Hills Like White Elephants Questions and Answers

Hills Like White Elephants

In Hemingway's story the dialogue goes like this: "They look like white elephants," she said. "I've never seen one," the man drank his beer. "No, you wouldn't have." There is a great deal of...

Latest answer posted January 26, 2012 10:08 am UTC

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Hills Like White Elephants

There are two observations about this question that are worth making before attempting to answer it. The first is that Hemingway would certainly have been very resistant to the way of reading his...

Latest answer posted May 10, 2020 2:22 am UTC

2 educator answers

Hills Like White Elephants

Hemingway uses the setting as a metaphor for the couple's relationship. What the setting tells us is that, while both parts of the view are part of the same landscape, the parts are are divided...

Latest answer posted November 13, 2011 10:33 am UTC

1 educator answer

Hills Like White Elephants

I would argue that the first clue we are given by Hemingway is when Jig and her partner begin to talk after their drinks are brought to them and Jig makes the comparison that gives the story its...

Latest answer posted January 25, 2012 2:12 pm UTC

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Hills Like White Elephants

For my part, I don't necessarily see the use of language such as "girl" or "woman" to indicate anything unusual about the age difference in the couple. I think that there probably is an age...

Latest answer posted January 23, 2012 7:00 pm UTC

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Hills Like White Elephants

‘If I do it you won’t ever worry?’‘I won’t worry about that because it’s perfectly simple.’‘Then I’ll do it. Because I don’t care about me.’‘What do you mean?’‘I don’t care about me.’‘Well, I care...

Latest answer posted October 19, 2011 1:42 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Hills Like White Elephants

This is a tough question on a couple of levels. The first is that any discussion of a central issue of the short story remains unfulfilled because Hemingway does not render much in way of absolute...

Latest answer posted January 26, 2012 6:34 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Hills Like White Elephants

The man and woman in the story are going to Madrid in order for her to have an abortion. This becomes apparent in the dialogue because the man keeps trying to reassure her that it will be a very...

Latest answer posted January 27, 2012 3:35 am UTC

1 educator answer

Hills Like White Elephants

By saying that the train will come in forty minutes, Hemingway is creatinig a certain amount of dramatic tension. The issue between the man and woman has to be resolved in forty minutes. He wants...

Latest answer posted January 23, 2012 8:10 am UTC

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Hills Like White Elephants

The hills in "Hills Like White Elephants" are an area of raised ground which is symbolic of the raised stomach of the pregnant woman. They are also described with more vitality than the surrounding...

Latest answer posted September 4, 2012 6:59 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Hills Like White Elephants

The point of view used in this story is the third-person objective. This means that the narrator is neither a participant in the story's events nor does he or she tell us what any of the characters...

Latest answer posted March 6, 2019 3:46 pm UTC

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Hills Like White Elephants

Keep in mind the era in which the story was written: the 1920s. Social mores were much more conservative then, and there was little public or private aid for unwed pregnant women or single mothers....

Latest answer posted February 28, 2008 12:42 pm UTC

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Hills Like White Elephants

In Ernest Hemingway's short story Hills Like White Elephants, one of the protagonists of the story, Jig, asks her boyfriend a seemingly simplistic question. Jig wishes to know what will happen...

Latest answer posted January 25, 2012 10:08 am UTC

1 educator answer

Hills Like White Elephants

A good example of Jig's sarcasm occurs when the American tells her, "You don't have to be afraid. I've known lots of people that have done it." "So have I," said the girl. "And afterward they were...

Latest answer posted March 27, 2012 9:18 am UTC

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Hills Like White Elephants

To assess the contemporary relevancy of the short story "Hills Like White Elephants" by Ernest Hemingway, it is important to understand what the story is really about. A couple is sitting at a...

Latest answer posted November 27, 2020 1:30 am UTC

1 educator answer

Hills Like White Elephants

It is the man who says, "That's the way with everything." There are a lot of "he saids" and "she saids" left out of the dialogue because Hemingway characteristically did not want to explain what...

Latest answer posted May 6, 2012 12:20 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Hills Like White Elephants

A white elephant is an idiom for something that is expensive or costly to the owner; this owner is burdened with it and cannot sell or rid himself of it. In Ernest Hemingway's short story, "Hills...

