Harlem Questions and Answers

Harlem

The main theme of this short poem by Langston Hughes is the harmful result of suppressing or deferring dreams. Hughes offers several possibilities as to what might happen to a dream when it is...

Latest answer posted February 12, 2021 11:26 am UTC

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Harlem

"Harlem" is written in free verse, having no established sense of meter or rhyme. Its lines vary in length and employ both indentations and italics in its form. All of these elements lend to the...

Latest answer posted March 31, 2021 11:33 am UTC

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Harlem

Figurative language is a device used by poets and other writers to create a more effective impression upon readers. Figures of speech such as similes, for example, allow authors to express concepts...

Latest answer posted April 29, 2020 3:28 pm UTC

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Harlem

In order to give you some context for better understanding this very short poem's central metaphor, it is important to note that it was published within a longer volume of linked jazz-inspired...

Latest answer posted April 21, 2021 12:50 am UTC

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Harlem

A simile is a figure of speech in which an author makes a comparison between two unlike things. Using the words "like" or "as" confirms the similarity. The purpose is to emphasize the description...

Latest answer posted December 29, 2019 6:46 am UTC

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Harlem

Given the first line of the poem—the question "What happens to a dream deferred?"—it seems that the speaker is a person who has had some dream of his (or hers) deferred. To "defer" something means...

Latest answer posted May 14, 2020 1:53 am UTC

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Harlem

While Langston Hughes's "Harlem" does not have a specific meter or rhyme pattern, it does create a pattern, via the use of similes, to speculate on the opening line "What happens to a dream...

Latest answer posted January 22, 2018 2:47 am UTC

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Harlem

Since the Harlem Renaissance, Harlem, a burrow of New York City, has been tied to both the realities of oppression of black people and the expressions of black people. The title, "Harlem",...

Latest answer posted October 29, 2019 4:30 am UTC

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Harlem

The images created in the poem help to illuminate world of denial and the inaction of dreams. The idea of the shriveled up raisin in the blistering sun helps to expose the reader to a mental...

Latest answer posted March 11, 2010 10:31 pm UTC

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Harlem

The poem, “Harlem,” by Langston Hughes is a warning to his readers as to what happens when one puts off or defers one’s dreams. It is motivational in nature, asking his readers to reflect on what...

Latest answer posted April 8, 2016 8:46 pm UTC

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Harlem

Given that the last line contains the only metaphor in the poem -- all of the other comparisons that came before are similes -- and because metaphor is generally believed to be the strongest method...

Latest answer posted February 22, 2016 12:29 pm UTC

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Harlem

Tone is generally determined by several factors. In Langston Hughes's poem "Harlem," tone can best be determined by his use of imagery. This work has a simple structure: it is a series of images...

Latest answer posted September 24, 2010 11:36 am UTC

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Harlem

This very famous poem, which was used as the basis of the title for the famous play, A Raisin in the Sun, asks a question and gives us a series of possible answers without ever answering that...

Latest answer posted November 17, 2011 5:48 pm UTC

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Harlem

The poem about a "Dream Deferred, " or "Harlem," or "Montage of a Dream Deferred" represents Langston Hughes' exploration of the results of dreams that are set aside or dismissed. The poem...

Latest answer posted July 27, 2009 6:44 am UTC

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Harlem

Langston Hughes poem "Harlem" written in 1951 spoke of the frustration of the black people before the Civil Rights movement which began later in the decade. Segregation ran rampant throughout the...

Latest answer posted August 15, 2012 2:20 am UTC

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Harlem

In this poem, the speaker considers the various possible outcomes of a dream that has been delayed or put off, and he uses a series of similes followed by one, final metaphor. Because a metaphor...

Latest answer posted July 19, 2016 2:50 am UTC

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Harlem

Langston Hughes employs many examples of figurative language in the poem. The overwhelming use of imagery, or mental pictures, populate the poem in helping the reader understand the implications...

