I heard a Fly buzz—when I died— Questions and Answers

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

Dickinson uses regular and irregular—or, more specifically, slant—rhyme in this poem. In Dickinson's slant rhyme, two words end with the same consonant, but the vowels before the consonant don't...

Latest answer posted September 8, 2018, 1:42 pm (UTC)

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I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

In this poem, the speaker's tone is calm, even flat. There is a calmness to the speaker's tone that causes the reader to realize death is a natural part of life. The speaker is as a ghost or...

Latest answer posted June 3, 2012, 8:40 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

In this classic poem by Emily Dickinson, the speaker is a dead person who is reflecting back on the last moments of her life and the moment of her death. The poem uses great diction, visual and...

Latest answer posted March 24, 2011, 3:29 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

Like many of Emily Dickinson's poems, "I heard a Fly buzz--when I died--" focuses on death and what may happen after a person's physical body dies. For Dickinson, this exploration of the afterlife...

Latest answer posted December 19, 2015, 7:25 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

Emily Dickinson's poems can be enigmatic and hard to understand. In poem 591, "I heard a fly buzz - when I died," she is describing the impossible, namely, her own death. Her spirit is speaking to...

Latest answer posted January 30, 2016, 2:36 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

This excellent poem by Emily Dickinson represents another of her poems focusing on the topic of death. However, in this poem, unlike others that present death in a momentous or terrifying way,...

Latest answer posted July 3, 2011, 9:53 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

American Romanticism shares some characteristics with British Romanticism, such as a preoccupation with nature, and the depths of emotion that can be stimulated by nature. We certainly see elements...

Latest answer posted January 4, 2019, 3:15 pm (UTC)

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I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

A person who recently died describes the scene at her deathbed in “I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—” The mood in the room is solemn and peaceful. Nonetheless, this calm atmosphere has an undertone...

Latest answer posted April 21, 2021, 10:37 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

Concrete diction is built with words that allow the reader to create a mental picture of the author’s intention. These are usually sensory words that appeal to the reader’s ability to imaginatively...

Latest answer posted March 29, 2015, 8:16 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

This pattern that other editors have identified—one line in iambic tetrameter (four feet, each having one unaccented syllable followed by one accented syllable), followed by one line in iambic...

Latest answer posted February 17, 2018, 6:19 pm (UTC)

3 educator answers

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

In Emily Dickinson's "I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—," our attention is drawn to sound first by the use of onomatopoeia and the word "buzz." This word draws our attention perhaps more so than the...

Latest answer posted November 9, 2010, 5:11 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

Like the buzzing of a fly, the rhythm of Emily Dickinson's poem, "I heard a Fly buzz--when I died--" is interrupted by dashes. In this poem, Dickinson uses her formal pattern of iambic tetrameter...

Latest answer posted March 23, 2011, 12:13 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

“I heard a Fly buzz—when I died-(591)” I heard a Fly buzz--when I died-- The Stillness in the Room Was like the Stillness in the Air— Between the Heaves of Storm— This famous poem by Emily...

Latest answer posted January 11, 2016, 7:34 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

Let's start with the easier—the explicit. Our speaker starts by saying that she literally heard a fly buzz when she died. Move to stanza two and we learn that the room gets quiet and it would seem...

Latest answer posted January 12, 2016, 2:53 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

In Emily Dickinson's poem "I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—," we know that the speaker has prepared herself for death through both the situational descriptions provided in the poem and the poem's...

Latest answer posted November 8, 2020, 6:00 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

The speaker in this poem gives away very little about themselves—we do not know whether the speaker is a man or a woman, how old they were, or where they were from. However, we do learn one very...

Latest answer posted March 21, 2018, 7:10 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

Both Dickinson’s poem and Porter’s story foreground the banality of death. But that is not to say the meaning of these pieces is that death does not matter. Porter and Dickinson are concerned with...

Latest answer posted December 22, 2017, 2:32 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

I will echo the above. Dickinson's point was about how although we see death as a major event, in the natural world it is not. Death is an every day occurance. Sitting with someone as they die...

Latest answer posted June 28, 2012, 6:41 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

Both Dickinson's poem and Katerine Anne Porter's poem compare in several literary aspects: THEMES Thematically, these works are both examinations of the time of death and what one experiences. For...