Latest answer posted July 27, 2010 1:17 am UTC

1 educator answer

Hills Like White Elephants

The short story "Hills Like White Elephants" by Ernest Hemingway is classically understated. Most of it seems to be a quiet discussion between a man and a woman waiting at a station in the Ebro...

Latest answer posted May 28, 2020 1:30 am UTC

1 educator answer

Hills Like White Elephants

In a sense, I suppose we could argue that the statement above might be a form of both. If we knew more, it might be dramatic irony because we would be aware of what Jig and her partner are talking...

Latest answer posted June 20, 2011 2:18 am UTC

1 educator answer

Hills Like White Elephants

The proper solution for the problem would be for the two people to get married and have the baby. Evidently they are not married at the time of the story. The man is selfish and afraid of giving up...

Latest answer posted January 15, 2012 11:08 am UTC

3 educator answers

Hills Like White Elephants

Simple, direct language is used to create a detached narrative tone by: avoiding emotionality providing an anonymous narrator creating a surface sense of objectivity Hemingway's choices in diction...

Latest answer posted December 16, 2012 7:44 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Hills Like White Elephants

The time period and the cultural context go well with the physical location of the story. The narrative takes place in a train station, and the characters are in a state of transition. They are...

Latest answer posted May 30, 2018 2:08 am UTC

1 educator answer

Hills Like White Elephants

I cannot see anything particularly admirable about Mrs. Mooney. It seems to me that James Joyce wanted to portray her as a vulgar woman who used her naive daughter to entrap Bob Doran into...

Latest answer posted October 16, 2013 10:32 pm UTC

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Hills Like White Elephants

In this story, a man, the American, has a conversation with his girlfriend Jig, who is pregnant. He wants her to have an abortion. She does not, seeing the possibility inherent having a baby. The...

Latest answer posted June 15, 2017 12:14 pm UTC

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Hills Like White Elephants

Perhaps one of the most important elements of conflict which has not been suggested by the answer above is the way in which the title suggests a larger conflict. It seems that there is a conflict...

Latest answer posted April 18, 2011 8:14 pm UTC

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Hills Like White Elephants

The two people seem to be in the middle of nowhere. The hot, barren setting with the bleached mountains in the background is nearly surrealistic. This is a junction. They are waiting to transfer to...

Latest answer posted October 6, 2015 3:53 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Hills Like White Elephants

Your question is "Why is it so hard to figure out what this story is about?" It is hard to figure out because Hemingway wrote at least some of his stories in what is often described as a...

Latest answer posted July 10, 2012 11:45 am UTC

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Hills Like White Elephants

The best thing about the short film adaptation of Hemingway's "Hills Like White Elephants" written by Joan Dideon and John Gregory Dunn was the cinematography. The twin railroad tracks with the...

Latest answer posted July 8, 2012 1:35 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Hills Like White Elephants

I think all authors can be considered reliable. They may sometimes use a narrator who is or is not reliable. But in "Hills Like White Elephants," Hemingway is not using a fictitious narrator; he is...

Latest answer posted January 23, 2012 7:57 am UTC

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Hills Like White Elephants

Hemingway's code hero is a man who could be identified as a man's man. He likes to drink, have affairs with women, engage in physical activities such as hunting or fishing. He is stoic and...

Latest answer posted July 17, 2016 2:35 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Hills Like White Elephants

One of the highly fascinating aspects of this story is that what is going on between Jig and her lover is only alluded two once during the story and then not referred to again. However, it is...

Latest answer posted January 17, 2011 6:41 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Hills Like White Elephants

It's important to note the difference between verbal irony and sarcasm (which is always verbal). The primary difference is that sarcasm is wilfully intended to injure the person being addressed....

Latest answer posted June 30, 2012 7:08 pm UTC

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Hills Like White Elephants

It is with dialogue and setting that the minimalist Ernest Hemingway skillfully creates his powerful tale of two people together, yet separated ideologically. For instance, with her perception of...

Latest answer posted September 9, 2011 6:26 pm UTC

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Hills Like White Elephants

The central symbol in "Hills Like White Elephants" is the setting, with the hills in the distance. One side of the train station in Spain is covered with vegetation and fertile while the other side...

