To His Coy Mistress Questions and Answers

To His Coy Mistress

The speaker in Andrew Marvell's "To His Coy Mistress" makes three arguments to convince his lady to cavort with him: he is in love with her, time is fleeting, and her beauty will fade. The first...

Latest answer posted December 31, 2019, 7:23 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

To His Coy Mistress

Metaphors are common in both literature and day-to-day conversation, as they help us to grasp abstract concepts. The most common metaphors are sometimes called conceptual metaphors; they are so...

Latest answer posted March 23, 2021, 11:27 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

To His Coy Mistress

Carpe diem is Latin for "seize the day." This was a popular theme in seventeenth-century poetry, as this was a time of uncertainty and upheaval in England. "Seize the day" means grab your pleasures...

Latest answer posted December 24, 2020, 10:58 am (UTC)

4 educator answers

To His Coy Mistress

"To His Coy Mistress" employs a device called apostrophe, which is when a speaker addresses a specific person or figure who is absent and thus who does not respond. The speaker directly addresses...

Latest answer posted March 23, 2021, 11:23 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

To His Coy Mistress

In the first two lines, we find the poem's first example of hyperbole, or overstatement. The speaker says, Had we but world enough and time,This coyness, lady, were no crime. The speaker implies...

Latest answer posted April 5, 2018, 10:59 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

To His Coy Mistress

The speaker in "To His Coy Mistress" is trying to persuade the woman he's addressing to stop being coy—meaning specifically that she should stop being shy about sex. Even more specifically, he...

Latest answer posted May 6, 2019, 9:54 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

To His Coy Mistress

Marvell's narrator uses three methods: humor through hyperbole, fear through imagery of death, and finally, imagery about the fierce pleasures of sex to try to persuade his beloved to make love to...

Latest answer posted March 6, 2018, 11:21 am (UTC)

3 educator answers

To His Coy Mistress

If the speaker in Andrew Marvell's “To His Coy Mistress” had all the time and space in the world, then he wouldn't fuss so much about the coyness of his lady. If they could sit by the Ganges and...

Latest answer posted April 18, 2021, 12:14 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

To His Coy Mistress

The central idea in Andrew Marvell's poem "To His Coy Mistress" is that the two lovers have only a little time in which to enjoy their love. The first part of the poem is taken up with the...

Latest answer posted March 23, 2021, 4:07 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

To His Coy Mistress

What the speaker is saying in these lines, the first two of the poem, is that he and the young woman he wants to sleep with do not have all the time in the world. She is, evidently, rebuffing his...

Latest answer posted March 24, 2021, 11:14 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

To His Coy Mistress

In “To His Coy Mistress,” Andrew Marvell's speaker implores his eponymous beloved to make love to him. Late in the poem, he makes the following entreaty: Let us roll all our strength and all Our...

Latest answer posted March 25, 2021, 12:25 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

To His Coy Mistress

In "To His Coy Mistress," the speaker is trying to convince a woman to have sex with him. The speaker's main argument seems to be that the woman needs to take advantage of her youth and beauty...

Latest answer posted March 26, 2021, 11:22 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

To His Coy Mistress

"Marvell Noir" is a humorous poem by Ann Lauigner that, like Marvell's "To His Coy Mistress," emphasizes the self-interested nature of men in their relationships with women, but it has a modern,...

Latest answer posted January 4, 2018, 1:35 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

To His Coy Mistress

The speaker says that he always hears "Time's winged chariot hurrying near" (line 22). In this line, time is personified as someone driving a fleet and fast-moving vehicle, signifying how quickly...

Latest answer posted March 24, 2021, 11:26 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

To His Coy Mistress

"To His Coy Mistress" was written by the English poet Andrew Marvell and was originally published in 1681, three years after Marvell's death. It is often presented as a three-stanza poem; however,...

Latest answer posted March 26, 2021, 12:56 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

To His Coy Mistress

Time is personified in the poem—meaning it is given human attributes such as the ability to drive a chariot or to purposely pursue us to our deaths. The speaker says that "Time's winged chariot...