Latest answer posted May 1, 2012, 4:59 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

In this poem, Dickinson presents an ironic portrait of death, relying on unexpected elements to make death seem ordinary and commonplace. The line opens with a point of situational irony. As the...

Latest answer posted October 28, 2021, 5:01 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

In "I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—" the speaker describes the moment in which she transitions from life to death. In the opening stanza, the speaker emphasizes the "stillness" and quietness of...

Latest answer posted April 7, 2021, 8:27 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

Imagery and symbolism are similar literary devices in that they both provide a picture of something. What underlies imagery and symbolism is visibility. For imagery and symbolism to function, there...

Latest answer posted August 26, 2021, 6:14 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

This poem is such a contrast to another of Emily Dickenson's poems about death, "Because I could not stop for death." In that poem, death is like a gallant visitor who sweeps the narrator's soul...

Latest answer posted November 29, 2009, 5:53 am (UTC)

4 educator answers

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

In this poem, the speaker, who is already deceased, reflects upon the moment of her death. In the first stanza, the speaker describes the stillness of the moment, and in the second stanza, the...

Latest answer posted January 11, 2020, 10:42 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

Emily Dickinson is my all-time favorite poet, so it is a joy to help you with this question! The poem "I Heard a Fly Buzz—When I died" seems to be focusing on the literal moment of death for the...

Latest answer posted November 28, 2018, 3:27 pm (UTC)

2 educator answers

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

The word "Blue" gives us an indication of the type of fly she heard. Blowflies in New England are typically blue. They are hated because after the female lays about 150-200 eggs, they hatch into...

Latest answer posted November 12, 2008, 1:11 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

The notion of the fly as gatekeeper to judgment and damnation is interesting, and certainly has mythological and iconic merit. Religious imagery often features flies as symbols of the grotesque and...

Latest answer posted January 8, 2014, 9:05 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

At the end of the poem, the speaker dies. We can tell the speaker dies at the end of the poem because at the end of the poem the speaker can no longer see. And then the Windows failed - and then I...

Latest answer posted October 5, 2014, 4:32 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

This poem by Emily Dickinson was written around 1863, yet because it deals with the subject of death, it is still as meaningful today as when it was written. Interestingly, the narrator of the poem...

Latest answer posted February 10, 2016, 4:19 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

Consider the forms of life that the speaker identifies in the poem: herself, a king, and the lowly fly. The speaker, as she listens to the vibrant buzz of the lowliest creature on earth, the fly,...

Latest answer posted October 22, 2008, 6:49 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

I believe Emily chose the fly for two main reasons. The first reason is a practical one. 'Fly' is a really easy one syllable word to rhyme with. Looking at how the word is used within the...

Latest answer posted June 23, 2012, 11:19 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

Let's start with a simple overview of what the poem says. The narrator is dying, people have gathered around, and the entire room is a peaceful place to be. Unfortunately, a fly enters the room and...

Latest answer posted March 24, 2018, 2:49 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

I think that there are several poems where Dickinson reflects on death as if she is an active part in the events. I would say that "I Felt a Funeral, in my Brain" contains a similar tone to "I hear...

Latest answer posted March 26, 2011, 7:45 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

I have a different viewpoint here. I do believe the fly could, in fact, be real. If one is on one's deathbed and drifting in and out of consciousness, or one is very, very close to death, one may...

Latest answer posted October 28, 2008, 11:51 am (UTC)

2 educator answers

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

Let's start with the basics. The poem is divided into four separate stanzas, and each stanza is four lines long. The poem's rhythm is iambic. This means that Dickinson alternates her syllable...

Latest answer posted March 21, 2018, 2:46 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

Emily Dickinson had a way within her poetry to convey information, and also provide more questions than answers. In the poem, "I heard a Fly buzz—when I died," there is a great deal of speculation...

Latest answer posted February 1, 2011, 5:02 am (UTC)

1 educator answer

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

In both poems, the speaker has a battle that is all her own with an insect world that represents inner longing and struggle. In Dickinson's "I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—," the speaker is dying....

Latest answer posted May 8, 2022, 7:50 pm (UTC)

1 educator answer

I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—

One interpretation might be that there isn't a recurrent metaphor in this poem. There is some figurative language—Dickinson uses a simile to describe the atmosphere in the room where she is dying...

Latest answer posted March 21, 2018, 6:57 am (UTC)

1 educator answer