Latest answer posted July 22, 2010 2:09 am UTC

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Hills Like White Elephants

As "Hills Like White Elephants" progresses, Jig becomes more aware that "the American" does not want to be in a relationship with her if she has their baby. She tries to convince him that their...

Latest answer posted September 27, 2010 6:32 am UTC

1 educator answer

Hills Like White Elephants

The dialogue in "Hills Like White Elephants" is almost as short as the phrase, "The elephant in the room." The dialogue is short and to the point but actually does not provide much information in...

Latest answer posted November 5, 2009 10:50 am UTC

1 educator answer

Hills Like White Elephants

One of the objectives of Hemingway's style of minimalist writing is to open the truth of subjects up to thoughtful contemplation. For this reason, his narrators are objective though sympathetic and...

Latest answer posted June 30, 2012 6:02 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Hills Like White Elephants

The characters refrain explicit discussion of the operation, aside from the man's brief discussion of it, mainly because it is an ongoing discussion, one the details of which they are both well...

Latest answer posted July 22, 2010 2:30 am UTC

1 educator answer

Hills Like White Elephants

Gender roles aside, another major common theme between the three stories is the correlation between death and the happiness of female characters. "Hills Like White Elephants" contains a debate...

Latest answer posted December 20, 2018 12:48 am UTC

2 educator answers

Hills Like White Elephants

The American man in Hemingway's "Hills Like White Elephants" is very similar in character to Bill in Brewer's "20/20." In both stories, the men are seen with their partners sharing relatively...

Latest answer posted July 5, 2010 3:29 am UTC

1 educator answer

Hills Like White Elephants

One of the most telling clues that the operation is an abortion comes toward the end when the man says, "You've got to realize that I don't want you to do it if you don't want to. I'm perfectly...

Latest answer posted June 21, 2010 7:12 am UTC

2 educator answers

Hills Like White Elephants

When Jig suggests that "we can have everything"? she is actually implying that, in fact, they cannot have everything and that the American is ignoring the fact that they must make difficult...

Latest answer posted January 25, 2012 11:34 am UTC

1 educator answer

Hills Like White Elephants

You have identified a key aspect to Hemmingway's tone in writing that is very distinctive. Certainly his detached tone is incredibly important in this story, as part of its sheer brilliance is the...

Latest answer posted December 10, 2010 4:27 am UTC

1 educator answer

Hills Like White Elephants

In "Hills Like White Elephants," Hemingway uses a symbolic physical landscape that represents an unplanned, unborn child. A young traveling couple—Jig the girl and an unnamed American man—stop for...

Latest answer posted September 9, 2020 10:19 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Hills Like White Elephants

The shadow of a cloud moved across the field of grain and she saw the river through the trees. ‘And we could have all this,’ she said. ‘And we could have everything and every day we make it more...

Latest answer posted November 13, 2011 7:01 am UTC

1 educator answer

Hills Like White Elephants

It is important that we understand and do not underestimate the pressure that Jig is facing and is placed under by her lover. Part of the greatness of this short story is the fact that so much of...

Latest answer posted December 21, 2010 6:46 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Hills Like White Elephants

Ernest Hemingway offers a story of a man and a woman who have fundamentally different visions of their lives and of their possible life together. The man seems to believe that they could...

Latest answer posted September 7, 2019 6:03 am UTC

1 educator answer

Hills Like White Elephants

The general term "fiction" is a form of art or entertainment that is largely derived from imagination, although it may be based on real events. Specifically, "prose fiction" as a form of...

Latest answer posted October 8, 2009 6:36 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Hills Like White Elephants

In “Hills like White Elephants,” Hemingway does not explicitly tell us the ages of either the American or Jig. Because Jig is pregnant, we can infer that she is between the ages of puberty and...

Latest answer posted January 24, 2012 8:07 am UTC

1 educator answer

Hills Like White Elephants

In the short story, a young American couple stops at a train station in northern Spain. Through sparse text and without actually stating the word “abortion,” Hemingway reveals a conflict brewing...

Latest answer posted March 11, 2021 7:42 pm UTC

1 educator answer

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