Latest answer posted December 13, 2019, 8:46 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

To His Coy Mistress

In "To His Coy Mistress," Andrew Marvell tells the addressee that when she is dead, her "quaint honour" will turn to dust. A woman's honor was closely associated with her chastity, and reputation...

Latest answer posted March 26, 2021, 11:26 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

To His Coy Mistress

A syllogism is a form of logic in which a conclusion appears to be logically derived from two axiomatic propositions. For example, if one proposition is that airplanes contribute to global warming...

Latest answer posted September 26, 2019, 2:57 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

To His Coy Mistress

Chapped meant "jawed" in seventeenth-century English. "Slow-chapped" therefore means slow-jawed. Marvell's meaning becomes clearer if we look at what he says in context: Rather at once our time...

Latest answer posted March 26, 2021, 11:36 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

To His Coy Mistress

In the poem “To His Coy Mistress,” Andrew Marvell uses the sun as a figure of speech—a metonym—to represent the abstract concept of time. The sun's connection to time recurs in several places...

Latest answer posted March 24, 2021, 2:23 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

To His Coy Mistress

The basic argument of this poem is that if time were limitless, the woman's coyness would not matter. She keeps putting off the narrator of the poem, but the narrator argues that her coyness is...

Latest answer posted February 4, 2018, 4:09 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

To His Coy Mistress

Here are some additional literary devices in this poem: Repetition As the speaker addresses this woman who has captivated him, he wants her to believe that she should be intimate with him—and now....

Latest answer posted December 30, 2019, 3:51 am (UTC)

3 educator answers

To His Coy Mistress

You have correctly identified a key turning point in the poem. Remember what this poem is all about: the speaker is trying to persuade his audience to love him now and not to be "coy." The speaker...

Latest answer posted September 24, 2010, 9:57 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

To His Coy Mistress

Yes, the poem is a satire. Satire often uses exaggeration or hyperbole to poke fun at a weakness or foible in a person or society. In this poem, Marvell use hyperbole to poke fun at a woman who...

Latest answer posted April 7, 2019, 12:54 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

To His Coy Mistress

Andrew Marvell's "To His Coy Mistress" is famous for its proposition that one must find love during the brief extent of youth, as humans are finite creatures and are not blessed with infinite...

Latest answer posted June 15, 2016, 5:26 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

To His Coy Mistress

Poetic meter is the rhythm of poetry. To determine meter, we look at two things: the number of syllables and the way certain syllables are stressed within each line. Often, those stressed syllables...

Latest answer posted March 26, 2021, 4:20 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

To His Coy Mistress

"To His Coy Mistress", by 17th century English poet, Andrew Marvell, is a notable example of metaphysical poetry, a type characterized by among other traits, startling, fanciful metaphors and...

Latest answer posted September 30, 2010, 5:29 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

To His Coy Mistress

Marvell actually directly provides the answers to these questions in his poem: it can be divided into "if," "then," "but," and "therefore" sections, except that he has used different words to...

Latest answer posted March 15, 2018, 4:43 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

To His Coy Mistress

In Marvell's poem, "To His Coy Mistress," excess used in the imagery present makes it very hard to find understatment. The author's continued use of hyperbole—extremes, exaggeration— leaves one...

Latest answer posted October 7, 2010, 12:59 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

To His Coy Mistress

In "To His Coy Mistress," the poem's narrator is trying to persuade his girlfriend to have sex with him. He does this by using the carpe diem or "seize the day" theme, saying to her that they don't...

Latest answer posted March 14, 2016, 5:11 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

To His Coy Mistress

In Marvell's poem, "To His Coy Mistress," the tone may be humorous in that it expresses the speaker's impatience. The theme of the poem is based upon its first two lines: Had we but world enough,...

Latest answer posted October 25, 2012, 9:21 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

To His Coy Mistress

I think to answer this question you need to remember what this poem is all about: the speaker is trying to persuade his audience to love him now and not to be "coy." The speaker dwells on the...

Latest answer posted October 2, 2010, 3:32 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

To His Coy Mistress

The speaker in "To His Coy Mistress" employs wit in an attempt to convince his unnamed lady to engage in sexual relations with him. His message is seen as a carpe diem ("Seize the day") poem,...