Latest answer posted October 18, 2009 3:07 am UTC

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Harlem

Word choice is also known as diction in poetry. In this poem, Hughes' diction is both simple and poetic. It is simple because he uses mostly everyday words that ordinary people would know, such as...

Latest answer posted December 3, 2018 4:12 am UTC

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Harlem

Hughes uses five similes and one metaphor to convey the idea that dreams which are "deferred" or delayed can hurt the dreamer as well as those who might work to put the dream off. The title,...

Latest answer posted December 17, 2018 7:48 pm UTC

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Harlem

This is an interesting question, since Langston Hughes's "Harlem" is generally noted for its imagery, not its alliteration or rhyme. The poem does contain those things, of course, and they do...

Latest answer posted September 20, 2010 1:39 am UTC

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Harlem

If we look at the poem, we notice that two main literary devices are central to it: the question and the simile. A simile is a comparison that uses the words like or as. Examining the poem, we...

Latest answer posted January 7, 2019 8:43 pm UTC

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Harlem

Langston Hughes's poem "Harlem" takes the form of a series of questions. This in itself sharpens the tone. A single question may be friendly, but a series of questions, without a pause for answers,...

Latest answer posted April 25, 2021 11:35 pm UTC

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Harlem

The speaker of this poem is trying to answer the question: "What happens to a dream deferred?" (line 1). Deferred means delayed or withheld. Typically, if one defers something, one puts it off...

Latest answer posted July 3, 2016 1:31 pm UTC

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Harlem

Hughes' fundamental question is one where there cannot be a direct and reductive answer. Simply put, one can only examine the possibilities and not derive a totalizing answer. This is why Hughes...

Latest answer posted September 17, 2010 8:48 pm UTC

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Harlem

Hughes does indeed use free verse in most of his poems, as the previous poster states, but "Harlem" is at least as structured as many of his other pieces and, I believe, can be analyzed more fully...

Latest answer posted October 27, 2009 12:32 am UTC

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Harlem

The theme Langston Hughes's poem "Dream Deferred" shares in common with Martin Luther King Jr.'s I Have a Dream speech is the idea that, although racism shrivels and cripples humanity, it also,...

Latest answer posted June 28, 2016 10:37 am UTC

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Harlem

Langston Hughes' poem “Harlem” looks at the adverse, and potentially even catastrophic, effects of the lack of opportunity in some parts of American society. Rhythm is the pattern created by the...

Latest answer posted May 15, 2016 1:48 pm UTC

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Harlem

Langston Hughes was a literary giant in American poetry. Writing during the period called the Harlem Renaissance, Hughes focused most of his poetry toward the Black American in the mid twentieth...

Latest answer posted September 8, 2012 2:52 pm UTC

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Harlem

For the speaker in this poem, the frustration of a dream deferred is like a wound. But is it an old wound that has scarred over, as the image of the dry raisin suggests. Or is it open and...

Latest answer posted March 8, 2008 10:26 am UTC

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Harlem

Yes, it is certainly significant that the questions remain unanswered and that the poem ends with a question and thus with no certainties for the future. The unanswered questions are functional to...

Latest answer posted September 15, 2010 3:30 am UTC

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Harlem

Langston Hughes wrote this poem in 1951, when he was becoming increasingly political in his poetry and increasingly under McCartney-era scrutiny for his left-wing politics. Hughes knew Harlem in...

Latest answer posted November 19, 2018 5:13 am UTC

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Harlem

Formalist perspective is a way to consider writing not as a means to knowledge or discovering meaning, but instead concentrates on simply stating a position. One may definitely consider Hughes'...

Latest answer posted April 13, 2008 6:30 am UTC

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Harlem

The Langston Hughes poem “Harlem,” also sometimes referred to as “A Dream Deferred,” is about the potentially devastating effects of oppression. There are a number of possible critical approaches...

Latest answer posted June 27, 2016 1:31 pm UTC

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Harlem

Langston Hughes "Harlem" (also commonly referred to by its first line, "What happens to a dream deferred?") is part of a larger group of poems published in 1951, Montage of a Dream Deferred. Like...

