UTC

1 educator answer

Iliad

Achilles is in a state of high dudgeon. He feels that his honor has been impugned by Agamemnon, king of Mycenae. Agamemnon has appropriated Briseis, Achilles's comely concubine, in compensation for...

Latest answer posted November 9, 2017 10:06 am UTC

1 educator answer

Iliad

As he heads off out to battle, Hector knows what's at stake. If Troy should fall, then all the men will be wiped out and the women and children sold into slavery. As Hector has a wife and son, he's...

Latest answer posted October 18, 2020 11:02 am UTC

4 educator answers

Iliad

The Trojan War began after the Trojan Paris abducted a Greek woman, Helen, whose husband was Menelaus. Despite Paris' role in starting the war, he is mentioned comparatively infrequently in Homer's...

Latest answer posted November 27, 2011 11:16 am UTC

1 educator answer

Iliad

Modern students can learn several things about the ancient world, as well as enduring human issues, from the movie Troy. The first issue, which appears as the central element in the movie, is the...

Latest answer posted April 22, 2019 12:10 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Iliad

This is an interesting question, in that I've not heard it considered before, and, on the surface, the two heroes have little in common. Let's examine if the two legendary characters (for we have...

Latest answer posted January 19, 2010 6:51 am UTC

1 educator answer

Iliad

This is a very good question and you would think that the Iliad would address this question at greater length, being that this was the causus belli of the Trojan and Greek conflict. However, if you...

Latest answer posted December 30, 2011 8:44 am UTC

1 educator answer

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