Henry V Questions and Answers

Henry V

But if it be a sin to covet honor, I am the most offending soul alive. [Henry, in Henry V, 4.3.31-32] Honor is of the utmost importance to King Henry V in Shakespeare's Henry V. Henry views honor...

Latest answer posted June 5, 2019 11:49 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Henry V

William Shakespeare's play, Henry V, is loosely based on actual historical events, but also includes invented material and compresses the actual time sequence of the events. The single most...

Latest answer posted December 10, 2015 1:29 am UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

I think a major theme in the play is maturity. Throughout the play, Henry has to make choices that are difficult and at odds with who he was as Prince Hal in the Henry IV plays. The famous example...

Latest answer posted November 23, 2018 12:31 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Henry V

If we examine the text carefully in Act IV scene 1, we can see that actually, although Henry borrows the cloak from Erpingham, it is Pistol who comes across Henry rather than the other way round....

Latest answer posted October 14, 2011 6:46 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

William Shakespeare uses a variety of motifs and devices in Act 3, scenes 1 and 2 of his play Henry V. Among such features of these scenes are examples of repetition, similes, flattery, and the use...

Latest answer posted February 3, 2012 6:12 am UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

In order to truly understand Shakespeare's attitude to war is, one must look at this play, Henry V in context. In the eight plays from Richard II-Richard III, Shakespeare explores war, from Henry...

Latest answer posted September 25, 2010 2:02 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Henry V

Imagery is everywhere in Shakespeare: open your play at any page, and there'll be something interesting there which deepens or makes more complex the meaning of the passage. Once more unto the...

Latest answer posted November 2, 2008 2:24 am UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

Some critics regard this excellent play as being a study of what makes a perfect King (or Queen). Let us not forget that this play is actually the last of three plays that chart the rise of the...

Latest answer posted July 24, 2011 11:12 pm UTC

5 educator answers

Henry V

Shakespeare's Henry V sees war as an ugly means to a valuable end. On the surface, he's very concerned with justifying the war; he asks Canterbur, "may we with right and conscience make this...

Latest answer posted July 24, 2018 3:06 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Henry V

Issues of gender are among a variety of issues raised in the Prologue to Act 3 of Shakespeare’s play Henry V. The prologue opens with a Chorus (a male actor presumably playing a male character)...

Latest answer posted September 17, 2011 4:09 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

Another crucial theme is war as a source of human--or at least, in Shakespeare's telling, masculine--virtue. It is significant that Henry proves his worth as a leader through his military exploits....

Latest answer posted July 24, 2012 3:24 pm UTC

3 educator answers

Henry V

Critics are divided about Henry V's attitudes, suggesting that Shakespeare may have intentionally left his character ambiguous and ill defined. One clue is Henry's conversation with Canterbury...

Latest answer posted January 29, 2010 11:04 am UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

The main conflict in Henry V is, on the surface, the war between the English and French. Both want to govern France, and both kings claim that they have the right to do so so based on their...

Latest answer posted July 29, 2018 8:43 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Henry V

The notion of dramatic representation is one that the character of the Chorus is devoted to, as his principal role seems to be to plead with the audience to overlook the various limitations of the...

Latest answer posted September 19, 2011 8:03 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

The Globe Theatre, where the play was originally performed, was nicknamed "The Wooden O" on account of its shape and the material from which it was made. This gave it the appearance of a giant...

Latest answer posted August 24, 2018 4:54 am UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

Well, there are plenty to choose from in this speech where the Chorus calls upon the audience to suspend their disbelief once again and use their imagination to call up the sights of the ships...

Latest answer posted September 16, 2011 8:06 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

In Act 1, Scene 1, the Archbishop of Canterbury and the Bishop of Ely are discussing an old bill that has resurfaced in King Henry's court. Both the Archbishop and the Bishop are against this bill...

Latest answer posted August 16, 2016 4:28 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

I think that overall, Shakespeare sees war as a glorious and patriotic endeavor in this play. After all, the climactic event in the play is the glorious and famous English victory over the French...

Latest answer posted January 30, 2010 10:10 am UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

This is an interesting and valuable question, since it touches on the issue of the extent to which Shakespeare's plays represent or endorse the old feudal order, or rather, look forward into the...

Latest answer posted February 25, 2019 10:41 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Henry V

I think, as with any Shakespeare play, there are a number of possible different readings that could be supported. It is interesting that the famous Lawrence Olivier version of the film is...

Latest answer posted April 30, 2011 4:00 am UTC

3 educator answers

Henry V

The allusion here, very relevantly to Henry V, is to an English bowman in battle. Obviously archers only had a limited supply of arrows (or "bolts"), and so a good, wise archer would carefully...

Latest answer posted March 14, 2009 9:23 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

It is absolutely vital to remember that this play is as much about the makings of a perfect king as it is about anything else. Henry has a lot to prove. Remember how he was famed for his dissolute...

Latest answer posted January 26, 2011 7:34 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

In many ways Henry V can be seen as Shakespeare's portrait of an ideal English king, very different from the many corrupt, murderous, and mad monarchs he depicts in other plays. The play, most...

Latest answer posted November 16, 2020 9:32 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

Henry V's anonymous walk among his men is a tremendously important part of the play. Henry hopes to hear that his men follow him faithfully and believe the invasion of France is just. Williams,...

Latest answer posted March 17, 2010 3:58 am UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

Henry V takes place against the backdrop of The Hundred Years' War, which, as the name suggests, was a long, drawn-out conflict—a particularly brutal one at that—between England and France. The...