Latest answer posted December 15, 2018 5:04 pm UTC

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Harlem

It is vitally important to remember that this poem is set during the Great Depression of the 1930s, a time of unprecedented want and poverty, which of course imapcted those who were looked down...

Latest answer posted May 31, 2011 8:42 pm UTC

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Harlem

Langston Hughes’ poem “Harlem” (it appears under a number of other titles, too) was indeed written a couple of decades after the Harlem Renaissance had ended and quite rightly might be taken, in...

Latest answer posted November 20, 2011 12:02 am UTC

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Harlem

In stanza one, the word "dry"—in the phrase "dry up"—is used as a verb. The implication here is that a dream deferred as good as disappears, as the water in a river would disappear if the river...

Latest answer posted June 11, 2019 8:59 am UTC

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Harlem

The poem is a pretty despairing picture of what happens when something long hoped for and dreamed about is constantly promised but never realized. It's a raisin in the sun which dries up, a sore...

Latest answer posted September 20, 2010 9:32 am UTC

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Harlem

Langston Hughes uses the elements of imagery and rhetorical question to foreshadow the destructive consequences of unfulfilled dreams. Particularly, the dream in question, and the subject of his...

Latest answer posted April 14, 2019 10:40 am UTC

1 educator answer

Harlem

The speaker in "Harlem" asserts that the realization of hopes and dreams is essential to a person's well-being. Through various similes, the reader is reminded of the harm that can come when dreams...

Latest answer posted October 12, 2019 1:07 am UTC

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Harlem

Hughes has a consistent theme of freedom and equality in much of his poetry, and that theme is evident in these three poems. He speaks of dreams, and the common dream that he shares in these poems...

Latest answer posted April 30, 2009 12:15 am UTC

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Harlem

Hughes' poem, "Harlem," though written 60 years ago, is highly relevant to the Black experience today. In this poem, Hughes' speaker asks what happens to dreams that never come to fulfillment. He...

Latest answer posted August 8, 2020 10:25 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Harlem

I edited your question slightly for it to make more sense, as your previous question was slightly unclear. I hope I have still captured the essence of what you wanted to ask! This famous poem by...

Latest answer posted January 23, 2011 6:51 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Harlem

In Langston Hughes' poem entitled "Harlem," the "dream deferred" here describes the American Dream that was available to all white people, but not to the black man. Even when laws were changed to...

Latest answer posted May 31, 2011 1:17 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Harlem

In "Harlem," Langston Hughes uses similes and a metaphor, as well as vivid and descriptive imagery, to convey the idea that forcing people to delay their dreams can lead to violence. Using a series...

Latest answer posted May 2, 2021 10:11 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Harlem

Hughes's narrator uses five similes to ponder what happens to a dream deferred (deferred means put off or delayed). (A simile is a comparison of two unalike things using the words like or as.)...

Latest answer posted June 20, 2018 3:49 pm UTC

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Harlem

The dream that Hughes refers to represents the hopes for social equality with whites that African Americans had cherished for so long but that always been frustrated. The opening question of the...

Latest answer posted September 15, 2010 3:11 am UTC

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Harlem

Claude McKay's "America" is a Shakespearean sonnet, composed in a stately, measured tone appropriate to the form. The poem employs several metaphors and similes to illustrate the poet's troubled...

Latest answer posted February 24, 2021 6:28 am UTC

1 educator answer

Harlem

First, the speaker asks, "What happens to a dream deferred?" By this, he seems to be asking the fate of a dream that has been put off or postponed. The poem is sort of an exploration of all the...

Latest answer posted March 10, 2016 7:33 pm UTC

1 educator answer

Harlem

In the mere act of raising questions, Hughes is expressing political and social values about what it means to be of color in America of the time period. At the time of Hughes' writing, being Black...

Latest answer posted August 12, 2010 5:25 pm UTC

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