Latest answer posted April 14, 2020, 1:26 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

To His Coy Mistress

I believe that the author using personification to make his arguments more persuasive by making the objects he personifies seem alive—imbuing them with human characteristics...as he tries to make...

Latest answer posted October 7, 2010, 12:39 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

To His Coy Mistress

My 2 cents: in Marvell's time, the idea of "seizing the day" may have seemed more pressing than it does today, partly because lives then tended to me much shorter (and nastier and more brutish)...

Latest answer posted September 5, 2011, 3:20 pm (UTC)

9 educator answers

To His Coy Mistress

Critics have been divided as to whether the supposed fallacies in Andrew Marvell's logic were actually deliberate, or simply a failure on his part. A syllogism is a type of reasoning in which two...

Latest answer posted August 6, 2018, 8:51 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

To His Coy Mistress

I am so glad to learn that this wonderful poem is still being taught! The speaker in the poem is an older man trying to seduce a younger woman. This sounds a bit creepy today, but in Marvell's...

Latest answer posted September 18, 2009, 12:21 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

To His Coy Mistress

This poem is a witty example of carpe diem style--seize the day for tomorrow will be a different story! The poem begins with the speaker praising the lady's beauty,and he tells her how much time he...

Latest answer posted February 27, 2009, 3:22 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

To His Coy Mistress

In this "carpe diem" poem, Marvell presents time as the enemy of the young couple, personifying him as one whose "slow-chapped power" can ultimately defeat them unless they make the decision to...

Latest answer posted January 2, 2019, 9:38 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

To His Coy Mistress

[eNotes editors are only allowed to answer one question per posting. For additional postings, please post them separately.] In Andrew Marvell's poem, "To His Coy Mistress," there are three...

Latest answer posted February 20, 2011, 6:35 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

To His Coy Mistress

A poem that springs immediately to mind, of roughly the same period, is "To the Virgins, To Make Much of Time" by Robert Herrick. The message of both poems is the same -- there is not very much...

Latest answer posted March 15, 2009, 12:33 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

To His Coy Mistress

Carpe diem means to "seize the day." The speaker in "To His Coy Mistress" is trying to persuade his lover to stop postponing sexual intimacy in their relationship because The grave's a fine and...

Latest answer posted October 30, 2009, 12:49 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

To His Coy Mistress

In his poem, "To His Coy Mistress," Marvell attempts to persuade the eponymous mistress to give up "that long-preserved virginity" on account of the fact that, eventually, her "beauty shall no more...

Latest answer posted February 12, 2018, 9:40 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

To His Coy Mistress

Andrew Marvell's "To His Coy Mistress" is a perfect example of a poem that exemplifies the meaning of carpe diem simply because the speaker of the poem is imploring the audience to seize the...

Latest answer posted March 6, 2019, 5:08 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

To His Coy Mistress

Both of these poems address a similar theme: that time is fleeting, and that the beauty of young women will only last for a certain space. Both poems encourage young women not to prize their...

Latest answer posted March 22, 2019, 9:36 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

To His Coy Mistress

First of all, to make sure we are on the same page, I define metaphysical conceit as an attitude that is expressed through a rhetorical argument, like a thesis while using striking or unusual...

Latest answer posted October 22, 2010, 5:27 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

To His Coy Mistress

Time is central to this metaphysical poem of Andrew Marvell, who uses systematic reasoning in his poetic efforts to convince his lady love that they must carpe diem, or seize the moment. The...

Latest answer posted February 20, 2014, 10:59 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

To His Coy Mistress

The message of "To His Coy Mistress" is that life is short, time moves quickly, and thus that the speaker and his beloved should make love now. The speaker declares that if they had limitless time,...

Latest answer posted March 23, 2021, 11:10 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

To His Coy Mistress

Firstly, the speaker in the poem uses flattery to try and seduce the "coy mistress." He says that he would spend thousands of years praising her if he could, and that she would "deserve this...

Latest answer posted May 11, 2019, 1:28 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

To His Coy Mistress

I had to edit your original question because it contained more than one question. Please remember that enotes does not permit you to ask multiple questions. I personally think that the ending of...

Latest answer posted March 14, 2011, 3:26 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

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