Latest answer posted October 16, 2017 7:54 am UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

The style of the prologue to Act 3 of Shakespeare’s play Henry V might be described in a number of ways, including the following: Unifying, as in the opening word “Thus,” which links Act 3 with the...

Latest answer posted September 17, 2011 7:17 am UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

William Shakespeare’s play Henry V invites some comparison with various poems inspired by World War I, especially with Wilfred Owen’s poem titled “Futility” and with Rupert Brooke’s poem titled...

Latest answer posted February 5, 2012 12:19 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

OK, here is what he is saying but I will summarize each sentence rather than take it line by line. A muse is inspiration, so the Chorus is calling for fiery inspiration where he could create for...

Latest answer posted October 22, 2010 6:15 am UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

The theme of conflict in this rousing speech by the Chorus is mostly related to the way that the English army is depicted and how its might and bravery is contrasted with the French army in this...

Latest answer posted September 19, 2011 8:17 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

Although Henry V of England and Charles VI of France are on opposite sides in this increasingly bloody, bitter conflict, they can still respect each other. Charles shows his respect for Henry and...

Latest answer posted February 18, 2021 12:03 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

Falstaff is a character who never actually appears in this brilliant history play, though news of his death does reach the ears of the characters. We need to remember that Henry V is the third part...

Latest answer posted November 21, 2011 7:03 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

I would use a sword. I like the flag idea, but that's taken. A sword is a symbol of power, but in this case is also a symbol of camaraderie. For the king to have a sword means he is also in the...

Latest answer posted July 28, 2011 12:56 am UTC

4 educator answers

Henry V

This is actually a very shrewd question. Let us remember that this play is about kingship, and in particular tries to show us the process by which Henry V becomes a "perfect" King, facing many...

Latest answer posted June 5, 2011 7:12 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

Henry V, Act V Scene ii King Henry to Katharine: What! aspeaker is but a prater; a rhyme is but a ballad. Agood leg will fall; a straight back will stoop; ablack beard will turn white; a curled...

Latest answer posted February 11, 2010 11:15 am UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

Henry V, as depicted in the play of the same name by William Shakespeare, is a complex man who must balance his authority and responsibilities as King with his personal demons, worries, and fears....

Latest answer posted October 13, 2014 11:08 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

Henry V is a man who, upon ascending to the throne, has vowed to change from the feckless young man we saw in Henry IV, Parts 1 & 2. He is intent upon being "no tyrant, but a Christian king,"...

Latest answer posted June 6, 2018 10:24 am UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

One of the brilliant things about Shakespeare’s plays, and one of the reasons they still continue to be performed century after century, is the fact that Shakespeare is not a moralist. His plays...

Latest answer posted January 30, 2016 2:48 am UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

I have to admit that I find the St. Crispin day speech rather cynical and manipulating, which is of course one possible reading of the play, as Henry becomes more and more Machiavellian and learns...

Latest answer posted April 30, 2011 3:55 am UTC

2 educator answers

Henry V

The lines you quote are from the play Henry V. These lines are spoken in Act II, Scene 3. The lines are spoken by Mistress Quickly, who is the Hostess and Keeper of the Boar's Head Tavern in...

Latest answer posted February 20, 2010 4:38 am UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

The lines you cite here are from the play Henry V. They are spoken in Act IV, Scene 1 of that play. The lines are spoken by the King himself. The context here is that Henry has just gotten...

Latest answer posted February 20, 2010 4:48 am UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

Set in the early fifteenth century, Henry V is incredibly relevant to the time of its plot in that it not only reveals the victory of the English over the French at Agincourt but also vividly...

Latest answer posted January 1, 2009 11:18 am UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

Problems in the performance, and not related to themes? The most immediate of these issues are practical. First, creating the disguises. You have in As You Like It Rosalind, a young woman who is...

Latest answer posted May 28, 2007 12:40 am UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

This is a very complex question and, you're right, there are internal definitions at play that prescribe certain kinds of information for each. Let's see if we can sort it out. Let's start with...

Latest answer posted January 16, 2010 10:11 am UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

If I'm reading it correctly, it appears that the question was for Act IV, scene 1, not Act I, Scene 1.Act IV, scene 1 takes place the night before the Battle of Agincourt. Henry is making his way...

Latest answer posted October 12, 2007 2:39 pm UTC

2 educator answers

Henry V

In Henry IV, part 2, the dying king advises Prince Hal that the best way to avoid internal conflicts is to focus the country on foreigners. At the beginning of Henry V, the Archbishop of Canterbury...

Latest answer posted October 27, 2010 2:09 am UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

The French characters are largely depicted as decadent and arrogant in Henry V. The Dauphin's sending Henry tennis balls is a great example of this: here, he is mocking Henry's youth and playboy...

Latest answer posted June 16, 2020 12:06 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

If I'm understanding your question correctly, you are inquiring as to whether or not there is a diplomat or ambassador in the play Henry V. If that is correct, then yes, there are a couple of...

Latest answer posted October 26, 2007 10:39 am UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

"If Shakespeare had presented the real Henry with all his aspects, including his limitations, his occasional craftiness and slightly nauseating sanctimony, he might have provoked the most notable...

Latest answer posted November 22, 2011 6:39 am UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

Rupert Brooke’s sonnet titled “Peace” bears some resemblance to the speech in William Shakespeare’s play Henry V in which Henry prepares his men for their battle against the French at Agincourt....

Latest answer posted February 3, 2012 8:53 am UTC

1 educator answer

Henry V

A key function of the Chorus in this excellent play is to "fill in the blanks" as it were of what the staging is unable to achieve, and to ask the audience to use their imagination, helped by his...

Latest answer posted September 15, 2011 8:05 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Showing 1-50 of 59