I, Too Questions and Answers

I, Too

The main theme of Langston Hughes's "I, Too" is racism. More specifically, the poem deals with the lines that are drawn between Black and white people in the United States, which seem to disregard...

Latest answer posted March 22, 2021 12:55 pm UTC

4 educator answers

I, Too

In "I, Too," Langston Hughes is obviously in conversation with the earlier poem, Walt Whitman's "I Hear America Singing." Both poems explore the idea of American identity -- who and what is an...

Latest answer posted January 22, 2016 4:26 pm UTC

3 educator answers

I, Too

First, Whitman's poem describes many different types of Americans, with varied jobs and responsibilities: mechanics, carpenters, masons, boatmen, shoemakers, wood-cutters, mothers, wives, and young...

Latest answer posted March 14, 2020 5:00 pm UTC

3 educator answers

I, Too

The tone of "I, Too" could be classified as resilient. The speaker of this poem is the "darker brother," referencing the Black experience in America. Hughes points to the segregation in America,...

Latest answer posted March 19, 2021 11:09 am UTC

4 educator answers

I, Too

Two words that help set the tone in Langston Hughes’s poem, “I, Too,” are “sing” and “America.” Usually, if someone sings something, they praise or celebrate it. Yet in this poem, Hughes flips that...

Latest answer posted May 10, 2021 2:35 pm UTC

4 educator answers

I, Too

Langston Hughes wrote the poem “I, Too,” forty-five years before Dr. Martin Luther King spoke the words: “I have a dream that my four children will one day live in a nation where they will not be...

Latest answer posted January 6, 2013 2:20 am UTC

1 educator answer

I, Too

One very important literary device at work in Langston Hughes's "I, Too, Sing America" is an allusion to another famous poem: Walt Whitman's "I Hear America Singing." Understanding this allusion...

Latest answer posted February 1, 2018 3:25 am UTC

2 educator answers

I, Too

In the poem "I, Too, Sing America," by Langston Hughes, the speaker confidently foretells of a future for black Americans where they will be treated equally and recognized as beautiful. He does...

Latest answer posted February 27, 2018 2:00 am UTC

3 educator answers

I, Too

Because of the second line of the poem, "I am the darker brother," I think the message of this poem most closely and specifically relates to the dream of racial equality, rather than the American...

Latest answer posted March 14, 2019 7:38 pm UTC

2 educator answers

I, Too

The poem seems to be spoken by a black man, an idea which is introduced by the direct declaration that "I am the darker brother." This, in conjunction with the opening line "I, too, sing America,"...

Latest answer posted September 25, 2018 1:24 am UTC

1 educator answer

I, Too

The speaker in Hughes' poem expresses disappointment that because of race, he is not accepted in American society. The poem is an allusion to Walt Whitman's "I Hear America Singing" in which he...

Latest answer posted March 31, 2012 2:29 am UTC

1 educator answer

I, Too

"I, Too" is a poem written by Langston Hughes that was first published in 1925. In order to help you decide which line best sums up the main theme of the poem, it is important to consider what the...

Latest answer posted June 19, 2020 4:37 pm UTC

1 educator answer

I, Too

Both “I, Too” by Langston Hughes and “A Litany for Survival” by Audre Lorde reflect on the inferior position of African Americans in society. Hughes uses the image of being sent “to eat in the...

Latest answer posted August 14, 2020 8:41 pm UTC

1 educator answer

I, Too

When the speaker claims to be "the darker brother," it is ironic because one would likely not think to treat their brother in the way that he is treated by white people. He compares himself to...

Latest answer posted March 6, 2020 1:09 pm UTC

1 educator answer

I, Too

The historical context is important to decipher the true subject of this poem. Hughes published this poem during the Harlem Renaissance, long before the Civil Rights Movement. During this time, Jim...

Latest answer posted April 4, 2020 11:51 pm UTC

1 educator answer

I, Too

The literal or explicit meaning of a text is simply the story that is described. This poem literally describes a black man (the speaker) who is mistreated and insists that he will not continue to...

Latest answer posted August 10, 2019 7:08 am UTC

1 educator answer

I, Too

At face value, Hughes's "I, Too, Sing America" reads as an outright response to Whitman's "I Hear America Singing." In the earlier poem, Whitman celebrates American society, in particular its...

Latest answer posted September 7, 2019 5:47 am UTC

1 educator answer

I, Too

Claude McKay and Langston Hughes were contemporaries, and, accordingly, their poems represent similar concerns. Both men were black and living in the United States in the 1920s. However, while...

Latest answer posted February 7, 2018 9:16 pm UTC

2 educator answers

I, Too

Langston Hughes seem to write this poem in direct engagement with Walt Whitman's "I Hear America Singing," and the polyvocal larger work Leaves of Grass. Whitman sought to be the bard of America,...

Latest answer posted January 31, 2019 5:37 pm UTC

2 educator answers

I, Too

In the years near the turn of the 19th to the 20th century, there was a basic disagreement among African-American leaders. Some leaders, particularly Booker T. Washington, felt that...

Latest answer posted February 27, 2011 10:56 am UTC

1 educator answer

I, Too

The primary device that Langston Hughes employs in "I, Too" is allusion: a reference to another work of art. Hughes's opening line, "I, too, sing America," is an allusion to Walt Whitman's famous...

Latest answer posted December 8, 2010 7:29 am UTC

1 educator answer

I, Too

I have always read Hughes' poem as a type of response to one of his favorite authors', Walt Whitman. Whitman's poem of "I Hear America Singing," is one thast stresses the greatness and promises of...

Latest answer posted November 16, 2010 7:00 pm UTC

1 educator answer

I, Too

Orature is defined as a body of poetry having roots in oral tradition, extending back in time to a period in history possibly before verse was written down. In this poem, it's seems that Hughes is...

Latest answer posted August 27, 2021 3:50 am UTC

1 educator answer

I, Too

This poem is talking about racism and how being belittled on the basis of race builds character and makes one not only strong enough to take it, but strong enough to overcome it. The second...

Latest answer posted August 16, 2019 8:12 pm UTC

1 educator answer

I, Too

This important poem by Hughes is in response to Whitman's "I Hear America Singing." It is in reference to the African American plight before the Civil Rights movement (circa the Harlem...

Latest answer posted October 13, 2010 7:20 am UTC

1 educator answer

I, Too

Whitman's "I Sing of America" is the poem in which Hughes' work provides a wonderful complement. In Whitman's work, there is an extolling of the diverse nature of American society. Its...

Latest answer posted April 17, 2010 1:38 am UTC

2 educator answers

I, Too

Langston Hughes' "I, Too," was first published in 1926. At this time, black Americans were systematically persecuted and oppressed. Black Americans were stereotypically portrayed as slavish,...

Latest answer posted January 1, 2020 12:00 pm UTC

1 educator answer

I, Too

For an answer to this question, please see the following link: http://www.enotes.com/langston-hughes/q-and-a/the-poem-too-replaying-whitmans-hear-america-158399

Latest answer posted July 31, 2011 2:10 pm UTC

1 educator answer

I, Too

The speaker of the poem is an African American who is figuratively forced to "eat in the kitchen"—treated like a second-class citizen, someone who really does not have a chance to achieve the...

Latest answer posted April 22, 2020 2:44 am UTC

1 educator answer